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Belated London Premiere for Fanny Mendelssohn Hensel on International Women’s Day

As part of its special day of programming for International Women’s Day, BBC Radio 3 broadcasted a live performance of the Easter Sonata, a major piano work which until recently had been attributed to Felix Mendelssohn, but is now proved to be the work of his sister Fanny Mendelssohn Hensel. Read more >>

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Author Topic: Frederic Chopin - Nocturne Op.9 No.2  (Read 5322 times)
minerdigger
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« on: April 04, 2013, 09:56:11 AM »

Hi! This is my first time posting on this forum, just want to share my performance of Chopin's Nocturne in Eb Major. This piece is the one that made me want to learn to play piano (Well not really 'learning' because I've got no teacher, more like 'learning' it through Synthesia). I played this piece in a neat little cheap Yamaha keyboard with 61 keys (which is technically unfit to play this piece  Grin)



Playing piano is just one of the best ways to relax when Accounting or Financial Management or any other subjects bother me. With that said, I would appreciate criticisms and comments, I am sorry if I made lots of mistakes!

Whilst we're at it, why not visit my youtube page http://www.youtube.com/user/minerdigger?feature=mhee which fills with badly written pieces.  Grin

Cheers.
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piano sheet music of Nocturne
bronnestam
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« Reply #1 on: April 09, 2013, 09:44:14 AM »

I think you have a clear and personal idea of the melody here. It sounds beautiful and it is fully enjoyable.

Now the flaws, mwahaha.  Tongue  (I guess you want that too.)
It could be that most of them can be blamed on the piano.

While the right hand is expressive and soft, I get a slight uncomfortable feeling that the left hand is rather much marching alone. It sound a bit too monotonuos in the bass, in my opinion. I would like to feel that both "voices" are on the same train, if you understand what I mean.
It is a bit TOO shy here and there, and sometimes unnecessarily hesitant when the major theme (the "chorus") is introduced again. I think you could play with a more confident attack without losing the softness. Try a more powerful version just to experiment with the styles.

... and remember, I am by no means an expert, I am just a happy amateur who play for leisure, so take my reflections for what they are ...

Thanks for uploading!  Smiley
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jj5594
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« Reply #2 on: April 17, 2013, 10:41:53 PM »

I completly agree with the previous post. Well done especially on terrible keyboard :p As bronnestam mentioned it does seem there is a lag between both hands, this piece can be tricky in the left hand as it does moves up and down octaves throughout the piece and therefore you did do a reasonable job  Smiley Try working on joint scales, even simple ones (c sclde) with both hands. The more you do it the more both hands will be played at the same time  Wink Apart from that technically, it was great. Now with the piece itself. Chopin is widely regarded as the most romantic piano composers. His pieces are like songs for the piano, made to be sung with the piano as a voice. Therefore (especially in his nocturnes) the voice is the right hand and the left hand is the bass, the rhythm. There are two points I would like to make: Firstly try to play the right hand louder than the left. (This is hard to do but by practicing it is achievable, try with scales for examples, right hand louder then left hand louder to practice both) I do understand this is not really possible with a keyboard though :/ Secondly, try to play this piece as if you are singing it, You are playing it to the beat, it should be played as you think it should be played and not sound robotic. Regardless of this very well played, keep up the practice and you will easily ace this piece and others. (Try his nocturne in c sharp minor easier (maybe go slow at end) and try to grasp the idea of a louder right hand and softer left hand) Hope I have helped!!  Grin
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ikako
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« Reply #3 on: December 15, 2014, 06:37:00 AM »

Where lovely and sincere performance. Very good.
Try that your left hand sounds like a guitar, Chopin insisted on this.
Make your right hand freer sometimes, meaning that you can use some rubatos here and there.
I do not agree with other poster on playing louder. As Chopin one exclaimed, the bad news are equally devastating being murmured or shouted out loud.
The thing you have to do is create more contrasts. That can be done with the usage of pedal and rubato.
Remove your damper pedals in the middle of the phrase - your notes will come out ringing.

Above all, try to sing with the music and play freely.
Good hint - play in dark! Thus your ears will have to do all the work.
Wish you luck!
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