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Piano Music to Cleanse the Soul – Pietro De Maria on Bach’s 48

At the Cremona Mondomusica Piano Experience in October, the Italian pianist Pietro De Maria performed selected preludes and fugues from Bach’s Well-Tempered Clavier (WTC), as part of the exhibition’s Decca/Deutsche Grammophon showcase series. After the concert, Piano Street’s David Wärn had the chance to talk to De Maria about the challenges pianists face when tackling Bach’s legendary “forty-eight”. Read more >>

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Author Topic: Chords, Arpeggios and Moonlight Sonata 3rd Mvmt  (Read 9410 times)
thiagoguedes
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« on: August 17, 2012, 06:26:12 PM »

Hi there,

I just started learning this piece.

I've already searched the forum, read a couple of posts of bernhard about it. What I'm planning:

- Group the ascending  arpeggios into chords and playing this way, like G# C# E G#. There will be seven chords in the first part;

- As soon as I can play the chords in tempo and accurately I'll start to slow them down into arpeggios again;

That's basically what I've read so far. I'm just worried in the linking part. How do I link these chords like moving the hand laterally in speed?

Anyway, any other advice is greatly appreciated.


Thank you,
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piano sheet music of Sonata 14 (Moonlight)
scherzo123
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« Reply #1 on: August 17, 2012, 09:47:12 PM »

Keep your hands very close to the keys while you play the chords.
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Bach Prelude and Fugue BWV848
Beethoven Piano Sonata Op.13
Chopin Etude Op.10 No.4
Chopin Scherzo Op.31
Mussorgsky "The Great Gate of Kiev" from Pictures at an Exhibition
rmbarbosa
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« Reply #2 on: August 20, 2012, 03:02:27 PM »

You may wish to read the "fundamentals of piano opractice", by C.C. Chang. Mr. Chang teaches precisely how to study the 3º mouvement og "moonlight". It`s not dificult.
Best wishes
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thiagoguedes
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« Reply #3 on: August 20, 2012, 04:55:56 PM »

Hi scherzo123 and rmbarbosa,

Thanks for answering.

I've read CChang's book and it was really helpful. I have two doubts, however.

When playing the fast arpeggios in the beginning, should I cycle the hand up, towards the fallboard, when going up (G# C# E G# and so) and then down or the other way?

Also, should I keep my fingers "stopped" and do the motion only with my arms or should the fingers also go down to press the keys?


Thank you,
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pytheamateur
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« Reply #4 on: August 20, 2012, 08:46:49 PM »

I'm learning this piece as well.  I have had trouble playing those broken chords as well.

One useful method to ensure that a steady tempo is maintained is by listening to the left hand staccato notes, which you can think of as percussion.  Some times I still play the left hand on its own and listening to them, to make sure that they do not speed up or get louder unless when indicated in the score.
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Beethoven - Sonata in C sharp minor, Op 27 No 12
Chopin - Fantasie Impromptu, Nocturn in C sharp minor, Op post
Brahms - Op 118, Nos 2 & 3
scherzo123
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« Reply #5 on: August 20, 2012, 09:34:50 PM »

When playing the arpeggios in chords, use your wrist more than your arm to press down. When you play them as regular arpeggios, keep the fingers that you use to hit the black keys "out". For example, if you play a G# with your thumb, don't go too "in". hit the black key where you can JUST reach it. Sorry if this gets confusing, it would be a breeze to explain it to you with a video.  Sad
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Bach Prelude and Fugue BWV848
Beethoven Piano Sonata Op.13
Chopin Etude Op.10 No.4
Chopin Scherzo Op.31
Mussorgsky "The Great Gate of Kiev" from Pictures at an Exhibition
thiagoguedes
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« Reply #6 on: August 21, 2012, 03:52:50 PM »

Hi scherzo123,

You were right, I couldn't get it. Hmm let me see..

When you say "fingers that you use to hit the black keys "out"", no too in". You mean no to in closer to the fallboard (kinda like gray area) or to in while pressing, in the keybed direction?

Thank you,
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scherzo123
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« Reply #7 on: August 21, 2012, 06:01:07 PM »

yes, in the direction going down to the keybed, and as far away from the fallboard as you can. hit the black keys where it is closest to the white keys.
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Bach Prelude and Fugue BWV848
Beethoven Piano Sonata Op.13
Chopin Etude Op.10 No.4
Chopin Scherzo Op.31
Mussorgsky "The Great Gate of Kiev" from Pictures at an Exhibition
thiagoguedes
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« Reply #8 on: August 21, 2012, 06:03:38 PM »

Hm, so it's really the gray area. Somewhere in between the blacks and whites.

Ok, so, I beg your pardon, but why is this helpful in the context of this pieace?


Thank you,
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scherzo123
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« Reply #9 on: August 21, 2012, 10:20:16 PM »

Hm, so it's really the gray area

Oh never mind...not the fall board... Undecided
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Bach Prelude and Fugue BWV848
Beethoven Piano Sonata Op.13
Chopin Etude Op.10 No.4
Chopin Scherzo Op.31
Mussorgsky "The Great Gate of Kiev" from Pictures at an Exhibition
danhuyle
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« Reply #10 on: August 22, 2012, 08:28:09 AM »

I'm being challenged on the right hand alberti bass in the development section. It's the coordination since I'm used to playing right hand melody and left hand alberti bass, not the other way around.

I find the coda and development the most challenging of this movement. The rest of it, it's not too bad. In fact, I'm thinking about making videos on how I learn this movement, since this sonata is so popular.

These are based on my experiences only.
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Perfection itself is imperfection.

Currently practicing
Albeniz Triana
Scriabin Fantaisie Op28
Scriabin All Etudes Op8
thiagoguedes
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« Reply #11 on: August 24, 2012, 12:45:47 AM »

Oh never mind...not the fall board... Undecided

Hi scherzo123,

I have recorded a video of what I am trying to do.

http://youtu.be/Pql961h6rhg

To tell you the truth, I have also been thinking about:

- After playing a chord, when I raise my hand, I think is easier for me to let the hand come a little bit back to the neutral position before striking the next one. Is it bad? I do think I lose some time to do this, but that`s the only I don't feel pain in my hand.

When breaking the chords into arpeggios, kida slowing them down, should I freeze my fingers and play only with a elliptical movement (second part of the video) or should there be finger movement to?
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scherzo123
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« Reply #12 on: August 24, 2012, 01:50:39 AM »

As long as you keep your hands and wrists loose, you'll be fine Wink. When you play those chords, make sure you don't push down on the keys. You should just drop your hand down when you hit those chords naturally and loosely, like dribbling a basketball. Also...your second finger of your right hand needs to curve a little more. Hope it goes well!  Grin
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Bach Prelude and Fugue BWV848
Beethoven Piano Sonata Op.13
Chopin Etude Op.10 No.4
Chopin Scherzo Op.31
Mussorgsky "The Great Gate of Kiev" from Pictures at an Exhibition
thiagoguedes
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« Reply #13 on: August 24, 2012, 11:42:41 AM »

Hi scherzo123,

Thank you very much for your input. I'll be sure to keep those in mind when practicing Wink

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