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Author Topic: Tuning Software  (Read 21441 times)
stevenpn
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« on: February 06, 2012, 10:41:50 AM »

Hello folks,

Can anyone recommend shareware piano tuning software (that is, free)?  I haven't had much luck with the free Tunelab 97, although Tunelab Pro works beautifully (I've used the trial for some time, but can't quite afford the full version). 

Thank you very much,

Steven
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tannertuner
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« Reply #1 on: February 15, 2012, 11:52:52 PM »

When have you ever gotten anything for free that was worth having? Piano tuning is a highly developed skill and "electronic" piano tuning aids are very complicated programs. Why should it be free?
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quantum
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« Reply #2 on: February 17, 2012, 07:21:08 AM »

If by free you refer to the absence of monetary prerequisite, there is a whole selection of open source programs that meet or exceed the functionality of comparable commercial, or commercially produced product. 

A few that come to mind:
Audacity
Ardour
jOrgan
OpenOffice.org
Gimp
VLC
Firefox

A lot more here:
http://www.osalt.com


I believe it is only a matter of time before an open source developer takes on the project of piano tuning software.


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gvfarns
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« Reply #3 on: February 18, 2012, 09:32:28 PM »

When have you ever gotten anything for free that was worth having? Piano tuning is a highly developed skill and "electronic" piano tuning aids are very complicated programs. Why should it be free?

Very silly post, one of a trend that I've seen from you, tannertuner.  Tons of great things that are worth having a free, especially in the software world.  Every piece of software I use both at home and at my work is completely free, including the operating system.  Are you living under a rock or something that you would think there's no valuable free software?  Piano tuning aids are nowhere near as complicated as many very nice free programs and apps.

Really, I wonder if you just get a rise out of people's response to your outrageous comments.

Unfortunately, as a rule free software is usually stuff that either appeals to the computer geeks who write them or has a large potential user base, so tuning acoustic pianos doesn't seem a likely candidate to me.  I could be wrong, but unfortunately I'm not particularly hopeful that you will find something adequate.  Let us know if you do, though.
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johnlewisgrant
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« Reply #4 on: February 19, 2012, 11:17:52 PM »

Re Tunelab pro and 97.... essentially the same program!   So if pro works for you (with timeouts) so should 97!!!   In fact, you can run them simultaneously, just to double check the accuracy of your IH measurements.

TL is as good as you will get in free tuning programs; in fact, ALL of them (save Verituner) work pretty much the way TL does: they produce a smooth tuning curve based on the individual IH measurements of your instrument.  (May be Cybertuner is different, can't say for sure.)

The limitations of this approach are that while your temperament octave (A3-A4) will probably sound OK placed on an idealized curve, the entire piano tuned that way will sound less, sometimes far less, than "reverberent" for want of a better term. 

Verituner is the only program that I'm aware of that actually calculates precise (non-linear, non-idealized, non-smooth) tuning curves.  Thus, every note's ideal tuning is calculated on the basis of its relation to every other note on the piano, and you get a typical tuning curve: jagged ups and downs off the smooth, idealized curve, which is what you get with a pro-tuner.

If you intend to spend years and years at the piano, and would probably spend over 600 bucks (or thereabouts) on pro tuning, Verituner is worth it.  Once you get the hang of tuning, it is not hard to keep your piano in perfect tune ALL the time. 

Contary to what I've heard SOME (not all) tuners say, learning to bring each string of the piano into tune is not all that difficult.  The MOST important point (well, 2 points) is 1. do NOT flagpole the tuning pin, thereby wrecking either slowly or quickly the piano's pinblock; 2. do NOT tighten to reach the target pitch; rather ease into it from above the target pitch.  Also, please use a top-notch tuning wrench.   For uprights I think it is settled opinion now that hammer levers prevent flagpolling.

On Verituner: quite frankly, the program is OLD software, but it can work MIRACULOUSLY, better in my view than all but the most accomplished tuners.   It takes finessing to use it, but once you get used to massaging it, the results (in my view) are superior to anything you are likely to get from an old-fashioned tuner.   Unisons, which are pretty easy to realize on TL are super-precise on VT.  Also, you get an end-result that "sings", or "resonates", for want of a better term.   The piano  (my experience) becomes a different instrument, literally.

But, IH measurements, and careful mic placement are very important.  Once you've used it for a couple of years.   Also, as you've probably figured out, C8, B7, and A#7 (ie the top three notes) are HARD to tune on ALL programs.  TL (not 97) may do a slightly better job than some!!

Surprising that no high-end shareware or open source piano tuner has hit the market yet.   It could be that Dave Carpenter of VT has hit the nail head with his program and that there is absolutely no way to duplicate it without copyright infringement.   

OH.... here's my Hailun 218 tuned by me with VT (Verituner)

http://www.box.com/s/cilx8e6kug0zx4p23pkx



JG
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keys60
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« Reply #5 on: February 21, 2012, 11:48:46 PM »

I've also heard from many tuners that use the Verituner device or software that it arguably the best. The Sanderson is also a good ETD, but I think it loses something in the upper registers. I've used on a few times to save time, but I like aural tuning better. It was good for a temperament, but I let my ears take over after that. After a while, I just good better and see no need for it. I would still like to try a VT though out of curiosity.
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Bob
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« Reply #6 on: February 22, 2012, 12:08:36 AM »

Do any of those programs leave a "trail" of what the pitch was?  I've always thought that would be very useful, to have a line drawn like like Richter scale graph so you or a student could see where the pitch is and is going.
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lostprin36
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« Reply #7 on: February 25, 2012, 05:52:24 PM »

Tuning software just make effect on the music tune. Many are using this & become a good piano player but I think its not the proper way, is it?
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floydgaddpianos
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« Reply #8 on: March 11, 2012, 04:53:15 AM »

What has been your frustration with Tunelab 97?  Are you familiar with the tutorial by Jim Coleman Sr. on the mail.ptg.org site?  A very useful posting can be found at http://mail.ptg.org/pipermail/pianotech/1999-November/054596.html

Floyd Gadd
Brandon, MB
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keys60
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« Reply #9 on: March 15, 2012, 09:57:36 PM »

Jim Coleman is practically what legends are made from. I enjoy his media and dedication to the craft.
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filiptb
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« Reply #10 on: March 10, 2013, 07:46:11 PM »

Because I could not find any good free piano tuning software I made an open source tuning program myself. It already does stretch tuning (though not as sophisticated as some of the commercial stuff out there). You're welcome to try it, you can get it here: https://sourceforge.net/projects/ultratune/

I'd love to get some feedback, too.
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quantum
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« Reply #11 on: March 12, 2013, 09:19:17 PM »

Because I could not find any good free piano tuning software I made an open source tuning program myself. It already does stretch tuning (though not as sophisticated as some of the commercial stuff out there). You're welcome to try it, you can get it here: https://sourceforge.net/projects/ultratune/

I'd love to get some feedback, too.

Thank you for making it open source!
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Made a Liszt. Need new Handel's for Soler panel & Alkan foil. Will Faure Stein on the way to pick up Mendels' sohn. Josquin get Wolfgangs Schu with Clara. Gone Chopin, I'll be Bach
koopakool
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« Reply #12 on: March 12, 2013, 10:16:58 PM »

should get one of these  Grin
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ugAxXm2SAXw" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ugAxXm2SAXw</a>
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Bob
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« Reply #13 on: March 16, 2013, 06:21:20 PM »

Isn't that piano going to go back out of tune when it's turned off?  And then retune, back out of tune, over and over... Wouldn't it wear it out faster?
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shlomo
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« Reply #14 on: March 20, 2013, 03:57:45 PM »

Thank you for making it open source!

How about Mac?
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iansinclair
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« Reply #15 on: March 21, 2013, 12:09:21 AM »

How about Mac?
Last I knew -- which was some time ago -- Apple was, to put it mildly, very unfriendly towards open software and developers not specifically blessed by the company.
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Ian
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« Reply #16 on: May 02, 2013, 11:29:52 AM »

We use insTuner https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/instuner-chromatic-tuner/id528923171?mt=8 and it produces comparable results to Jahn TLA CTS-7-P.
 

Piano Tuning when in Hungary: http://www.pianostudio.hu/ Smiley visit us!
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funpiano
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« Reply #17 on: January 14, 2014, 03:21:30 PM »

This "IC Piano Tuner" comes with a nominal price of $4.95. It has beat and partials viewing among others, pretty easy to use.

http://www.cc-ast.com/icpianotuner.html

Bill
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withindale
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« Reply #18 on: January 15, 2014, 03:37:34 PM »

This "IC Piano Tuner" comes with a nominal price of $4.95. It has beat and partials viewing among others, pretty easy to use.

http://www.cc-ast.com/icpianotuner.html
Bill
Does it handle stretch in any way, such as with inharmonicity curves and offsets, as Tunelab for example?
Ian
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funpiano
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« Reply #19 on: January 20, 2014, 10:12:20 PM »

Ian,

"IC Piano Tuner" focuses more on the micro-aspects of individual string performance. It is easier and more accurate than Tunelab when you want to adjust a string according to the beats (as it provides thorough information for the beats). The beat curve is so amazingly useful for a beginner to "see" the beats, especially for the unison. It does not provide an inharmonicity curve in current version 2.0.1. A curve (which differs from one piano to the other) is helpful in understanding the stretch, but not so useful for piano tuning. A piano tuner relies on the beats (not the curve) to tune.

If you tune according to a frequency different from a standard one (such as 440Hz for A4), you can set all your target pitches up or down with the same shifts (such as -10 cents), in addition to the stretch. I notice many tuners like to set the pitches a little bit lower than the standards to reduce the stress on the piano, which may not be applicable for most pianos (which deviates from the original designed frequencies).

Bill   
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withindale
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« Reply #20 on: January 26, 2014, 12:09:28 AM »

Thanks, Bill. Looks like some good programming involved.
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perfect_pitch
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« Reply #21 on: January 26, 2014, 02:30:42 AM »

should get one of these  Grin
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ugAxXm2SAXw" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ugAxXm2SAXw</a>

Is it just me, or would piano tuners hate this as it would put them out of a job (for the most part), although I doubt that piano would be able to voice itself and regulate the hammers.
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lhorwinkle
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« Reply #22 on: January 26, 2014, 10:43:07 PM »

This idea is dead in the water.
- It uses heat to tune the strings. And the heat can only lower the pitch.
- When it's turned off, the piano goes out of tune again. Terrible for the piano.
- The video claims .001 cent accuracy. This is simply not possible. There is no such thing as a perfectly tuned piano, so there is no such thing as .001 cent accuracy. It's just hype at best ... or a deception at worst.
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withindale
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« Reply #23 on: January 26, 2014, 11:42:57 PM »

This idea is dead in the water.
- It uses heat to tune the strings. And the heat can only lower the pitch.
- When it's turned off, the piano goes out of tune again. Terrible for the piano.
- The video claims .001 cent accuracy. This is simply not possible. There is no such thing as a perfectly tuned piano, so there is no such thing as .001 cent accuracy. It's just hype at best ... or a deception at worst.
OT!
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perfect_pitch
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« Reply #24 on: January 27, 2014, 02:39:53 AM »

OT!

What the hell does that mean???
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