Piano Forum logo
December 21, 2014, 06:01:00 PM *
   Forum Home   Help Search  


Rubinstein by the Rubinsteins

Hedonist and altruist at the same time, favorite of the gods and philanthropist, melancholic and sanguine serious artist, a gifted musician and brilliant pianist, egomaniac and family pet.
The recent documentary film about the life and work of Arthur Rubinstein, brings to life the personality of a great artist and demonstrates what his art is all about. Read more >>


Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: How much do YOU charge?  (Read 9379 times)
alissa14
PS Silver Member
Newbie
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 3


« on: January 03, 2010, 10:19:54 PM »

This is my 7th year to teach piano and voice lessons and I'm looking to give myself a raise.  I work full-time as an elementary school teacher and have my bachelors degree in music education.  How long have you been teaching and how much do you charge?  What do you think would be a fair rate for me to charge?  I do not have to pay for studio time so everything from my lessons is profit.

Thanks for your thoughts!!!
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged

Alissa
canardroti
PS Silver Member
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 124


« Reply #1 on: January 08, 2010, 09:27:09 AM »

We need more detail, where are you located? This will determine how much people charge around your area.
I have been teaching piano for 4 years and about to get a Bacherlor's in music education.
I charge 40$/ hour and I live in southern California.
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged
penguinlover
PS Silver Member
Sr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 475


« Reply #2 on: January 14, 2010, 06:51:55 AM »

I live in So Cal also, but in a poorer area.  That would be far too high a price for my people!  A local music studio in the area is charging $75 a month, but I don't know how many students they are attracting.  I charge considerably less than that.  I have even bartered for lessons when money was really tight.
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged
jenny62
PS Gold Member
Newbie
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4


« Reply #3 on: March 17, 2010, 07:20:05 PM »

It's definitely true that lesson rates vary greatly!  I live in the Chicago area and even from adjacent towns, rates could vary.  Lesson rates are usually dictated by what people are willing to pay, and not necessarily just based on one's education, experience and reputation.  I know a fantastic teacher who charges almost half of what I charge because she lives in a poor area.  On the other hand, there are teachers with much less educational background and experience but can charge the same as me because that is the going rate in my area.  Ask around and see what other teachers in your area with similar background charges.  A few things I've learned from my business oriented brother-in-law.  Raise your rates every year, even if it's only a dollar or 50 cents, and charge what you think you are worth, even if it may be a little higher than the going rate.  If you value your time and services, others will eventually follow suit.
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged
kookaburra
PS Silver Member
Jr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 73


« Reply #4 on: March 21, 2010, 08:42:11 PM »

I am a student, but this is something I have also wondered about.

Prices definitely differ based on location, expertise and whether the teacher is trying to make a living. My first violin lessons were a dollar each. no kidding. that was because the lady just liked to teach, the area was very poor (sometimes kids wouldn't come because they didn't have enough money!) , it was just enough to cover copier paper, I guess. I have  had $20/half hour lessons with someone who had to make a profit, but also $7/hour+ lessons with someone who, I realized later, could have been charging WAY more, with their knowledge, and probably needed the money too. Some really don't care about the money. Students will take the best deal for the best teacher, so it's whatever you can get away with, without losing people you already have. (if you figure out the going rate and charge just below it, we students will definitely notice.  Smiley

I have found there is no such thing as a standard rate. (where I live, there's plenty of haggling and bartering, too.)
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged

No trees were harmed in the sending of this message; however, a large number of electrons were terribly inconvenienced.
girlatthepiano
PS Silver Member
Newbie
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 1


« Reply #5 on: April 06, 2010, 02:14:29 AM »

I live in North New Jersey and I paid about $70 - $75/hr. My piano teacher was great and we had great rapport. So to me, it was well-worth it. Plus several other piano teachers in the area had similar rates.

I started teaching about 5 years ago when I was a freshman in high school. And I charge anywhere between $20 - $30/hr, although I have taken pie as payment before. I know there are people my age who charge and more and less than I do.

I usually keep an eye on the local newspapers and community bulletin boards to get an idea of the rates in my area.
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged
Bob
PS Silver Member
Sr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 11953


« Reply #6 on: April 06, 2010, 02:18:42 PM »

That's some expensive pie.  Haha.

I agree about raising it year.  Cost of living.  3-4% each year or whatever it is.
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged

Time spent with pianos is never wasted.
adaubre
PS Silver Member
Jr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 49


« Reply #7 on: April 07, 2010, 12:51:00 AM »

This is my 7th year to teach piano and voice lessons and I'm looking to give myself a raise.  I work full-time as an elementary school teacher and have my bachelors degree in music education.  How long have you been teaching and how much do you charge?  What do you think would be a fair rate for me to charge?  I do not have to pay for studio time so everything from my lessons is profit.

A friend of mine who teaches piano charges 71 an hour (don't ask me why she wouldn't round it off to 75...).  She teaches mostly kids between the ages of 7 and 13.  Not sure if its different for adult classes.  She is considered a very good teacher and has an excellent rep so I'm sure that is a factor in what someone can ask.
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged
tdow
PS Silver Member
Newbie
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 17


« Reply #8 on: April 15, 2010, 05:28:33 AM »

When I set my lesson rates the one thing I try to avoid is being the "cheap" alternative. Why? Because cheap lessons do not mean “good” lessons. And what people really want are good lessons… in fact they want great lessons. And they are willing to pay money to get them.

Parents want to save money at the gas pump, and they want to save money at the grocery store, but their number one priority when it comes to piano lessons is NOT saving money.

Because of the negative connotations that are carried with the word “cheap”, charging less than the going rate for piano lessons can be detrimental to your piano teaching business. It will not attract more students. Instead, it will send the message to parents and potential clients that you have nothing special to offer except price.

So… am I telling you to go for the gold and set your price sky high? Absolutely not! Instead, find out what the competition is charging and charge exactly the same. Then, when it’s time to compete for students, wow the world with piano lessons that are creative, passionate, innovative and insanely enjoyable.

The Art and Business of Piano Teaching
www.teachpianotoday.com
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged
max747
PS Silver Member
Newbie
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 14


« Reply #9 on: June 13, 2010, 06:20:55 AM »

I have been playing the piano for 9 years and I have had many teachers.my two best teachers cost the most and the third most. Charge what u are worth. If u honestly care about the progress of ur students work hard with them and help them achieve what they want such as winning competitions or improving technically or anything else.if u help them achieve this then u should allow itself to charge more.also think about investing in 1or2 talented and hardworking students with extra and/or free lessons-if these students gain local fame more students may take lessons with u   
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged

Seattle International piano festival search it up on google
honeywill
PS Gold Member
Jr. Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 44


« Reply #10 on: June 13, 2010, 05:47:16 PM »

You can also justify a raise each year on the basis of your increasing experience.
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged
sadistic_leprechaun
PS Silver Member
Newbie
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 1


« Reply #11 on: June 19, 2010, 06:01:03 PM »

I live in South Florida, and I charge between $30 (old students grandfathered in) and $45 (new students) per one hour lesson, and collect for 4 lessons in advance.  I teach a few of them who are aspiring to be college music students some advanced things like improvisation and one of them big-band arranging, but I don't charge any more or less for those things.  I am able to maintain 30+ students with word-of-mouth advertising with no problem.
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged
steponme
PS Silver Member
Newbie
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 19


« Reply #12 on: July 09, 2010, 12:22:14 AM »

I am a student but I just felt like sharing too.

I pay $160 a month for my lessons. (I live in the Bay Area, California).

The teacher I am working with is also the piano teacher at the local community college and I also plan on taking his class there (that would be like free 2 hours of lessons as I only have to pay about $2 to enroll into his class).  Roll Eyes
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged

- Intermediate student here!
Pieces that I'm currently studying (in order of priority):
1. Debussy - Arabesque no. 1
2. Mozart - 12 Variations
3. Debussy - Clair de Lune
4. Beethoven - Moonlight
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  


Need more info or help?


Search pianostreet.com - the web's largest resource of information about piano playing:



 
Jump to:  


Most popular classical piano composers:
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2006-2007, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!

o