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Leaking Pianos in Spain, Denmark and Sweden…

These instrumental artworks by Nina Saunders are created for shopping malls.
Saunders is inspired by the environment she is in and adjusts the object to different locations to stimulate thoughts, humor and playfulness of the beholder. She came up with the idea for these artworks by looking at the landscape in a shopping mall and how people relate to it. Read more >>


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Author Topic: Piano Levels or Grades - is there a standard criteria ?  (Read 1046 times)
pianoplunker
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« on: February 15, 2012, 06:17:02 AM »

I see alot of posts on here that refer to Grades or Levels. Example: "That piece is certainly a level 7 work".  Or " I just finished Grade 1, now what do I do ?"    I remember learning Eckstein Piano level 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and there were other publishers that had their levels too.  Is there a standard that is referred to for what defines a piano level?  I understand that Level 10 is probably more involved than Level 1 but is this the type of thing where I can call it level 10 and you call it level 1 ? How is it determined ?  Speed ? Length ?  Flats or sharps ?     
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ajspiano
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« Reply #1 on: February 15, 2012, 07:47:56 AM »

It's based on both the musical difficulty and technical difficulty.

Tempo may sometimes be a factor, but really ther are slow pieces that are difficult and faster ones that are much easier.. Likewise there are horrendously difficult pieces in c major (no. Of sharps not a factor)

Think more like..  "how difficult is it to coordinate the hands, are they doing similar things or are they vastly different?" - "do you have to traverse large distances over the keys quickly or can your hands basically stay in the one place?" - "do you have to play multiple melodies or counter melodies and balance them dynamically?" - "complicated rhythms or is everything onthe beat?"
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cjp_piano
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« Reply #2 on: February 15, 2012, 03:24:29 PM »

There are many different systems that have graded repertoire: ABRSM, RCM, TAP and others. Look them up for more info =)
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Lang Lang “Live in Vienna” Released in Multiple Formats

Recorded and filmed live in Vienna’s legendary Musikverein concert hall, the Sony Classical debut is available on August 24 in multiple formats including vinyl and 3D video. This release represents Lang Lang’s second live recorded recital to date after the best-selling “Live at Carnegie Hall” in 2004, which marked his international breakthrough as a recording artist. He has performed the new album’s program at the world’s major concert venues and will continue to tour with it throughout 2011. Read more >>

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