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Top downloads - #4:
Beethoven - Piano Sonata (Moonlight)

Beethoven's most popular sonata. It is dedicated to his pupil, 17-year-old Countess Giulietta Guicciardi, with whom Beethoven was, or had been, in love. Read more >>

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Question: Which one of these do you find the most useful and effective?
Hanon's "The Virtuoso Pianist" - 12 (33.3%)
Cortot's "Principi razionali della tecnica pianistica" - 7 (19.4%)
Dohnanyi's "Essential Finger Excercises" - 17 (47.2%)
Total Voters: 36

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Author Topic: THE best piano technique excerises  (Read 9055 times)
frederic
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« on: December 10, 2005, 11:55:38 AM »

Which one do you find the most useful for you? and why so? Any tips on using them? And please reccomend any other books that you enjoy using.
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stevie
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« Reply #1 on: December 10, 2005, 02:04:49 PM »

i own all 3, cortot is the most extensive, hanon is the most...sh*t, and dohnanyi is the most efficient - timewise.

id say the dohnanyi is best, but if you want to work on a very specific thing, go for the cortot, the double-notes section is very thorough but some might say a bit pointless.....one things for sure, youd be a DN maztah.
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odsum25
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« Reply #2 on: December 10, 2005, 04:32:09 PM »

The Dohnanyi are my favorite by far. Hanon is utterly useless and the Cortot are so extensive that they become completely overwhelming. Dohnanyi's excercises are efficient and very effective to make your technique develop. They are not for beginners however.
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Beethoven’s Complete Works for Piano and Orchestra

For the final instalment of his survey of Beethoven’s works for piano and orchestra on BIS label, Ronald Brautigam has saved ‘the final crowning glory of his concerto output’... Read more >>

cfortunato
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« Reply #3 on: December 10, 2005, 04:38:58 PM »

Schmitt.  Opus 16.  They are very focused and very repetitive, and seem to cover just every finger combination.

For students, Czerny, because the musicality makes them interesting to play as well as useful.

Every loves Hanon, but I find him so boring that it just doesn't get done.
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pita bread
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« Reply #4 on: December 10, 2005, 08:51:37 PM »

i own all 3, cortot is the most extensive, hanon is the most...***, and dohnanyi is the most efficient - timewise.

id say the dohnanyi is best, but if you want to work on a very specific thing, go for the cortot, the double-notes section is very thorough but some might say a bit pointless.....one things for sure, youd be a DN maztah.

Do you have the Cortot as a pdf?
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danyal
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« Reply #5 on: December 10, 2005, 11:00:18 PM »

Does anyone have the Dohnanyi as a pdf?
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thalbergmad
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« Reply #6 on: December 10, 2005, 11:14:06 PM »

Does anyone have the Dohnanyi as a pdf?

But of course.

* Dohnanyi-Essential Finger Exercises P1.pdf (1791.69 KB - downloaded 3081 times.)
* Dohnanyi-Essential Finger Exercises P2.pdf (1961.04 KB - downloaded 2071 times.)
* Dohnanyi-Essential Finger Exercises P3.pdf (2088.66 KB - downloaded 1977 times.)
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The Case of Ravel

In this exclusive interview pianist Paul Roberts talks about his new book Reflections and the search for pathways into the core of musical interpretation. Read more >>

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« Reply #7 on: December 10, 2005, 11:21:58 PM »

Do you have the Cortot as a pdf?

Here is the Cortot.

* Cortot Grundbegriffe der Klaviertechnik.pdf (6005.05 KB - downloaded 2197 times.)
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kreso
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« Reply #8 on: December 10, 2005, 11:25:32 PM »

Unfortunatly I don't have Cortot, but I recomend Cortot's edition of Chopin Studies, in which you can find a lot of usefull stuff..
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pita bread
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« Reply #9 on: December 11, 2005, 12:10:38 AM »

Here is the Cortot.

Thank you kind sir.
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rosana
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« Reply #10 on: December 11, 2005, 12:52:32 AM »

Here is Cortot's Chopin Etudes op 10 pdf file.

Thanks thalbergmad for the other ones.

* Cortot Chopin Etudes.pdf (6583.88 KB - downloaded 1201 times.)
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Liszt: The Grand Sonata

In an article about one of the greatest masterpieces of the 19th century piano literature, Franz Liszt's Sonata in B minor, Patrick Jovell guides us through the history of the work as well as a few of the most common analytical approaches. Listen online to the two recommended performances by Vásáry and Arrau while you follow along in Liszt's autograph manuscript or the printed score available from Piano Street's sheet music library. Read more >>

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« Reply #11 on: December 11, 2005, 01:11:59 AM »

Interestingly, I had been looking for technique book and narrowed my search down to
Dohnanyi, Liszt, and Cortot.  I'm planning to spend the next 6-12 months on it.  I decided on the former primarily due to it having a similar reputation as the other two, but somewhat less overwhelming.

I would be interested if anyone that has gone through if they have suggestions on strategy to tackle it (order, speed, HS vs. HT, etc., etc.)

Dohnanyi support group anyone?

Thanks,
D-
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stevie
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« Reply #12 on: December 11, 2005, 07:12:07 AM »

at the start of the dohnanyi book he lists them in an order of difficulty, so that might help if you want to be progressive
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pianalex
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« Reply #13 on: December 11, 2005, 08:49:52 AM »

brill pdfs, thanksguys!  I've always liked the cortot method - anyone got the scherzi? Smiley
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frederic
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« Reply #14 on: December 11, 2005, 10:45:59 AM »

I own Cortot's edition of the Chopin Etudes and they are indeed very good.
I use Dohnanyi. The pianists who uses this as well, do you have any tips on how to practice these excercises to make the most out of them?
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« Reply #15 on: December 11, 2005, 11:16:32 AM »

my favorite : Brahms 51 execises and Dohnanyi essential finger execises
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La mano che ubbidisce al intelletto
presto agitato
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« Reply #16 on: December 11, 2005, 03:22:45 PM »

my favorite : Brahms 51 execises

How good are those exercises?
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Top downloads - #5:
Chopin - Nocturne in E-flat

The famous Nocturne in E-flat major, op 9 no 2 belong to a set of three Nocturnes, written in the beginning of the 1830s. They were dedicated to Marie Moke Pleyel, a virtuoso pianist and the wife of Camille Pleyel. Read more >>

demented cow
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« Reply #17 on: December 11, 2005, 03:31:38 PM »

Re Brahms 51 exercises: One of them is dangerous, the one with double notes played with 2-4 and 3-5 while the thumb is turned under the hand. I knew somebody who practised this every day - until something snapped and he couldn't use the hand for months. (BTW Does anyone have the Naxos recording of the Brahms 51? Does it actually sound musical?)
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stevie
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« Reply #18 on: December 11, 2005, 04:53:22 PM »

Re Brahms 51 exercises: One of them is dangerous, the one with double notes played with 2-4 and 3-5 while the thumb is turned under the hand. I knew somebody who practised this every day - until something snapped and he couldn't use the hand for months. (BTW Does anyone have the Naxos recording of the Brahms 51? Does it actually sound musical?)

hahaha, the brahms exercises are a bit random, good and interesting, but just not as practical and useful as old DON

Here is Cortot's Chopin Etudes op 10 pdf file.

Thanks thalbergmad for the other ones.

thanks!

got op25? Wink
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rosana
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« Reply #19 on: December 11, 2005, 06:47:48 PM »

Quote
got op25? Wink

Unfortunately not.
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danyal
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« Reply #20 on: December 11, 2005, 07:31:03 PM »

I was quickly reading through the Dohnanyi when I got to the chords at excercise 25a and it said "to be practised with closed eyes".... HAHAHA... I'm still laughing... heehee. I'm trying to imagine what it would sound like if I tried. Ok, maybe I should print it and try now (9:30pm). My neighbours were annoying me today.
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rimv2
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« Reply #21 on: December 12, 2005, 02:17:04 AM »

I was quickly reading through the Dohnanyi when I got to the chords at excercise 25a and it said "to be practised with closed eyes".... HAHAHA... I'm still laughing... heehee. I'm trying to imagine what it would sound like if I tried. Ok, maybe I should print it and try now (9:30pm). My neighbours were annoying me today.

tha true road to mastery Cool
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« Reply #22 on: December 12, 2005, 04:04:01 AM »

The Brahms 51 is like a bible to me Smiley helps to build a reliable motor-control, hand-touch yet very musical...yeah many of them stretch a lot (must be practised carefully) but these finger execises are execellent for introducing to his unique keyboard and a hint as to the colour and texture of his sonorities.
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applelover
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« Reply #23 on: December 12, 2005, 04:51:29 AM »

Someone at the top of this thread said the Hanon excercises are useless.  I'm starting them now my piano teacher says they're good, why do you say they're useless.  Please help, I don't want to waste my time on useless excercises.
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stevie
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« Reply #24 on: December 12, 2005, 06:22:30 AM »

Someone at the top of this thread said the Hanon excercises are useless.  I'm starting them now my piano teacher says they're good, why do you say they're useless.  Please help, I don't want to waste my time on useless excercises.

for beginners they are good, i guess

they 2nd half of the book is pretty standard, basic 3rds and scales etc. and these are covered better in the dohnanyi and others.

but the 1st half are basic figurations that arent really useful for anyone that is beyond the beginners stange, they basically have you repeating fingerings like 132435 or 12435 or 15423 etc etc.

good for basic coordination, but....
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World Premiere: Piano Piece in G by Felix Mendelssohn

The first edition ever of a newly discovered piece by Mendelssohn was presented by Piano Street at the Music Education Expo in London earlier this month. The Urtext Piano Score and Autograph Manuscript are now available for download. Read more >>

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« Reply #25 on: December 12, 2005, 11:53:58 AM »

What about Herz?
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frederic
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« Reply #26 on: December 12, 2005, 01:29:00 PM »

Dear Dohnanyi users. How many of you have mastered the insanely difficult No.9?
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daniel patschan
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« Reply #27 on: December 12, 2005, 08:10:27 PM »

I think the Cortot exercises are really good. This man knew the instrument. Of course, there are different approaches to learn technique (everything about this topic has been discussed intensively in this forum) but Cortot shows one possible way i think. He is one of the few people who really describes movements and who explains how to achieve this and that. The 'Principles ...' are an excellent work in my opinion. Unfortenately, i takes a long time to go through everything - so my suggestion for the technique book of (second) choice goes to Dohnanyi. He focuses on the most important aspects of mechanism. Nevertheless, some of the are hard to perform (No. 9-11) but at the end it's definitely worth it.
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BoliverAllmon
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« Reply #28 on: December 13, 2005, 05:44:29 PM »

Schmitt.  Opus 16.  They are very focused and very repetitive, and seem to cover just every finger combination.


my teacher would agree. He says, "true finger independence cannot be achieve until one has shoveled enough schimitt." LOL
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g_s_223
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« Reply #29 on: December 14, 2005, 12:30:59 AM »

Re Brahms 51 exercises: One of them is dangerous, the one with double notes played with 2-4 and 3-5 while the thumb is turned under the hand. I knew somebody who practised this every day - until something snapped and he couldn't use the hand for months. (BTW Does anyone have the Naxos recording of the Brahms 51? Does it actually sound musical?)
I have this recording. Zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz..........
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rob47
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« Reply #30 on: December 14, 2005, 03:46:22 PM »

the only technique books i ever used were when i was a small child. They were quite wicked:



However my double notes are quite brutally bad Cool
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presto agitato
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« Reply #31 on: December 31, 2005, 04:44:37 AM »

After talking to several piano teachers and concert pianists, all agree that the best book of piano technique exercise is Bach´s WTC num 1.

What you say?
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The masterpiece tell the performer what to do, and not the performer telling the piece what it should be like, or the cocomposer what he ought to have composed.

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« Reply #32 on: December 31, 2005, 05:46:26 AM »

After talking to several piano teachers and concert pianists, all agree that the best book of piano technique exercise is Bach´s WTC num 1.

What you say?

Right on the money.  I would add the Mozart sonatas.  Practice them carefully and you shall be rewarded.

...and next time there is one of those idiotic "rate these pieces in order of difficulty" there should be a reference to the very amusing and yet interesting repertoire list in the back of the Cortot studies.
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turner
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« Reply #33 on: December 31, 2005, 06:20:43 AM »

I haven't checked this board for a while, and when I tried to download the PDFs today I got a message saying that the files were damaged. Would any of you be able to upload the files again? Thanks in advance.

Regarding Brahms, Idil Biret recorded his Exercises in her complete set for Naxos. If you look her up on Amazon.com, you'd actually find audio samples of her rendition of these exercises. And I'll leave you to decide whether these are musical.  Wink


Re Brahms 51 exercises: One of them is dangerous, the one with double notes played with 2-4 and 3-5 while the thumb is turned under the hand. I knew somebody who practised this every day - until something snapped and he couldn't use the hand for months. (BTW Does anyone have the Naxos recording of the Brahms 51? Does it actually sound musical?)
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« Reply #34 on: December 31, 2005, 09:40:39 AM »

The only purely technical device I use is my practice clavier, and then for only around ten minutes a day. I have used it for over thirty years and I consider it has accrued me incalulable benefit, especially for finger work. I haven't played exercises at the piano for decades; once I'm at the piano I just make music.
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pita bread
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« Reply #35 on: December 31, 2005, 10:27:29 AM »

Re Brahms 51 exercises: One of them is dangerous, the one with double notes played with 2-4 and 3-5 while the thumb is turned under the hand. I knew somebody who practised this every day - until something snapped and he couldn't use the hand for months. (BTW Does anyone have the Naxos recording of the Brahms 51? Does it actually sound musical?)

That's a vital technique for the Stravinsky Petrushka and maybe the Busoni-Liszt Mephisto Waltz.
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