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Author Topic: Trills for Chopin Nocturne 9 no.2  (Read 3736 times)
lani
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« on: April 15, 2004, 09:17:21 PM »

My daughter would like any advice on techniques for practicing the trill at the end of the Nocturne.  So far her teacher has told her to "roll" the wrist and fingers and she has been trying do this everyday for five minutes or so, before it gets really tired.  To her, it is still not achieving the sound that we've heard played by her teacher or by the recordings we have (Jeno Jando, Naxos).  Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Thanks, Lani
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piano sheet music of Nocturne
ayahav
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« Reply #1 on: April 16, 2004, 01:44:06 AM »

If your daughter's wrist gets tired (she might also be feeling a burning sensation in her forearm), then it means she is getting tense. Have her try standing up and releasing all her muscles, and then breathe in an out deeply a few times. All trills should be performed with a completely relaxed arm, because tension tends to accumulate more quickly during faster passages (few things I know are faster than trills)... Also try a different fingering, sometimes that helps...

Cheerio... Amit
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jeff
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« Reply #2 on: April 16, 2004, 02:47:05 PM »

(for those who can't be bothered looking up the music, this trill is a fast repeated pattern of Cb-Bb-C-A in the right hand)

if i was learning this piece, i'd just use both hands for the trill  Grin but learning how to do it with one hand could be quite beneficial.

if you played this trill slowly with a very relaxed hand, you should notice that your fingers slightly pull the hand in the direction of each note you play. if you speed this motion up, the hand would appear to be "rolling". that would be why the teacher suggested using this action. the hand-'rolling' action is meant to aid the fingers, to give them less work to do, and therefore to make the whole thing easier.
Perhaps your daughter gets tired because she is exaggerating the rolling action too much when practicing. at first, exaggerating this movement when practicing the trill might help her get used to the idea of using her hand in that way to help her fingers, but it is impotant that she realises that when performing the trill, not very much hand movement is needed.
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dj
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« Reply #3 on: April 17, 2004, 07:15:20 AM »

hmmmm....actually, i never roll the wrist at all when i play this part, just let all the weight of your hand rest on the keyboard as your fingers should really be the only things doing any substantial movements....then slowly apply more pressure from the wrist and let off in the same manner to get the swelling of the sound....most importantly is to keep the hand relaxed at all times
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rach on!
lani
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« Reply #4 on: April 20, 2004, 12:56:07 AM »

By jove, I think she's got it!  Thanks, everyone.  The trill is finally getting there!  So nice to have your input. Regards, Lani Grin
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