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New Chopin Photo Found!

The Swiss physicist and Chopin connoisseur Alain Kohler, already known for discovering in a private German home a Pleyel piano that once belonged to Frédéric Chopin, has made another sensational find. Kohler, together with Gilles Bencimon of Radio France Internationale, recently announced that they have unearthed a new, previously unknown photograph of Chopin. Read more >>

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Author Topic: "Ossia" in Chopin's first ballade  (Read 3204 times)
klik11
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« on: April 30, 2011, 07:18:52 AM »



Why does it mean? What should I play at the second bar?
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piano sheet music of Ballade 1
philb
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« Reply #1 on: April 30, 2011, 07:49:32 AM »

Either or, You can play the standard or you can play the ossia bar.
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klik11
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« Reply #2 on: April 30, 2011, 08:08:07 AM »

I see. Any recommendation?
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quantum
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« Reply #3 on: April 30, 2011, 02:21:34 PM »

I like the standard version.
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Made a Liszt. Need new Handel's for Soler panel & Alkan foil. Will Faure Stein on the way to pick up Mendels' sohn. Josquin get Wolfgangs Schu with Clara. Gone Chopin, I'll be Bach
54545
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« Reply #4 on: April 30, 2011, 02:45:07 PM »

The ossia was not actually written by Chopin, rather it was added by the german editors in the first german edition. In the autograph, E-flat is the correct reading as is the french first edition. (see Mikuli's explanation).
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pianisten1989
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« Reply #5 on: April 30, 2011, 03:40:53 PM »

The e-flat is kind of.. off. From C minor to a E-flat with a D in the bass (e-flat major maj7). G minor makes a lot more sense. Though, you will be kicked in the family-fortune of you play d instead of e-flat...
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klik11
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« Reply #6 on: May 01, 2011, 02:53:43 AM »

The ossia was not actually written by Chopin, rather it was added by the german editors in the first german edition.
Excuse me but... in what right? Why would anyone play something that has been added by some editor instead of the real Chopin?
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cygnusdei
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« Reply #7 on: May 01, 2011, 03:42:09 AM »

On the next page the motif returns with a fuller harmony. I think Chopin meant the e♭either as a passing tone or a tonic of major seventh chord.


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lelle
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« Reply #8 on: May 03, 2011, 10:30:52 PM »

I think the e-flat should be played. It was the original notation, it sounds better (in my opinion), and it creates more tension, making the dominant resolving into the tonic in the next bars all the more satisfying. Playing the d makes the passage sound flat and a lot less interesting.
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