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Guided Listening (Read 2315 times)

Offline Karli

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Guided Listening
« on: April 06, 2009, 04:16:42 PM »
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Offline scottmcc

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Re: Guided Listening
«Reply #1 on: April 07, 2009, 10:51:18 AM »
Let's have a course here  ;D.

Okay, but what I am really wondering is if you would describe the "kind" of listening you do when you spend time listening to music.  What are you listening for ?  As much detail as you are willing to go into would be appreciated. 

And, how many times do you listen to a piece of music or a particular artist before you start to feel that you know what it's/their "about" ?

Also, if you have taken any formal "guided listening" classes in school or otherwise, I would be very interested to learn what that was like.  What did you listen for ?  What did you listen to ?  That type of thing.  I don't think I had a formal course like this, though in my music history class we listened to some music just to learn of its existence.  I may have started a course for a couple of terms but transferred schools ... and I don't remember what the class was actually like.

Thanks :).

if you're going to start a thread like that, the least you could do is suggest a recording worth listening to.  I'll help:  Wilhelm Kempff complete Beethoven Sonatas.  Beautiful.

ok, now that that's out of the way, I listen in several different manners.  I almost always have some kind of music playing when I'm driving, as I do a lot of that for work.  But I'm usually not listening very intently to that, and certainly not "studying."  When I'm learning a piece, I try to find a good recording and listen to it several times with the score in front of me.  Sometimes I'll even listen to a few different recordings to compare interpretive ideas.  And of course, I like going to concerts but I live in an area that doesn't have the highest quality so I don't go too often.  But throughout, the reason I listen to music is enjoyment, not work, so my perspectives are different.

With each artist it's different regarding how many times I have to listen to a piece.  I usually know within a few seconds if I like a piece enough to keep going, but I really try to listen to the complete piece at least once before passing judgement.  But almost every piece of music worth listening to needs to be heard at least 3-4 times before I truly "get" it, and probably 10+ to really understand it.  I'm always confused when I read posts by people who say they have to listen to something 30 or more times to tell if they even like it.  That seems like a lot of wasted time, especially when there's so much likeable music out there.

I didn't take any music classes in school.

Offline go12_3

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Re: Guided Listening
«Reply #2 on: April 07, 2009, 12:18:51 PM »
While I was in college as a Piano Performance Major for a couple of years, one of the classes I took was Ear Training and that was an interesting class.  I had to listen to musical passages and identify each note.  Plus, the intervals.  I think that guided listening has begun when I was a little girl because music was within me.  I played a little toy piano and sang a lot.  I don't listen to a lot of music except when I drive somewhere; it is classical music.  When I want to learn a piece, I listen to it and it is easier for me to get the feel of the piece.  As a violinist for the past 8 years, the finger placement has to be perfect in order to play the correct notes.  And that has not been a problem because I could tell right away if I am off pitch.  I hear the music in my mind most of the time.  Sometimes I prefer silence just to rest my mind from listening and playing music.

best wishes,

go12_3 
Yesterday was the day that passed,
Today is the day I live and love,Tomorrow is day of hope and promises...

Offline m

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Re: Guided Listening
«Reply #3 on: April 08, 2009, 04:40:34 AM »
Many years ago I was teaching very similar class in college for quite some time. Usually, I'd take a few different interpretation and compare them. Since the art of interpretation (as any other art) is directly connected with historical aspects and values that was the very first starting point, which would lead to more detailed analysis in a form of essay.

Best, M

Offline Karli

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Re: Guided Listening
«Reply #4 on: April 09, 2009, 03:11:10 AM »
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Offline Karli

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Re: Guided Listening
«Reply #5 on: October 11, 2009, 02:14:17 PM »
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Offline goldentone

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Re: Guided Listening
«Reply #6 on: February 17, 2010, 07:37:24 AM »
The reason I only made it through 4 artists (out of 7 or 8 ) is because after those 4, it became very apparent to me, or at least it seemed (perhaps if I had persisted I would have learned otherwise), that I wasn't going to reach any kind of conclusion about anything.  It just confused me more.  I didn't understand why artists chose what they did, and that just made me angry.  It actually made me so mad I have never committed myself to doing anything quite like it again, and it's even a hidden reason that I sometimes don't want to listen to music in general ... hee hee ... though, that was now several years ago.

It occurred to me that possibly the reason you got so upset was that, having been unable to discern why the artists made their choices, you were left with the unsavory thought that interpretation reduces to merely one'e aesthetic inclinations, and has no real significance or meaning, as opposed to stars in their courses.   
For in that sleep of death what dreams may come

Offline Karli

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Re: Guided Listening
«Reply #7 on: February 18, 2010, 08:10:03 PM »
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