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The New Concept: Scores for All Stages of Learning

On the recent Music Education Expo in London, Piano Street presented a new concept for sheet music publication. Depending on your own level of experience and where you are in the learning process of a particular piece, you may need fingering, pedal markings, practice and performance tips, or perhaps the right opposite - a clean Urtext score. Read more >>

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Author Topic: Che va piano, va sano.  (Read 575 times)
prometheus44
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« on: February 07, 2012, 05:22:17 AM »

Hi!

Hopefully a similar question hasn't been posted yet, and it if has, I apologize in advance. There's some piano wisdom to gather from the plethora of "what's an easy piece to play" threads, but anyway...

So to the point (somewhat). I started playing about 3 months ago, practicing anywhere from 1 to 5 hours everyday. I can now play The Entertainer relatively flawlessly (technically, probably not aesthetically yet :-) ) and have just finished learning Mozart's Turkish March. I make few mistakes on that one too, but can play it in its entirety.
A highly achieved, self taught player and friend recently told me that his worst mistake has been to start with overly difficult pieces. He said the best would be to focus entirely on scales and short/easy pieces for at least a few months, in order to gain better flexibility and strength before tackling harder pieces.

What do you think? Stay away from hard pieces even if one feels they're playable, focusing on easy pieces/scales at first? Or play whatever one feels comfortable with?

Looking forward to your insights!
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birba
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« Reply #1 on: February 07, 2012, 06:34:53 AM »

I just wanted to correct your title.  CHI va piano, va lontano - At least that's the way I've always heard it.  Slow but sure wins the race, I guess you could translate it.  Anyhoo...
I think you need both.  You need scale and easy pieces and you need one piece just slightly out of your reach - probably something you've always wanted to learn but never had the nerve to start.  It gives you stimulus.
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candlelightpiano
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« Reply #2 on: February 07, 2012, 06:41:54 AM »

Like my Fantasie Impromptu?
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Albéniz – Asturias and 20 other piano pieces

Even though Isaac Albéniz actually never composed any music for guitar much of his piano music is part of the standard guitar repertoire. Asturias (Leyenda), the fifth movement from Suite Espańola, opus 47, is one example. Read more >>

prometheus44
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« Reply #3 on: February 07, 2012, 06:42:41 AM »

In France at least, I've always quoted and heard "Chi va piano, va sano".
The actual saying is "Chi va piano, va sano; chi va sano, va lontano."
He who goes steadily is healthy, he who is healthy will go far?

Anyway. I think you're right. I'll try to spend more time on scales!
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birba
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« Reply #4 on: February 07, 2012, 06:54:50 AM »

I stand corrected.  That sounds like the complete expression.
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costicina
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« Reply #5 on: February 07, 2012, 07:51:47 AM »

As an Italian native speaker, I feel entitled  to worm into this matter: the right say is: Chi va piano, va sano e va lontano" (there is a rhyme, too). Birba can translate this in English better than me  Wink Wink Wink Wink
Marg
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birba
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« Reply #6 on: February 07, 2012, 08:48:04 AM »

Like I said, slow and steady wins the race.  I think Aesop had a fable of the race between the hare and the tortoise.
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The New Concept: Scores for All Stages of Learning

On the recent Music Education Expo in London, Piano Street presented a new concept for sheet music publication. Depending on your own level of experience and where you are in the learning process of a particular piece, you may need fingering, pedal markings, practice and performance tips, or perhaps the right opposite - a clean Urtext score. Read more >>

iansinclair
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« Reply #7 on: February 07, 2012, 03:47:06 PM »

I might add, though... that one must ask first, why am I doing this?  If it is to become an accomplished public performer, that's one thing -- and you do indeed want to spend a good bit of time (not all of it; you'll lose interest and quit) on technical studies.  On the other hand, if one is doing it to please one's self, then... please yourself!
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Ian
birba
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« Reply #8 on: February 07, 2012, 06:17:51 PM »

But I think you can please yourself more if you acquire a certain amount of technique. And it doesn't have to be hanon or czerny.  It can just be much easier pieces that allow you to get around fluently on the keyboard.
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candlelightpiano
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« Reply #9 on: February 07, 2012, 06:37:39 PM »

I know this is off topic but Birba, can you please watch my practice video on my thread for the last page of FI? I need your help with this page, especially bars 127 up RH. Thank you. Also sent you link via PM.
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birba
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« Reply #10 on: February 07, 2012, 08:19:17 PM »

I did and my video should be arriving soon.  This is so funny.  You tracked me down in another room!  Grin
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New Sheet Music: Liszt – Transcriptions of Songs by Schubert

Transcriptions and paraphrases played an important part in shaping Liszt’s role as leading musical figure of his generation. Seven transcriptions of songs by Franz Schubert has been added to the sheet music library. Read more >>

candlelightpiano
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« Reply #11 on: February 07, 2012, 08:27:49 PM »

Birba, it's a small, small world or you live in a small house!!!   Grin Grin  Thank YOU very much!
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luicha
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« Reply #12 on: February 09, 2012, 06:21:12 PM »

I started playing Piano last year, and my teacher gave us the Suzuki method sheets, and Hanon, the virtuoso pianist exercise.

I always rush and try to play difficult songs, but I get very tired at the middle of my "study" of that song, so now I'm choosing 2 songs, one easy song (I'm currently doing "Very easy and melodious studies" by Streabbog. And a difficult song I really like (I mean, is not that I choose to play a hard song, but a song I really like (which is unfournately difficult Tongue))

And before starting with the songs, I do the Hanon exercises 1 - 10 currently..
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