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The New Concept: Scores for All Stages of Learning

On the recent Music Education Expo in London, Piano Street presented a new concept for sheet music publication. Depending on your own level of experience and where you are in the learning process of a particular piece, you may need fingering, pedal markings, practice and performance tips, or perhaps the right opposite - a clean Urtext score. Read more >>

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Author Topic: Question about Piano levels and degree  (Read 14688 times)
jeffw88
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« on: April 03, 2009, 02:52:41 PM »

Hi, I've been paying piano for long time, on & off for about 10 years. 
I usually play the song I want, so I learn it myself with notes.
But I was wondering what's the official piano levels are there?
Can you give an example for each level?
What do you need to do get an official teaching degree?

Thanks in advance.
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lostinidlewonder
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« Reply #1 on: April 06, 2009, 05:57:31 AM »

List all the pieces you play and im sure we can give you some grade level for each.... Although it doesn't really mean much. To get a degree in teaching depends on which music school your country promotes.
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mc_shas
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« Reply #2 on: May 01, 2009, 11:17:22 PM »

Well in England there's the ABRSM grades which are probably the most popular (although trinity and Guildhall grades are a good rival) They go from 1 to 8 and it's sort of genrally considered that after grade 8 you can start teaching (the idea is a bit random tho). I know Debusy's second Arabesque was in the Grade 8 ABRSM syllabus a few years back but there where probably some slightly harder pieces as well and they would also expect a high level of musical understanding for grade 8. You also get technical exercises and general musician ship (aural skills and stuff). Most Universities require you to be approximately grade standard or better to get on to their bachelors music degree (at least any that have a half decent music department). After thos grades there's things like the performance diploma and I think the third movement of Beethoven's Moonlight was in it one year. Beyond that (if you good enough) it's Masters degree and competitions.

I'm around grade classical but play jazz as well and I teach beginners or more advanced classical students that want to learn jazz. Is this what you where asking? Hope that helped.
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db05
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« Reply #3 on: May 02, 2009, 06:47:02 AM »

The grading of the pieces on this site would give you an idea. Also try:
http://pianoforum.net/Graded_Pieces_All.xls
(An amazing  Shocked spreadsheet of graded pieces, compiled by Torp, of most pieces mentioned on this forum to date)
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silverchair87
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« Reply #4 on: May 05, 2009, 08:02:30 PM »

There's also the option of doing teaching diplomas instead of a degree, but again that probably depends where you come from. The ABRSM and Trinity College offer the "best" most popular diplomas in the UK, and they both offer diplomas in performance as well. You don't have to go to university or a conservatoire to get a diploma and they are generally considered to be of around the same level as various stages in a degree, ie:

(Trinity College) ATCL is level to 1st year in a degree course
                       LTCL is level to 3rd year in a degree course
                       FTCL is level to a postgraduate degree etc etc

You'd be best hunting around for the best options for you, good luck! Smiley
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perfect_pitch
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« Reply #5 on: May 12, 2009, 10:02:29 AM »

The grading of the pieces on this site would give you an idea. Also try:
http://pianoforum.net/Graded_Pieces_All.xls

Quick question - which grading system are they graded against - the ABRSM? AMEB? Trinity?

I only ask because I know that in the Australian AMEB is considered more difficult than the ABRSM's grade pieces... e.g. - The ABRSM lists Franck's Chorale, Prelude & Fugue as FMus (Fellowship of Music) grade... while the AMEB lists it as only LMus (Licentiate of Music - which is easier than the Fellowship).

But it's still an impressive list.
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db05
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« Reply #6 on: May 12, 2009, 10:26:31 AM »

It must've been mentioned earlier, but I forgot the thread that had the graded pieces. Sorry. (I don't do grades.)
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The New Concept: Scores for All Stages of Learning

On the recent Music Education Expo in London, Piano Street presented a new concept for sheet music publication. Depending on your own level of experience and where you are in the learning process of a particular piece, you may need fingering, pedal markings, practice and performance tips, or perhaps the right opposite - a clean Urtext score. Read more >>

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