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Bach Project Takes Off from the Street: "Recording the 48"

Each of the two volumes of Bach’s Well-tempered Clavier contains one prelude and one fugue in every major and minor key. Often called “the 48”, or the “Old Testament” of piano music, it is perhaps the most important keyboard work of all time. The first stage of a new recording of the complete set by pianist Martin Sturfält is now available from Piano Street for listening and downloading; seven of the Preludes & Fugues from Book 1 as well as two from Book 2. Whatever you are doing at the moment, take a three minute break and refresh your mind with the free sample we offer of the Prelude and Fugue in E-flat from Book 2. Read more >>

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Author Topic: Which Digital Piano Should I Buy?  (Read 4343 times)
theoperator
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« on: May 26, 2011, 11:42:22 PM »

Hey there, need some advice

I've been playing piano for about 11 years. I've been playing on an old Newcombe which has gone terribly out of tune. For the past year I've been practicing on a Yamaha PSR-270 keyboard. I feel pretty suffocated with only 61 keys to work with and the non graded keys give me nightmares. My Newcombe was just too out of tune for me to work with and I've tried getting it tuned professionally, with no avail. Its just too old. I've been thinking about getting a digital piano. So my question is this: What digital piano should I get? And if I do get one, should I sell my upright Newcombe? My price range is about 500-700, less if possible.
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john90
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« Reply #1 on: May 27, 2011, 06:08:47 PM »

How often were you getting the Newcombe tuned?  Smiley

If you have left it too long (a few years), when the tuner comes, they hear it so far out, and know it will take 6 visits+ for it to settle, with you not happy in between, that adds to more than the value of the piano.

The odds are you could get it to a stable state yourself, with a tuning handle. If you get it more or less OK, and stable for 6 months, you could call the tuner back, and then make any minor adjustments between visits yourself.
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theoperator
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« Reply #2 on: May 28, 2011, 01:31:52 AM »

I've already decided I want a digital piano. My main question was which one should I get? Not "How should I go about tuning my Newcombe?"
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Piano Vintage – Italian Excellence Bringing Old Steinways Back to Life

One of the most interesting exhibitors at the Cremonafiere Exhibition’s piano part – the so called CremonaPianoforte – this fall was a company and and workshop called Piano Vintage. The company performs a type of restoration dictated from the work philosophy and experience of the “Steinway Academy”. Read more >>

john90
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« Reply #3 on: May 28, 2011, 06:03:42 AM »

You have a Yamaha PSR-270, which is touch sensitive, MIDI keyboard. Yamaha is a decent make. Have you got touch sensitivity turned on?

Your keyboard is described thus:
"Portable Grand Piano

These keyboards feature Yamaha's exclusive Portable Grand™ function. By pressing the Portable Grand button, the keyboard will exit any other function or mode and set itself up for playing the special stereo-sampled Grand Piano voice..." It then goes on about Superb Sound Quality.

I have owned a lower PSR model than this, and always lusted after a Midi version with touch sensitivity, like yours, for its portability. You will get good money for it on ebay.

The piano Midi Piano samplers are getting better all the time. I use a weighted 88 note keyboard with a computer for sound output via Midi. My Roland digital keyboard would have cost the first owner between 2 and 3 thousand dollars. I paid 300 for it on an auction site. You can tell it is not a cheap DP by the feel, weight. It is well made. It is a better feel than my PSR did. This approach vastly simplifies things. Ignore the sound in shops, you don't need the salesdude to plug it in even. Just go for feel. Korg, Yamaha, Roland, Kawi, perhaps Technics.

DPs are a big let down, especially if you play Scott Joplin, as your ID suggests. They are a bit better with classical stuff.

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theoperator
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« Reply #4 on: May 28, 2011, 07:26:33 AM »

Sorry, where does it say that I play Scott Joplin stuff? And how are DPs a big letdown?
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steveb48
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« Reply #5 on: May 28, 2011, 09:19:31 AM »

Hi, I'm no expert but have been looking myself.  There is a really good website at ukpianos.co.uk, the guy is very helpful. Let us know what you go for. I'm tempted by the Yamaha clavinova or a Roland
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roseli
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« Reply #6 on: May 28, 2011, 05:19:01 PM »

I have a yamaha p-85. If you're poor (like me Tongue) this is a good option.
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Com dinheiro, língua e latim, vai-se do mundo até o fim.


The New Concept: Scores for All Stages of Learning

On the recent Music Education Expo in London, Piano Street presented a new concept for sheet music publication. Depending on your own level of experience and where you are in the learning process of a particular piece, you may need fingering, pedal markings, practice and performance tips, or perhaps the right opposite - a clean Urtext score. Read more >>

john90
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« Reply #7 on: May 29, 2011, 08:47:32 AM »

About Scott Joplin, I always thought your username was a coded reference to Scott Joplin's "The Entertainer".  Shocked Nothing digital (so far) gives the same kicks as playing Scott Joplin too fast on an out of tune upright with unregulated damping, not for me anyway.

You have a reasonable touch sensitive Yamaha electronic keyboard. Apart from only 61 keys, I don't think a DP will be earthshakingly better, probably somewhere between what you have and the Newcombe when it was in better shape. I agree with Roseli, something like the P85 will be as good as the next DP and probably better value if you are set on buying new.
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theoperator
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« Reply #8 on: May 31, 2011, 06:15:09 AM »

In your guys' opinions, is the stand worth the extra $99? I have one of those "X" shaped stands for keyboards, but I don't have a sustain pedal. Do DP's usually come with pedals? And I've heard of the issue of pedals being pushed back by the foot if you don't have a stand. Anyone experience this issue? Should I invest for the stand as well?
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john90
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« Reply #9 on: May 31, 2011, 08:48:30 AM »

I think the X stand looks cool, is adjustable, easy to transport and move when you need space, and works better with computer setups for wire access. If you want to play standing up, you can move out the pedal too. Yes, the pedals can move which is a downside too.. You end up with more of a stage piano feel, more of an instrument in its own right, than a simulation of an acoustic.
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bleicher
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« Reply #10 on: May 31, 2011, 09:04:12 AM »

Digital pianos are a better imitation of a piano than digital keyboards. Digital pianos are designed to sound and feel as much like a real piano as they can, whereas digital keyboards are designed to have lots of functions and features which make them useful for songwriting and playing in bands, but at the expense of a realistic piano touch and sound.

At the price range you mentioned, I recommend you try the Korg SP250 and the Yamaha P95. I think there are also some good Kawai ones in that price range.

Personally I don't like X stands as they get in the way of my knees. I also prefer a stand which you can attach the pedal to, as otherwise I find the pedal runs away across the floor while I'm using it. The Korg I've mentioned above has good stand for both those reasons. Otherwise I'd recommend the Quiklok WS550 stand which is very stable, doesn't get in the way of my knees, and folds up. You can't attach the pedal to it though, so I still have to use gaffer tape to stick the pedal to the floor.
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The New Concept: Scores for All Stages of Learning

On the recent Music Education Expo in London, Piano Street presented a new concept for sheet music publication. Depending on your own level of experience and where you are in the learning process of a particular piece, you may need fingering, pedal markings, practice and performance tips, or perhaps the right opposite - a clean Urtext score. Read more >>

toner22
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« Reply #11 on: June 01, 2011, 01:05:50 AM »

what ya talking about? The cn series and the mp6 have the same feeling keybed.

Anyway 5 to 700 singles it out. Kawai is out unless you found a used one, maybe an mp5.

Roland im pretty sure is out so that leaves yamaha and casio. Maybe a korg.

In that price range id say a p95 for yamaha though it sucks cause for a lil more you could have the GH action instead of standard, with a better sound chip in the 155 or the cp series.

Casio, and korg not really my bag. Never liked em much.
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bleicher
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« Reply #12 on: June 01, 2011, 08:53:20 AM »

The only way to decide is find a shop that stocks them all and try them out. I don't know about anywhere else in the world but in London I can recommend going to Rose Morris on Denmark Street.
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zerozero
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« Reply #13 on: June 11, 2011, 01:48:27 PM »

Have you tried plugging oyur keyboard into a PC and using a VST or standlaone Piano such as TrePianos (which is really excellent - try the demo).
There are two aspects to a 'good digital' the quality of the physical keyboard - its responsiveness (which these days ifs often good), and then there is the sound it makes. In a good samples paino each note has a number of different samples sampled at PP p PF MF F FF FFF  - Different levels. Good digitals also have string resonance when you hit more than none note.

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theoperator
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« Reply #14 on: June 12, 2011, 06:20:40 AM »

I came across this:
http://vancouver.en.craigslist.ca/nvn/msg/2427712308.html
I emailed the person for details and he said that its the Yamaha YDP-113 and he originally bought it for $1500. He's offering it for $600 and I thought that was a great deal! I've read up on this piano and am getting mixed reviews. Some say that its good, some say its bad. My question is this: Should I purchase this piano for 600? I want a good, affordable DP that will last me.
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theoperator
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« Reply #15 on: June 12, 2011, 06:50:03 AM »

Either that^ or,
a yamaha p-85 for $450.

I've been getting mixed reviews about the P-85 also. Many say its just a beginners DP, while others say its probably the best DP you can get for the price. What should I get?
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theoperator
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« Reply #16 on: June 14, 2011, 10:46:11 PM »

bump
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The New Concept: Scores for All Stages of Learning

On the recent Music Education Expo in London, Piano Street presented a new concept for sheet music publication. Depending on your own level of experience and where you are in the learning process of a particular piece, you may need fingering, pedal markings, practice and performance tips, or perhaps the right opposite - a clean Urtext score. Read more >>

leonbloy
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« Reply #17 on: June 14, 2011, 10:57:28 PM »

I'm a (amateur) guitar player and I've always been interested in keyboard playing, I got one Yamaha PSR-500 some years ago, but i couldnt make much progress with it (no teacher and little discipline, I must add). The keys "sensitivity"  didnt satisfied me, the lack of weight puts too much distance from a real piano. About 2 years ago I finally decided to buy a digital piano, with weighted keys. I got one of the most cheap, a Casio Privia 120 - but it was a totally different experience, I could really make some progress with it and enjoy playing. You should try it to check your sensation (some feel the Privia keys too heavy) but if you feel confortable, I'd go for it - or something better if you can afford it :-)
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Hernán
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countrymath
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« Reply #18 on: June 14, 2011, 10:58:18 PM »

P95 is better.

Maybe the best on your price range.

I still think you should save for a better model, like kawai CN33, CAXX, Roland FP4f or FP7F.
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  • Mozart-Sonata KV310 - A minor
theoperator
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« Reply #19 on: June 15, 2011, 05:11:55 AM »

P95 is better.

Maybe the best on your price range.

I still think you should save for a better model, like kawai CN33, CAXX, Roland FP4f or FP7F.

P95? do u mean the P85 which is the one i was talking about?
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countrymath
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« Reply #20 on: June 15, 2011, 11:17:49 AM »

P95? do u mean the P85 which is the one i was talking about?

no, P95. Its newer then p85
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  • Mozart-Sonata KV310 - A minor
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