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Author Topic: Performers ARCT program  (Read 3958 times)
thing2emma
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« on: June 29, 2012, 03:44:39 AM »

I finished my Grade 10 exam today (woohoo) and have no doubt that I passed.
So now I'm going on to ARCT...
I'm choosing pieces and so far adore Chopin Nocturne in C-, op. 48 no. 1, and Beethoven Sonata in C- (Pathetique) and also like Bach's Prelude and Fugue 1, BWV 846.
Problem is, all of those are in C or C-. Is this a problem? I know I'm supposed to have variety in my songs, but does that mean keys, or just styles?
Also, any suggestions for list D and E pieces and concert etudes that are very melodic (I dislike the dissonant ones) that would compliment these choices?
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Currently working on:
Bach Prelude and Fugue 13
Mozart Sonate in E flat Major, KV 282
Chopin Nocturne in E Minor Op 72, No. 1
Gershwin Rialto Ripples
Bolcom Graceful Ghost Rag
jugular
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« Reply #1 on: June 29, 2012, 12:24:21 PM »

I finished my Grade 10 exam today (woohoo) and have no doubt that I passed.
So now I'm going on to ARCT...
I'm choosing pieces and so far adore Chopin Nocturne in C-, op. 48 no. 1, and Beethoven Sonata in C- (Pathetique) and also like Bach's Prelude and Fugue 1, BWV 846.
Problem is, all of those are in C or C-. Is this a problem? I know I'm supposed to have variety in my songs, but does that mean keys, or just styles?
Also, any suggestions for list D and E pieces and concert etudes that are very melodic (I dislike the dissonant ones) that would compliment these choices?

I suggest dropping either the Nocturne in C minor or the Pathetique. I personally love the Pathetique sonata, but I know it's overplayed in ARCT exams making it 1) uninteresting for the adjudicators; 2) very easy for the adjuticators to critique as they've heard millions of interpretations by this point in their life. There's loads of classical sonatas you can substitue for it though, and if you want to stay in the category of Beethoven pieces you can learn his Sonata Op. 10, No. 3, in D Major. It's more technically challenging than the Pathetique, but nothing you can't handle at your level.

As for a list D, I'm currently learning the Estampes suite by Debussy and would highly suggest it as all three are beautiful compositions of music. Most people choose Debussy or Ravel pieces for list D, so search around those two composers mainly to see which pieces fit ARCT requirement (and that you enjoy them as well).

Congrats on passing grade 10, did you already do your pre-requisites for ARCT? That is, Advanced Harmony, Analysis, and History 3? Good luck and keep us updated.
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thing2emma
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« Reply #2 on: June 29, 2012, 12:31:29 PM »

Haha I know Pathetique is overplayed but I'm sticking with it. I adore it. Plus, I only have a year to complete my ARCT, since I'm going to university next year, so playing something that I already recognize will help me.
If I do stick with Pathetique and the Nocturne, should I chose a different Prelude and Fugue? Just because of the C minor, C major thing?
Thanks. Smiley I don't see those as pre-requisites, my syllabus says the pre-requisites are Harmony 4, and History 1-2. I'm part way through Harmony 4 and History 1, so I will be completing all of the pre-requisites in December.
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Currently working on:
Bach Prelude and Fugue 13
Mozart Sonate in E flat Major, KV 282
Chopin Nocturne in E Minor Op 72, No. 1
Gershwin Rialto Ripples
Bolcom Graceful Ghost Rag
jugular
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« Reply #3 on: June 29, 2012, 03:17:37 PM »

Haha I know Pathetique is overplayed but I'm sticking with it. I adore it. Plus, I only have a year to complete my ARCT, since I'm going to university next year, so playing something that I already recognize will help me.
If I do stick with Pathetique and the Nocturne, should I chose a different Prelude and Fugue? Just because of the C minor, C major thing?
Thanks. Smiley I don't see those as pre-requisites, my syllabus says the pre-requisites are Harmony 4, and History 1-2. I'm part way through Harmony 4 and History 1, so I will be completing all of the pre-requisites in December.

Haha you sound exactly like me Tongue I like the Pathetique more than the C minor nocturne as well. In that case though, I would definitely suggest doing another prelude and fugue as the C major key doesn't contrast that well with C minor immediately after. I suggest trying the B flat minor fugue, it's a 5 voice fugue but it's really not as bad as it may seem.

Hmm, I guess I've been misinformed about the pre-requisites. Only makes it better since I don't have to take analysis or history 3 Cheesy
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thing2emma
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« Reply #4 on: June 29, 2012, 03:21:58 PM »

I don't necessarily have to play it right after though. Like what if my performance order was Pathetique, List D, Prelude and Fugue in C, Concert etude, List E, Nocturne in C minor? As long as my List D, E, and concert etude were contrasting, would that be ok?
Haha yeah much better. Tongue My teacher wrongly informed that there were no theory pre-requisites, just co-requisites. As a result I didn't do any theory this year, planning to just do my practical exams and not bother with the certificates. (I'm not going into music in university or anything anyway.) Or at most, do theories as electives in university. But then I found out there are indeed pre-requisites. Yay for doing three theories in eight months or so on top of a full Grade 12 course load and a part time job. Tongue
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Currently working on:
Bach Prelude and Fugue 13
Mozart Sonate in E flat Major, KV 282
Chopin Nocturne in E Minor Op 72, No. 1
Gershwin Rialto Ripples
Bolcom Graceful Ghost Rag
jugular
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« Reply #5 on: June 29, 2012, 03:56:18 PM »

I don't necessarily have to play it right after though. Like what if my performance order was Pathetique, List D, Prelude and Fugue in C, Concert etude, List E, Nocturne in C minor? As long as my List D, E, and concert etude were contrasting, would that be ok?
Haha yeah much better. Tongue My teacher wrongly informed that there were no theory pre-requisites, just co-requisites. As a result I didn't do any theory this year, planning to just do my practical exams and not bother with the certificates. (I'm not going into music in university or anything anyway.) Or at most, do theories as electives in university. But then I found out there are indeed pre-requisites. Yay for doing three theories in eight months or so on top of a full Grade 12 course load and a part time job. Tongue

I'd personally just try to avoid having keys in the same key (even if they're different modes), but since you're set on doing the three pieces you mentioned you'd definitely need to spread them out, yes. I'd go with the P&F first, as it provides you with a good "warm up" for the rest of your performance. Follow this with your list D piece, the Nocturne, the list E piece, the Pathetique. I say save the pathetique for last so that you're fully warm by that point and can execute the runs with optimal clarity and precision (especially if they ask you for the 3rd mvmnt.)

The one thing you must pay attention to in theory is voice-leading, you get deducted MAJOR points on exams for voice-leading errors. So make sure you pay close attention to voice leading rules early on so that they're second nature to you. If you need any help you can always ask here as well!
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