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What is really Johann Sebastian in the Notebook?

The familiar Minuet in G and its partner piece, Minuet in G minor were traditionally believed to have been composed by J. S. Bach. However, recent research points to the German composer and organist Christian Petzold. Read more >>

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Author Topic: Yamaha vs. Steinway  (Read 2972 times)
KyleE
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« on: September 06, 2003, 04:29:36 PM »

Currently, I have a Steinway model M located in my family room.  I have had this piano for about 6 years now.  After playing, practicing, and performing on the new yamaha pianos, I have developed a love for the sound, and the feel of them.  It is now time to get a new piano.  I am undecided whether it be a new Steinway, or a Yamaha.  People think I am crazy going from a Steinway to a Yamaha, but I wanted to get some other opinions.  Any help would be great.  Thanks.

Kyle
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eddie92099
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« Reply #1 on: September 06, 2003, 05:40:32 PM »

Steinways are special, Yamahas are stable,
Ed
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TwinkleFingers
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« Reply #2 on: September 06, 2003, 06:40:45 PM »

very well said ed!!
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Axtremus
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« Reply #3 on: September 07, 2003, 12:49:41 PM »

If you go from Steinway Model M or even Model B to Yamaha S-4 or S-6, I can understand that. Perfectly reasonable too if you want Yamaha's CFIIIS 9-foot Concert Grand. Personally, though, I would find it a step backwards to go to the Yamaha C-series piano. (And, the Yamaha S-4/6 ARE SPECIAL as well.) But, since one's preference for sound is a  very unique, very individual thing, if it's a C-series Yamaha that speaks to you, than that is the best for you. Grin
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eventemp
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« Reply #4 on: September 16, 2003, 11:16:57 PM »

I find your topic interesting in that I am going from a Yamaha C-3 to a Steinway Model L.  I love my C-3, that I have had for 6 years, but I have recently gotton much more serious and have decided to take the plunge....and buy the Steinway.  
My reason for the change is the tone...and I had to play a lot of Steinways before I found one that I liked....including a number of Model B's that I really found distasteful to my ears.  
But there is No Question that the Yamaha is more stable, and, for what you get, a better "quality" piano from the factory.  In fact, if I didn't live in the New York area, where I can get a factory technician to my house, I probably wouldn't get the Steinway.  I hope to change that opinion in a year, but that's how I feel right now.  
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Hmoll
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« Reply #5 on: September 17, 2003, 11:28:04 PM »

Identify what it is you like about the sound of the new Yamahas, and play numerous other brands. If you are in the US, you should try out Mason & Hamlins - close in price to Steinways, and I like them more. Also, there are some very good European makers - Estonia, for example - that you might want to play. If you have a big budget, play some Faziolis.
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tomingram
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« Reply #6 on: October 04, 2003, 09:01:50 AM »

I would personally go with the Steinway still.  However, you can get the Steinway "voiced" to sound more like the tone of a Yamaha.
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rachfan
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« Reply #7 on: October 04, 2003, 11:25:17 PM »

Kyle, I am assuming you are a jazz pianist.  The reason I say that is that very few classical pianists (Andre Watts not withstanding) would opt for the Yamaha, given its very rapid tone decay (which you can test for yourself with the second hand of your watch in making direct comparisons in any piano store).  That makes playing legato in classical music most difficult.  That's what spoils the Yamaha for me.  Jazz pianists, on the other hand, look for that percussive quality.  

I too used to own a Steinway M, which on sustain could blow Yamaha away.  I now have a Baldwin L, which also beats Yamaha on most counts in my opinion.  The only thing I do like about Yamaha on their larger grands is the action--very even in all respects.  But then again, anyone who has ever tried a Baldwin SD10 (9') would not readily opt for the Yamaha  CFIIIF either.
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eddie92099
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« Reply #8 on: October 05, 2003, 02:50:52 AM »

Quote
I would personally go with the Steinway still.  However, you can get the Steinway "voiced" to sound more like the tone of a Yamaha.


Yes, and I think I'll replace by Lamborghini engine with that of a remote control car...
Ed
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Magnus
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« Reply #9 on: October 07, 2003, 08:13:28 PM »

My advice is that you go for that u think is best. But the sount isnt all. Think about the things u press on to get sound. Do u like the rescistance. (I dont know the word in english), but we in norway say "tangenter".

Cheesy
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