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Master Teacher Hans Leygraf’s Fundamental Lessons

A much longed-for documentation of the pianist and piano pedagogue Hans Leygraf’s methodology is now to be found on two DVDs. These recordings, made among a selected few of his students in Salzburg, extends from the appropriate way of touching the keys to interpretation of the music as illustrated by practising compositions of Bach, Chopin and Schubert. Read more >>

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Author Topic: So when will I be able to learn movie pieces on my own?  (Read 425 times)
ranniks
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« on: January 31, 2013, 10:29:14 PM »

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MU7WCI0d6A8" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MU7WCI0d6A8</a>

When? I want to learn classical and regular piano with my own teacher, but pieces like above I would love to be able to learn on my own. But how do I go about it? When will I have the skillset necessary to learn these pieces easily? Let''s say learn them in a span of a month or 2 months?

I'm a decent fast learner if I put my mind to it, so I'm open to suggestions.

Or is it just like I suspect something that comes in a few years?
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ruvidoetostinato
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« Reply #1 on: January 31, 2013, 10:55:41 PM »

Classical and regular piano O.o.

Well it all depends on the music you're talking about.  These piano transcriptions come in so many forms and difficulties. 

Do you mean creating your own arrangements?

Personally, I think you should start do what you love while incorporating new elements that you learn to the music you want to play.
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"Practice makes not so imperfect."
Rachmaninoff: Trio Elegiaque #2
Ginastera: Cello Sonata
Anderson & Roe: Carmen Fantasy
Schumann: Kreisleriana
Scriabin: Sonata #2
Liszt: Totentanz
hfmadopter
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« Reply #2 on: February 01, 2013, 10:34:13 AM »

[]

When? I want to learn classical and regular piano with my own teacher, but pieces like above I would love to be able to learn on my own. But how do I go about it? When will I have the skillset necessary to learn these pieces easily? Let''s say learn them in a span of a month or 2 months?

I'm a decent fast learner if I put my mind to it, so I'm open to suggestions.

Or is it just like I suspect something that comes in a few years?

You can start today, just download some of the easy piano versions to start with. That's what I did 30 years ago ( well couldn't download then, had to go buy them). Learn the notes, look at the chord structure and add some fill. Doable in two months with ease. You will be surprised how nice even easy piano pieces sound as written, a lot has to do with your own ability to express music ( that inner sense has to come out). As you progress in music you will feel the need to add more of your own fill and spread out over the keyboard.

You need a good foundation in 4ths, 5ths 6ths, 7ths and related minor chords. And you can build from there.
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The New Concept: Scores for All Stages of Learning

On the recent Music Education Expo in London, Piano Street presented a new concept for sheet music publication. Depending on your own level of experience and where you are in the learning process of a particular piece, you may need fingering, pedal markings, practice and performance tips, or perhaps the right opposite - a clean Urtext score. Read more >>

ranniks
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« Reply #3 on: February 01, 2013, 04:36:49 PM »

Classical and regular piano O.o.

Well it all depends on the music you're talking about.  These piano transcriptions come in so many forms and difficulties. 

Do you mean creating your own arrangements?

Personally, I think you should start do what you love while incorporating new elements that you learn to the music you want to play.

Classical being mozar and such, regular being pop and such (I phrased that wrongly, lol).

No I mean playing them from a sheet and memorising them.

You can start today, just download some of the easy piano versions to start with. That's what I did 30 years ago ( well couldn't download then, had to go buy them). Learn the notes, look at the chord structure and add some fill. Doable in two months with ease. You will be surprised how nice even easy piano pieces sound as written, a lot has to do with your own ability to express music ( that inner sense has to come out). As you progress in music you will feel the need to add more of your own fill and spread out over the keyboard.

You need a good foundation in 4ths, 5ths 6ths, 7ths and related minor chords. And you can build from there.

Really? Thanks David. I want to finish what I've started, so will try to do the harry potter one.
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hfmadopter
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« Reply #4 on: February 01, 2013, 09:13:40 PM »

[quote ]

Really? Thanks David. I want to finish what I've started, so will try to do the harry potter one.
[/quote]

I'm not familiar with anything Harry Potter, somehow even with all my grand kids that we have I've managed to avoid that series of events !

What ever you try at this stage, it's good to get the Easy Piano versions and Piano with Guitar versions are good as well because they will give you Guitar chords that you can follow and create from. Arpeggiated chords built from the Guitar symbols work great. You can grow a piece greatly that way actually. Just keep it all in rhythm. Your teacher is into jazz as I recall ? He should be able to help you.
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