Piano Forum logo
October 24, 2014, 06:45:48 PM *
   Forum Home   Help Search  


Live Streamed Piano Recital with Murray McLachlan

A new piano recital series has been launched in Stockholm this fall. The first recital, with pianist Peter Jablonski took place on September 15 and today, you can hear British pianist Murray McLachlan play live from The Royal Academy of Fine Arts. Read more >>

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Piano tuning kits.  Which Online kit is best?  (Read 2235 times)
TwinkleFingers
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 208


« on: September 06, 2003, 07:01:47 AM »

Hello fellow pianists. I am wanting to learn how to tune the piano myself to avoid the costs of a tuner.  I know its not that expensive but it adds up over time.  Its not much when you think about it.  I almost pay for a piano tuner every month for the cost of the internet broadband! Maybe I should learn how to connect to the internet without an ISP  hehe!!  
But to my point,  which kit would anybody recommend for a beginner that would also be good for an advanced tuner(for later on when I get better hopefully)  I see many starter kits online but they are for a touchup tuning here and there till the next visit of the piano tuner.  also are those analog and digital tuning instruments any good, or will a simple A440 or C tuning fork suffice? thanks and have fun making beautiful piano music!! This should of been moved to the instruments category sorry about that I just realized it.
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged

My religion consists of a humble admiration of the illimitable superior spirit who reveals himself in the slight details we are able to perceive with our frail and feeble mind.
tosca1
PS Silver Member
Sr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 328


« Reply #1 on: September 06, 2003, 09:50:53 AM »

I would not recommend doing your own piano tuning as it is  an extremely subtle and complex activity.  Not only do you need to develop an exceptional sense of pitch and tone colour, but there is also an art in using the tuning key and applying the right pressure to turn the pin. It is a profession that requires endless hours of practice and experience.
Poor tuning could ruin a piano and irrevocably damage the pin block. A skilled, professional tuner can give an amazing "bloom" to the sound of a piano and it's well worth the cost.

Robert.
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged
debussy_lover
Guest
« Reply #2 on: September 06, 2003, 11:48:51 AM »

There are a number of shareware programs available for download that aid in tuning.  I recommend TuneIt, which you can find at http://download.com.com/3120-20-0.html?qt=tuning&tg=dl-2001&search=+Go%21+

If you have a microphone connected to your computer, and your piano is close by, you can easily tune the instrument to any number of temperaments.  You will need a tuning hammer, and the wedges that tuners use to dampen strings not being tuned.  (Sorry, don't know the term for those.)

It's quite true that you'll have to develop a very delicate touch.  This is especially true in the upper register, where a movement of only a miniscule amount will put the pitch out by 10 or 20 cents.  It takes a little practice, but things will go more quickly once you get the hang of it.

The major drawback to using software like this is that you invariably get a somewhat mechanical tuning.  The richness and uniqueness that a skilled tuner gets will be absent.  However, just for getting your piano sounding good, it does the job.  

Just don't break any strings!  Then you'll need to call the technician for sure.
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged
TwinkleFingers
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 208


« Reply #3 on: September 06, 2003, 03:15:08 PM »

i see where your coming from tosca.  but on the other hand, I dont know any skilled tuners in my area and along time ago we had one break 2 strings on our piano!! No rust either.  it was the second octave g from middle c. and then to fix it he only wrapped around the tuning pin just a little over 1 turn!! supposed to wrap it 3 times. so your right about the upper register being more sensitive.  however a tuner tech is still human and could still have no talent at all in tuning a piano.  I got a book from the library on tuning pianos by J. Cree Fischer, "PIANO TUNING" a simple and accurate method for amateurs.  It is a very detailed book. Probably overly detailed so as to confuse the beginner LOL!! As to tuning with computer, I would probably not use that.  It probably would sound very mechanincal like you said. and how accurated would a cheap mic that I have be?? what about the instruments that use the quartz for measuring. Are they any good?
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged

My religion consists of a humble admiration of the illimitable superior spirit who reveals himself in the slight details we are able to perceive with our frail and feeble mind.
TwinkleFingers
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 208


« Reply #4 on: September 06, 2003, 03:30:01 PM »

but anyway has anyone found a good value tuning kit online that they like?  Im going to practice tuning on my old piano.  which is way out of tune as it is.  first Im going to figure out a temperment.  ive seen a complete kit for 99 dollars with tuning hammer,wedges and mutes,and the electronic tuning instrument.  can that really replace a tuning fork?? Ive heard people say that by ear is still the way to go.  sorry tosca for being ignorant but I want to learn how to do this. and since it is my old piano i wont be nervous about breaking it which I'll be very careful anyway.  
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged

My religion consists of a humble admiration of the illimitable superior spirit who reveals himself in the slight details we are able to perceive with our frail and feeble mind.
TwinkleFingers
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 208


« Reply #5 on: September 07, 2003, 11:59:59 PM »

ill try your method of the software and see how that works.  need a tuning kit still though.  How many wedges and stuff do you need to tune?  will a basic tuning kit suffice?? or a proffessional or somewhere in between? thanks
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged

My religion consists of a humble admiration of the illimitable superior spirit who reveals himself in the slight details we are able to perceive with our frail and feeble mind.
rachfan
PS Silver Member
Sr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 2862


« Reply #6 on: September 25, 2003, 05:11:20 AM »

Once again, if you cause any damage it could have an adverse effect on your warranty.  I'd really think about this carefully.
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged

Interpreting music means exploring the promise of the potential of possibilities.
glamfolk
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 87


« Reply #7 on: September 26, 2003, 10:55:09 PM »

I bought an inexpensive tuning kit from the Schaff Company in suburban Chicago, and it consisted of the tuning hammer, some rubber wedges, and a book on tuning.  They also sell pre-assembled kits with more stuff in them.  It's important to talk to several tuners before trying it on your own.  You'll find that each has his or her own way of tuning.  I had an old upright that I tuned a few times before sort of getting the hang of it.  It's not majic--it's just an art, and takes practice.

I think that if you're playing anywhere, it's essential to have tuning equipment.  I don't ever have to completely tune an entire piano before I play, but it's great to be able to touch up a few notes and not have to worry about waiting on a tuner.
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  


Need more info or help?


Search pianostreet.com - the web's largest resource of information about piano playing:



 
Jump to:  


Most popular classical piano composers:
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2006-2007, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!

o