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Author Topic: Fix squeaky pedal  (Read 1799 times)
quantum
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« on: July 28, 2005, 03:43:49 AM »

My Yamaha C3 tends to have a squeaky pedal.  I find a quick fix just to turn the rod underneath the piano, and the squeak is gone.  Obviously with constant use the rod slowly creeps back to the position that makes it squeak.  The source of the squeak seems to be at the top of the rod between the adjustment bolt and the padding attached to a lever that goes into the piano. 

Is there a better way to remedy this?  I know I can ask my technician, but he only comes around every 6 months. 
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buck
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« Reply #1 on: July 31, 2005, 02:23:19 AM »

How about a touch of WD-40?

Well you're at it, try applying some (with a brush!)  on the strings.  Lightly coat please! That'll prevent rust build-up.

Smiley
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jeremyjchilds
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« Reply #2 on: July 31, 2005, 03:57:45 AM »

I would avoid WD40 for squeaks (or bike chains) because it is a solvent, not a lubricant...as for putting it on your strings..who knows..I guess it would be better suited to that. (I've never hear of that..can you explain more?)

Use oil only when you are lubricating metal to metal componentry. use only a drop from a hypodermic needle.

Use a dry Graphite lube if wood is sqeaking.

I'm not sure though with your description, it seems like you have a stripped nut or something. (I would recomend just waiting untill your tech can have a look at it)

good luck
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Waldszenen
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« Reply #3 on: July 31, 2005, 09:38:22 AM »

I actually asked my tuner this out of curiosity, and he says that WD-40 is fine as long as it doesn't come into contact with any other parts of the piano, namely the wood.


Otherwise, a bit of axle grease can't hurt.
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jeremyjchilds
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« Reply #4 on: July 31, 2005, 08:50:36 PM »


Otherwise, a bit of axle grease can't hurt.

Yeah... Axle grease is good for "sticky Keys" Wink
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"He who answers without listening...that is his folly and his shame"    (A very wise person)
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