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The Art of Constructed Ecstasy – Scriabin Documentary

This documentary on the unconventional life and ground-breaking music of Russian pianist and composer Alexander Scriabin sheds light on the mystical ideas which inspired him. Read more >>

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Author Topic: bach chorales -- fingering  (Read 1350 times)
misha1
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« on: November 27, 2010, 02:23:42 AM »

I was wondering about the fingering for the bach chorales.  I am playing the first one.  The intervals are at time too large for my hands.  Is there a technique to playing them or should I just leave notes out?
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birba
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« Reply #1 on: November 27, 2010, 01:42:25 PM »

Could you be more specific?  Which chorale are you talking about and is it an arrangement or for organ.
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keyboardclass
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« Reply #2 on: November 27, 2010, 02:59:07 PM »

Some people suggest they're good for sightreading.  As you are finding out they're not.  I'd find something else.
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Congratulations Mr. Graffman!

In a musical career that has spanned seven of those 8 1/2 decades, Gary Graffman has experienced everything from entering the prestigious Curtis Institute at the age of seven, the accidental, self-inflicted destruction of his right hand’s dexterity to becoming one of the most prominent educators in the US. Read more >>

birba
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« Reply #3 on: November 27, 2010, 08:42:09 PM »

What makes you think he's using them for sight-reading?
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misha1
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« Reply #4 on: November 28, 2010, 03:35:55 AM »

Hi! yes, I will be more specific. The music I have is Bach, Four-part Chorales, 1 -99, for keyboard.  The first one is titled Aus meines Herzens Grunde.    The very first measure has a G and a 10th up is a B in the bass clef.   Same thing in measures 4 and 5.  In measure 6 all 3 counts are intervals of a 10th.  My thoughts are to just play the bottom note.  Any suggestions? Thanks
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keyboardclass
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« Reply #5 on: November 28, 2010, 06:18:56 AM »

What you have is an extract from 371 Harmonized Chorales and 69 Chorale Melodies with figured bass by Albert Riemenschneider.  Its usually just referred to as the 'Riemenschneider'.  To play them you need some understanding from Bach's Three Part Inventions - it's here that you learn how to take more than one part per hand.  In this specific case play the B with the right.
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birba
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« Reply #6 on: November 28, 2010, 08:13:48 AM »

Thank you keyboardclass!  Then they are the ones I thought they were.  And, yes, they use them for sightreading, too.  Maybe not for beginners, but they can be very useful.
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The New Concept: Scores for All Stages of Learning

On the recent Music Education Expo in London, Piano Street presented a new concept for sheet music publication. Depending on your own level of experience and where you are in the learning process of a particular piece, you may need fingering, pedal markings, practice and performance tips, or perhaps the right opposite - a clean Urtext score. Read more >>

keyboardclass
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« Reply #7 on: November 28, 2010, 08:54:54 AM »

It just isn't that simple though.  Bach was the first major keyboard pedagogue - look at his sons, 5 out of six became formidable keyboard players (the six was mentally disabled but still supposedly played).   His secret?  He was methodical.  First one part each hand, then three between them, then more.  Playing real three part music was an art.  He understood that and delivered it with great care.  Those who 'leap' into multiple part playing without understanding will falter.  That's why I say it's unwise advice to suggest they're good for early sight reading - advice often given out.
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misha1
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« Reply #8 on: November 28, 2010, 08:50:53 PM »

Thank you Birba and Keyboardclass!!  I actually have been playing the top note of the bass with right hand.  And I will look at the 3 part inventions. 
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