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Author Topic: Beethoven - Opus 27, Number 2, C# Minor  (Read 1403 times)
MichaelT
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« on: November 19, 2001, 06:21:22 AM »

The 3rd movement of the Moonlight Sonata.  I was wondering how to go about practicing the 'octave trills' in measures 32 and 128.  These are pretty difficult to execute.  I have had suggestions to just play the top note, instead of the octave, which I am doing at the moment, but I want to be able to do it correctly as well.

Thanks for any advice!
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piano sheet music of Sonata 14 (Moonlight)
robert_henry
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« Reply #1 on: November 19, 2001, 09:11:00 AM »

Before I give my suggestion, I wanna be sure you understand that only the top voice has to be trilled.  THe thumb only plays a single note.  This may be obvious to you, but just making sure.


MENTAL STUFF
1. Don't make the mistake of playing every note in that line with a sF.  At MM 29 - 30 you can see that only the B#, C#, and the B have sF, not the downbeat.  Why is this important?  Because right from the start, we've given ourselves permission to play the trill at a dynamic other than FF.  

2. Try thinking of MM 29-30 like this: Measure 29 make it a 5/4 bar, measure 30 make it a 3/4 bar.  This will help you follow through with my first suggestion, which was to accent only the notes that Beethoven says to accent.  He was no dummy.  


PHYSICAL STUFF
3.  To practice the trill, (let's just take the A# at measure 30), you must first realize that your thumb doesn't need to hold down it's note.  Just play it, and quickly release it because you will catch it in the pedal.  Pretend that it's a "hot" key, and that you will burn yourslef if you hold it.

4.  And lastly, how will you move your arm and wrist?  I'll tell you.  Have you ever used a manual pencil sharpener?  Imagine yourslef standing in front of one, turning the handle on the side.  See how your arm moves in a sort of circle, especially from your elbow?  Now do it slowly, only twice.  That's the motion you need for the A# trill and the B at measure 30.  One arm circle for each note.  You need the "small" notes of the trill to "ride" on the wave you are creating with your arm.  

It's not Bach, so for now be less concerned with articulation of each and every note, and be more concerned with creating the right effect.  Also, it's perfectly OK to give a little more time to the A# (trill), but just make sure there is a difference in dynamic.

Hope this helps.

Robert Henry
http://www.roberthenry.org



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MichaelT
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« Reply #2 on: November 20, 2001, 01:16:48 AM »

Great advice!  I understand that the thumb only plays a single note... (would be kinda diffcult if trilled as well  Tongue)

I don't have access to a piano at the moment, but I have printed out your advice, and will go over it with my teacher tomorrow.  

Thanks for the reply!

-Michael
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crashtest
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« Reply #3 on: December 30, 2001, 03:42:18 AM »

In that same movement,  before that trill enters, and also before that second area starts (with the left hand tremolos), there is an appogiatura that has to be played. Is this played before the beat (It is hard to fit it and keep the 16th note tremolos going evenly) or can I play this particular appogiatura along with some of the notes of the left hand tremolo and which?
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Cecin_Koot
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« Reply #4 on: November 26, 2004, 10:35:43 AM »

that sounds hard
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yamaha
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« Reply #5 on: November 26, 2004, 05:57:07 PM »

I LOVE the 3rd movement o the Moonlight.  I was going to do it for my DipABRSM but am doing the Pathetique instead.  I did try it for a while (months actually  Embarrassed ) but found it too hard.  I hope to take it up again after my exam. 

Good Luck with it  Smiley
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bernhard
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« Reply #6 on: November 27, 2004, 06:04:59 PM »

Before I give my suggestion, I wanna be sure you understand that only the top voice has to be trilled.  THe thumb only plays a single note.  This may be obvious to you, but just making sure.


MENTAL STUFF
1. Don't make the mistake of playing every note in that line with a sF.  At MM 29 - 30 you can see that only the B#, C#, and the B have sF, not the downbeat.  Why is this important?  Because right from the start, we've given ourselves permission to play the trill at a dynamic other than FF.  

2. Try thinking of MM 29-30 like this: Measure 29 make it a 5/4 bar, measure 30 make it a 3/4 bar.  This will help you follow through with my first suggestion, which was to accent only the notes that Beethoven says to accent.  He was no dummy.  


PHYSICAL STUFF
3.  To practice the trill, (let's just take the A# at measure 30), you must first realize that your thumb doesn't need to hold down it's note.  Just play it, and quickly release it because you will catch it in the pedal.  Pretend that it's a "hot" key, and that you will burn yourslef if you hold it.

4.  And lastly, how will you move your arm and wrist?  I'll tell you.  Have you ever used a manual pencil sharpener?  Imagine yourslef standing in front of one, turning the handle on the side.  See how your arm moves in a sort of circle, especially from your elbow?  Now do it slowly, only twice.  That's the motion you need for the A# trill and the B at measure 30.  One arm circle for each note.  You need the "small" notes of the trill to "ride" on the wave you are creating with your arm.  

It's not Bach, so for now be less concerned with articulation of each and every note, and be more concerned with creating the right effect.  Also, it's perfectly OK to give a little more time to the A# (trill), but just make sure there is a difference in dynamic.

Hope this helps.

Robert Henry
http://www.roberthenry.org






WOW!

Keep posting, Robert Henry, will you? Please?

Best wishes,
Bernhard (in spellbound admiration Shocked Wink).
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