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Do We Judge Music by Sight More Than Sound?

With an increased share of classical music consumed in various audivisual formats in relation to audio only, a relevant question to ask is whether it disturbs or enhances the musical experience of a classical composition. We have selected four distinctly different types of videos with respectable performances of the same work, Liszt’s Sonata in B minor. Listen and watch a few minutes of each and then cast your vote! Read more >>

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Author Topic: So, is it too late for me to become a mediocre concert pianist?  (Read 1680 times)
torandrekongelf
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« on: November 17, 2017, 12:15:59 AM »

Hi there.

So I played the piano since I was 10 years old. Stopped from 18 to 32 because I was living a familiy life with no piano but listened and studied music on my own. I started again at 32 as I moved out on my own and been quite obsessed since then.

I have a dream of playing all keyboard music (perhaps organ too) of Bach, and recently discovered Mozart for real and want to play all his solo keyboard music as well.

The hardest piece I played so far is Beethovens Moonlights sonata. The entire sonata. At a very good level. I can post a video of it for the only reason that you get some idea of my level.



I can sight right Bachs inventions at half speed. And I just sight-read at very slow speed without much hesitation couple of English Suites.

I just love Bach at the moment and want to know everything about him and his music so I am obsessed about learning all his keyboard music.

I have asperger syndrome so I fail at friendships but I really like practicing and I practice from 2 hours to entire days at the most. I never had a proper teacher either but I am recently come in contact with a piano professor who will teach me. 100 dollars for 1 hour though.

I think that if I focus very hard and practice effieciently for 10 years Ive built enough skill to perform concerts locally for free in churces etc.

Seems realistic?

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mjames
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« Reply #1 on: November 17, 2017, 12:50:10 AM »

I think you're good enough to perform in local and church concerts. lol
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Composing/improvising

Chopin's 4th ballade and 3rd sonata.
Scriabin Op. 42 no. 1, 2, and 3.
Bach Partita No.4
dogperson
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« Reply #2 on: November 17, 2017, 01:32:09 AM »

 From looking at your videos and reading your prior postS,  I don't believe you need to wait 10 years to play in churches.   You can do it now. I would suggest that you look at traditional services, particularly in the Catholic and Episcopalian faiths, as your emphasis on Bach would be appreciated there.

Best wishes!
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torandrekongelf
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« Reply #3 on: November 17, 2017, 12:17:53 PM »

Thanks.

As for learning all of Bachs keyboards music. You think that is doable as well?
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timothy42b
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« Reply #4 on: November 17, 2017, 03:49:03 PM »

I never had a proper teacher either but I am recently come in contact with a piano professor who will teach me. 100 dollars for 1 hour though.

I think that if I focus very hard and practice effieciently for 10 years Ive built enough skill to perform concerts locally for free in churces etc.

Seems realistic?



$100 an hour is not unusual for a top teacher and might save you 8 of those 10 years, if he's really good.  I've paid that much (though not for weekly lessons) and they've been worth it in the amount of confusion they removed. 

You can probably get paid for accompanying in church now or very soon.  You can certainly play hymns and lead sheets. 

Don't do it for free though.  When you do that you depress the market for musicians who need the pay to survive. 
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Tim
torandrekongelf
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« Reply #5 on: November 17, 2017, 03:52:22 PM »

$100 an hour is not unusual for a top teacher and might save you 8 of those 10 years, if he's really good.  I've paid that much (though not for weekly lessons) and they've been worth it in the amount of confusion they removed. 

You can probably get paid for accompanying in church now or very soon.  You can certainly play hymns and lead sheets. 

Don't do it for free though.  When you do that you depress the market for musicians who need the pay to survive. 

Thanks I agree. I would gladly use that amount of money to for a teacher, if I could afford it. But maybe once a months is a lot better than not at all.

Thanks for reply
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hardy_practice
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« Reply #6 on: November 17, 2017, 05:22:31 PM »

Finally a sensible question!  Yes, of course.  I pay Ł45 for my violin lessons - today I left laughing my head off with joy, so money well spent.  20 years ago I was paying my piano teacher the same amount and with the same result. 
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B Mus, PGCE, DipABRSM
tnan123
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« Reply #7 on: November 17, 2017, 05:26:25 PM »

Yes I think its possible to become a concert pianist! If you have the motivation and the passion for it I don't see why you wouldn't be able to find some performing opportunities! To be a touring concert pianist may require some more work to get your name out there but who knows if you might get some lucky breaks. It will definitely take a lot of time and dedication though. I definitely think starting with a good teacher is a tremendous step.

As to your question about learning ALL of Bach's keyboard works. That might be really hard. He wrote so much! In addition to all the solo keyboard works BWV 772-994 (for clavichord or harpsichord) there are also all the organ works BWV 525-771 which require you to have an organ to play as intended. Do you have access to an organ with multiple manuals (including a pedal keyboard)?
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torandrekongelf
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« Reply #8 on: November 17, 2017, 08:08:29 PM »

Yes I think its possible to become a concert pianist! If you have the motivation and the passion for it I don't see why you wouldn't be able to find some performing opportunities! To be a touring concert pianist may require some more work to get your name out there but who knows if you might get some lucky breaks. It will definitely take a lot of time and dedication though. I definitely think starting with a good teacher is a tremendous step.

As to your question about learning ALL of Bach's keyboard works. That might be really hard. He wrote so much! In addition to all the solo keyboard works BWV 772-994 (for clavichord or harpsichord) there are also all the organ works BWV 525-771 which require you to have an organ to play as intended. Do you have access to an organ with multiple manuals (including a pedal keyboard)?

I am only talking about the 772-994 ones Smiley
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