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The New Concept: Scores for All Stages of Learning

On the recent Music Education Expo in London, Piano Street presented a new concept for sheet music publication. Depending on your own level of experience and where you are in the learning process of a particular piece, you may need fingering, pedal markings, practice and performance tips, or perhaps the right opposite - a clean Urtext score. Read more >>

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Author Topic: Notturno-Grieg  (Read 2577 times)
ivoryplayer4him
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« on: October 29, 2004, 10:03:53 PM »

I am wondering if anyone can give me any helpful hints on this piece.  I am playing it for a recital coming up and i t would really be great if i could get somehints.  ANY KIND WOULD DO. 
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Romance- a short, simple melody, vocal or instrumental, of tender character

piano sheet music of Nocturne
bernhard
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« Reply #1 on: October 29, 2004, 10:31:06 PM »

First let me get my sun glasses. Grin Cool

What seems to be the problem?

Best wishes,
Bernhard.
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The music business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs. There's also a negative side. (Hunter Thompson)
allchopin
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« Reply #2 on: October 30, 2004, 03:59:27 AM »

Op. 54 #4?
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A modern house without a flush toilet... uncanny.


The New Concept: Scores for All Stages of Learning

On the recent Music Education Expo in London, Piano Street presented a new concept for sheet music publication. Depending on your own level of experience and where you are in the learning process of a particular piece, you may need fingering, pedal markings, practice and performance tips, or perhaps the right opposite - a clean Urtext score. Read more >>

ivoryplayer4him
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« Reply #3 on: October 30, 2004, 06:14:25 PM »

First let me get my sun glasses. Grin Cool

What seems to be the problem?

Best wishes,
Bernhard.


lol Sorry, I just found out how to do all that stuff so i'm experimenting with it.  Anyway, Heres the deal.  I've played the piano for 11 years now.  but the majority of that time was spent playing the piano for churches.  I'm a good pianist (not being conceded, i just mean people love my style and passion behind it) but i've never really had any classical training.  This will be my 2nd classical piece to really play.  the first one being Moonlight Sonata ( i taught myself that one).  I just want some helpful hints like things that could make this piece sound bad things that could make it sound great just anything like that.  Its not that hard of a piece but going from hymns to classical is a big transition for me so any kindof mentoring would help
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Romance- a short, simple melody, vocal or instrumental, of tender character
bernhard
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« Reply #4 on: October 30, 2004, 07:47:15 PM »

What stage are you at? Mastered all the notes and need some interpretation suggestions? Or still struggling with the movements/fingerings/etc. and need some practice tips (and if so which sections)?

The more specific your questions, the more useful the answers, and the more chance people will be inclined to share their opinions. As it is your question is too vague. One could write a 300 page volume on it!

So here is some introductory material.

1.   Listen to CDs of this piece. My personal favourites are Leif Oves Andnes and Emil Gilels (DG). But I also like Einar Steen Nokleberg (Naxos) and often listen to his renditions since he is regarded as a Grieg specialist, (and an University professor  with a book on Grieg’s interpretation).

2.   Grieg – like Beethoven – was deeply drawn to nature and in fact in 1884 he bought land in rural Norway where he built a house where he was to live for the rest of his life. So his Nocturne is very different from Chopin’s who was much more of an urban guy. While Chopin’s nocturnes are sophisticated and multi-layered, Grieg’s is much more rustic and elemental an “evocation of the spirit of the night”. So think of a rural landscape, with the murmur of brooks and bird calls. Also remember that Norway has very very long nights. (Grieg’s house was actually on a Fjord). So read about Grieg’s biography, his personality and the Norwegian landscape which he deeply loved (get a picture book!).
 
3.   The main difficulties of this piece are in the cross rhythms and on bringing up the melody while keeping the third figurations in the background. Grieg’s original pedal indications may seem excessive, but he was after creating a “shimmering” effect, a haze of sound. This piece is very effective at slow speeds (dotted crochet = 54- 58) but it will be easier to hold it together at a slightly faster speed. Break it down into the melodic line and the accompaniment (played by both the right and left hand) and learn these separately so that you have a very clear idea of the long melodic lines.

I hope this helps.

Best wishes,
Bernhard.
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The music business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs. There's also a negative side. (Hunter Thompson)
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