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Strange values in right hand (Read 1792 times)

Offline fuel925

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Strange values in right hand
« on: December 21, 2005, 12:34:18 PM »
Lets say you have a passage with 8 quavers in the RH, played over 6 quavers in the LH. This kind of thing happens a lot in Chopin's music, and i've just encountered the above example in a Field Nocturne.

I'm wondering, how do YOU tackle these sections? Do you try to make some kind of structure (deciding which notes to play together, and which to play inbetween), or do you just try and squash the RH notes into the time of the LH and best as possible?

Offline pianistimo

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Re: Strange values in right hand
«Reply #1 on: December 21, 2005, 01:08:04 PM »
divide it by two and you'll have 4 of those notes to 3.  boom ta-ta-ta boom (together, right, left, right, together).  that's half the measure.  focus on the evenness of one hand for awhile and then the other.

in some mozart piano concertos - some of these passages are actually coordinated more with the symphony so it doesn't sound like someone forgot and misplayed the notes. 


Offline fuel925

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Re: Strange values in right hand
«Reply #2 on: December 22, 2005, 07:35:14 PM »
divide it by two and you'll have 4 of those notes to 3.  boom ta-ta-ta boom (together, right, left, right, together).  that's half the measure.  focus on the evenness of one hand for awhile and then the other.
Is this the "official" way of doing these things, or the way that you personally find best? This particular part of the piece is driving me mad, I really want to learn to do these things.

Offline nightmarecinema

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Re: Strange values in right hand
«Reply #3 on: December 22, 2005, 07:56:36 PM »
Well you can either try and get the sound of the polyrhythm in your head, or you can just try and squish the four into the three (or 8 into 6). Both take a lot of work, but both ways the sound ends up becomind natural, and it isn't very difficult. Same with 2 against 3...I worked on both of these in all my spare time when I couldn't do anything else...boring math class, observation driving hour, that kind of thing. Just try and get it to fit.

Offline fuel925

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Re: Strange values in right hand
«Reply #4 on: December 23, 2005, 10:47:18 AM »
Well you can either try and get the sound of the polyrhythm in your head, or you can just try and squish the four into the three (or 8 into 6). Both take a lot of work, but both ways the sound ends up becomind natural, and it isn't very difficult. Same with 2 against 3...I worked on both of these in all my spare time when I couldn't do anything else...boring math class, observation driving hour, that kind of thing. Just try and get it to fit.
Performers on CD's always get it to sound so even, I have no idea how they do that ???