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Prokofiev: Sarcasms and Visions Fugitives

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Author Topic: Some tips on how to analyse XVIII century music, particularly applied to Haydn.  (Read 213 times)
wkmt
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« on: September 29, 2017, 04:42:35 PM »

I'm writing a summary of the main elements related to the analysis of XVIII century music, specifically Haydn.

I'm looking forward to starting a discussion about which elements we should consider building blocks, which perspective we should apply etc.

My first article can be found at
http://www.piano-composer-teacher-london.co.uk/single-post/2017/09/26/How-to-analyse-Haydn-Piano-Sonatas
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j_tour
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« Reply #1 on: September 29, 2017, 09:36:29 PM »

Sounds good.

So, what's the summary, in your opinion?
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wkmt
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« Reply #2 on: September 30, 2017, 08:59:49 AM »

Sounds good.

So, what's the summary, in your opinion?

Well, we have started with enunciating which are the most popular phrase types, we will continue developing these list and then we will go into forms.
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keypeg
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« Reply #3 on: September 30, 2017, 12:29:24 PM »

Well, we have started with enunciating which are the most popular phrase types, we will continue developing these list and then we will go into forms.
That does not give a summary.  It gives detail in an immense void. (so far)

It would be good to have some context to what you are doing.  What type of background do the students have to whom you are teaching this?  Do they already have a grasp of basic rudiments and theory?  Are you teaching them these details after they have learned some basics about musical form?  Are you concentrating on Haydn as a specialization after introducing the sonata as a form generally?  The word "sonata" itself is problematic, since a sonata itself consists of several movements, and each movement can have (usually has) a different form.  One form is the "sonata allegro" form --- do you mean "sonata allegro" when you refer to "sonata"? (That is often done).  Sonata allegro can be summarized in a short paragraph.

I have learned in both directions.   One is to sketch out the broad form and concepts first, do exercises and find examples, and look for details within this.  The other is to start with details, and expand to find patterns that will allow us to find the broad form.  Are you doing the latter?
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hardy_practice
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« Reply #4 on: September 30, 2017, 02:12:02 PM »

The usual ill educated, illiterate crap.  I suggest you read this: https://www.pianostreet.com/smf/index.php?topic=64258.0
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B Mus, PGCE, DipABRSM
keypeg
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« Reply #5 on: September 30, 2017, 03:06:30 PM »

I think most of us are already aware that this is by way of advertisement, i.e. "achieving visibility".
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j_tour
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« Reply #6 on: October 01, 2017, 02:25:24 AM »

I think most of us are already aware that this is by way of advertisement, i.e. "achieving visibility".

Well, I had a half-ridiculous idea of opening a thread with a discussion about some functional harmony in Haydn, or something, but, yeah, no.

Well, here's my profound discovery I made today about music theory:  the chords and sequence (yes, all three chords in the right place) to "Happy Birthday" are the same as the old radio tune "Stone Cold Dead in the Market."

I'm sure everyone realized that but me, but it makes it more fun for me to go to a party and know I can just have an alternate tune in my mind while playing the tune.

Deep, man.
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