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Live Streamed Piano Recital with Murray McLachlan

A new piano recital series has been launched in Stockholm this fall. The first recital, with pianist Peter Jablonski took place on September 15 and today, you can hear British pianist Murray McLachlan play live from The Royal Academy of Fine Arts. Read more >>

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Author Topic: Chopin - Nocturne op 9 no 2  (Read 2310 times)
carbe
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« on: March 14, 2011, 09:32:20 PM »

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BaLWNDmJKxc" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BaLWNDmJKxc</a>

I am playing Chopin's Nocturne op 9 no 2 in Eb.
I wish I could record this piece on a grand piano, but this is what I had at the moment.
Hope you like it, enjoy!
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I\'m a classical, boogie woogie and pop/rock pianist.

piano sheet music of Nocturne
grouchomarx
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« Reply #1 on: March 19, 2011, 12:05:22 PM »

Hi

You obviously know the notes, which is most of the hard work. Now you need to start thinking about the dynamics. I don't know if it's just the digital piano or your playing but there isn't a lot of dynamic contrast. For example at the very end where it goes from piano to forte(con forza) you play it at the same volume throughout. You should also increase the tempo. This is followed by ff, which you play very softly.

Also the left hand chords should always decrease in volume, so that the first note (with the dot above it) should be the loudest, then the two following should decrease in volume.

I suggest you look at the sheet music and try to more thoroughly incorporate the dynamic markings. You can also listen to some of the great recordings on youtube, Rubinstein is my personal favorite.
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carbe
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« Reply #2 on: March 20, 2011, 10:13:01 AM »

Hi

You obviously know the notes, which is most of the hard work. Now you need to start thinking about the dynamics. I don't know if it's just the digital piano or your playing but there isn't a lot of dynamic contrast. For example at the very end where it goes from piano to forte(con forza) you play it at the same volume throughout. You should also increase the tempo. This is followed by ff, which you play very softly.

Also the left hand chords should always decrease in volume, so that the first note (with the dot above it) should be the loudest, then the two following should decrease in volume.

I suggest you look at the sheet music and try to more thoroughly incorporate the dynamic markings. You can also listen to some of the great recordings on youtube, Rubinstein is my personal favorite.

Hi! Thanks for your comment.
I can blame a little on the digital piano, it's harder to play with dynamic on a digital piano than a grand piano. But mostly I can just blame myself.
Thanks for your advice, I'll check the notes again. Then I'll record a new version on a grand piano!
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