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Author Topic: Grace note in Fur Elise m 28  (Read 5032 times)
pianos1
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« on: December 18, 2011, 03:25:31 PM »

Grace note in Fur Elise m 28

In measure 28 of Fur Elise there is a grace note Bb followed by four 32nd notes.  Below, the grace note is indicated by "bb".  The two rows indicate right and left hand.

bb A  G   A   Bb (32nds)
    C       A

Is the timing of the Bb grace note as symbolized above, before the beat (LH note C), or:

    bb-A G   A   Bb
    C          A

I tried to attach a score of these examples.
where "bb-A" indicates 64th notes, and "G   A   Bb" indicates 32nd notes?


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piano sheet music of Für Elise
pianoplayjl
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« Reply #1 on: December 18, 2011, 03:38:06 PM »

I haven't played this piece but from similar stuff I played through I reckon I might make something out of this. Generally I would play the grace note before the LH note C but emphasized. So yes, play the timing of the Bb grace note as symbolized above. It'll be interesting to at least try your idea though because most versions I hear are played just as the score is written. Either way it'll make no difference in the music quality. Hope this helps.

JL
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pianowolfi
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« Reply #2 on: December 18, 2011, 08:44:06 PM »

I play that before the beat. However, some persons may decide to do otherwise. To me it makes more sense if you play it before.
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autodidact
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« Reply #3 on: December 18, 2011, 11:52:40 PM »

It always seems that different people seem to have different interpretations of ornaments, but I play that grace note before.
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nyiregyhazi
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« Reply #4 on: December 19, 2011, 03:16:27 PM »

The general "rule" is to play grace notes on the beat. However, with the following notes being so short, in this case it would make a complete mess of the rhythm and articulation. The shorter the notes are after a grace note, the less plausible it is to play the grace note on the beat- as there's simply no room for it. Elsewhere, it would be most typical to play grace notes on the beat.
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pianos1
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« Reply #5 on: December 21, 2011, 07:30:09 PM »

All the answers were appreciated.

My experimentation with every plausible possibility indicated that the supposed on-the-beat appoggiatura rule distorts the rhythm.  Doing so leads to unreasonable difficulty in playing 64th notes to fit the grace note within the beat, as seen in my example.  It's more feasible to play the five notes as a quintuplet, but it still sounds strange.





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ionian_tinnear
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« Reply #6 on: December 21, 2011, 08:19:48 PM »

The real question here is why the first bar shown in the image is different than the third.  The first bar should be played with the appoggiatura on the beat, which is then played the same as bar three..
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