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New Recordings: Schubert – Six Moments Musicaux op 94

The Moments Musicaux were published only a few months before Schubert’s death in 1828. Most of them were composed during 1827 or 1828, with the exception of Nos. 3 and 6, dating from 1823 and 1824 respectively. Read more >>

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Author Topic: SKIP A GRADE  (Read 616 times)
supapiano225
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« on: March 10, 2011, 01:40:43 AM »

Okay this is my plan.
while my teachers preparing me for grade one im
going to get really good and see if i can skip a grade(or two.)

im pretty sure i can manage grade 2 or 3.

what do you think?

any tips or help???
 by the way the pieces im playing are
chopin prelude in e minor
mozart minuet in f
chopin opus posth a minor
field nocturne no 5(till the hard bit.)
beethoven german dance in c
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gradedpiano
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« Reply #1 on: March 10, 2011, 01:19:28 PM »

chopins prelude in eminor is around grade 5, its quite difficult musically, not so much technically. I believe grade 3 is a good place to start for you.
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ongaku_oniko
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« Reply #2 on: March 10, 2011, 01:37:14 PM »

What is this "Grade" everyone talks about and assume everyone else knows?

From my little knowledge about music, people use different grading systems everywhere. Is there an international standard for "Grade"? If not, how are we supposed to know what "Grade" you're talking about?
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gradedpiano
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« Reply #3 on: March 10, 2011, 09:18:48 PM »

there are different grading systems but there not that different, everyone seems to get annoyed if you dont specify the grading system ( im not saying you are though) but there is no real difference. For example, moonlight sonata movement 1 is grade 5 in ABRSM i believe but in the LCM system its a grade 6 i believe, it really doesnt matter because they are all similar
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supapiano225
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« Reply #4 on: March 11, 2011, 01:04:55 AM »

ive been playing for three years and this is my
first examination.
Any tips?
also do they not let you pass if you look at your hands?
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ongaku_oniko
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« Reply #5 on: March 11, 2011, 01:28:23 AM »

I am certainly annoyed by this question. Who is they? I know RCME don't even look at how you play, but what examination system are you doing? If you don't even tell us that, how do we know anything?

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supapiano225
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« Reply #6 on: March 11, 2011, 04:53:37 AM »

Im doing AMEB(Australia) examinations, there kinda the same as ABRSM.
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gradedpiano
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« Reply #7 on: March 11, 2011, 03:33:06 PM »

is does not matter if you look at your hands but its best to try and avoid it, this is what im woking on at the moment
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hodgeinator55
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« Reply #8 on: March 11, 2011, 07:33:31 PM »

ive been playing for three years and this is my
first examination.
Any tips?
also do they not let you pass if you look at your hands?
Well, in my experience of music examinations, I nealways take a check on my hands whilst playing the piece to check the fingering etc, and I 've passed very well. It shouldn't really matter as long as the pieces and scales/arpegios/broken chords are played well. Smiley
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supapiano225
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« Reply #9 on: March 12, 2011, 02:16:57 AM »

if i get a bit of fingering wrong but play the piece well
will i not pass?
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raintree
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« Reply #10 on: March 17, 2011, 07:59:08 PM »

At my RCM exam I played with my back to the examiners. They didn't look at my hands at all. Is this typical?
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thinkgreenlovepiano
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« Reply #11 on: March 17, 2011, 08:08:29 PM »

I'm pretty sure it is, in most exam systems.
Of course they won't fail you if you look at your hands.

My teacher told me that in the worst case senario, if I forgot all my fingerings, I could play all my scales with 12 12 12 fingering, and no one would care as long as it sounded good.  She was kidding, but you get the point.
And of course using the correct fingering is important, otherwise its easy to slip up and make mistakes. But you won't get marked on your fingering!

One tip from me is make sure you listen to the examiner correctly. If they ask for an A major scale, repeat "A major?"... just in case you heard wrong and they really wanted A minor.
Also, don't be nervous. Examiners want you to do well, they aren't there to try and fail you! They try and look for what was good as well as what was bad. Just practise hard and do your best. Smiley
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"A painter paints pictures on canvas. But musicians paint their pictures on silence."
~Leopold Stokowski
supapiano225
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« Reply #12 on: March 18, 2011, 03:13:49 AM »

my teacher has just decided to put me on grade two instead.
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