Piano Forum logo
April 25, 2014, 02:35:08 AM *
Welcome Guest!
You are currently viewing our forum as a guest with limited access.
If you join our community, you will be able to access member-only sections and features.
Registration as a Silver Member is simple, fast, and completely free.
Join us for free here and receive a special welcome gift!
   Forum Home   Help Search  


Improvisations – New Forum Section

In the history of Western music, from the medieval until the romantic period, improvisation was an important skill for all composers and keyboard players. Bach, Handel, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Chopin, Liszt, and many others were celebrated for their ability to improvise. Read more >>

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Prokofiev Sonata No. 2 Scherzo  (Read 311 times)
88keysyamaha
PS Silver Member
Newbie
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 3


« on: December 12, 2011, 01:07:49 PM »

I am working on the Sonata No. 2 by Prokofiev and have encountered a question in the Scherzo movement.  On measures 12 and 14 in the treble clef there is a line going from d to d#(reading bass staff notes in treble clef in mm12).  In measure 14 the same line indicated from b to b#.  What does this mean?
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged
haydnseeker
PS Gold Member
Jr. Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 63


« Reply #1 on: December 12, 2011, 11:29:45 PM »

It's a way of indicating that the natural and sharp are both played together.  Thus in b12, the sixth RH quaver is a 3-note chord D natural - D sharp - C.  The other instances (bars 10, 14, 25 and the corresponding places in the reprise) are similar.

I don't know what edition you have, but in mine (Boosey and Hawkes 'authentic' edition) these chords are notated with an oblique stem running from the beam to one of the noteheads (though the oblique is missing in b12 and has been very clumsily added in b10).

There are other solutions to this notational problem.  Consult Music Notation by Gardner Read for a full explanation.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Music-Notation-Manual-Practice-Crescendo/dp/0800854535/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1323731823&sr=1-1

Messiaen often has chords of this kind but doesn't use the extra stem, e.g. in Vingt Regards no. 15, at the second quaver a chord E natural - A natural - A sharp is notated on a single stem: there are two A noteheads, one either side of the stem, and the one to the left of the stem is preceded by both a sharp and a natural.
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged
88keysyamaha
PS Silver Member
Newbie
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 3


« Reply #2 on: December 13, 2011, 04:06:30 AM »

Thank you so much.  That answered my question and that is how I have been practicing it.  My edition is International Music Company.
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged


The New Concept: Scores for All Stages of Learning

On the recent Music Education Expo in London, Piano Street presented a new concept for sheet music publication. Depending on your own level of experience and where you are in the learning process of a particular piece, you may need fingering, pedal markings, practice and performance tips, or perhaps the right opposite - a clean Urtext score. Read more >>

Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  


Most popular classical piano composers:
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2006-2007, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!

o