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Topic: Fingerings in Mozart K 283, I  (Read 6413 times)

Offline pianos1

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Fingerings in Mozart K 283, I
on: June 07, 2011, 01:49:08 PM
I'm working with G Schirmer's Mozart 19 sonatas edition, K 283.  Others have similar fingerings.

Having played K 545, with straightforward fingerings, I'm not following the logic of some of the fingerings in K 283.

All references to measure numbers assume that the pickup measure at the beginning is not counted, and measure 1 is the first complete measure.

I also assume the indicated tempo of 138/quarter note beat.

The following questions pertain to the right hand part.

In measure 2, last beat, why 4-2 for A-F# instead of 5-3?  With 5-3, the right hand would not have to travel as far.  The previous quarter rest covers the hand travel, but its still less efficient.

In measure 4, last beat, why 3-2 for G-F#?  Why not 4-3 or 5-4?  4-3 or 5-4 set up an easy five-finger-based pattern for the next measures.

In measure 5, first beat, why 3 for the F#, when 2 just played the same note at the end of the previous measure 4?

In measure 5, second beat, if 3 for F# and 2 for E, why 1 for the next E, which requires a hand shift?  Seems awkward if one plays the movement fast.  Same concept occurs in measure 6, first beat, with E-D.-D.

In measure 7, why alternate fingers on the Ds, which are slow quarter notes?

The following questions pertain to left-hand part.

In measure 7, 1-3 is indicated for the interval A-C.  What are good fingerings for the remaining two intervals plus the one in measure 8?

Every edition I've seen shows a curved line over all of measure 7 plus the first beat of measure 8.  Nonetheless, in every recording I've heard, these notes are played staccato.

Is the curved line a phrase mark or a slur mark?




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Offline le_poete_mourant

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Re: Fingerings in Mozart K 283, I
Reply #1 on: June 09, 2011, 03:26:25 PM
First of all, do yourself a favor and get an Urtext...the Schirmer is not a particularly scholarly edition. I suppose it will do for casual playing but for serious study you should get a serious edition. It's worth the extra money. I also think this edition has many gratuitous and unnecessary fingerings. I prefer less so that I can choose my own and not have to cross out a lot of editorial fingerings that I disagree with.

Also keep in mind that the metronome was not around in Mozart's time, so any metronome markings are purely editorial and you should feel free to disregard it if need be.

As to fingerings, every hand is different and therefore different things are comfortable for different people. However, I think I can answer some of these questions for you.

Quote
In measure 2, last beat, why 4-2 for A-F# instead of 5-3?
Feel free to use 5-3. I usually try to avoid using 4 when possible in cases like these because it is weaker.

Quote
In measure 4, last beat, why 3-2 for G-F#? Why not 4-3 or 5-4?  4-3 or 5-4 set up an easy five-finger-based pattern for the next measures.
This is related to your question about measure 5. 3-2 is a particularly solid fingering, and because of the two note slurs present on the final beat of measure 4 and the first beat of measure 5, playing this passage as a completely connected four finger pattern would be incorrect. The two-note slurs allow you to make a break between measure 4 and 5. This answers your question as to why 3 for the first F#. It is a stronger finger, and it is allowed by the way the music is notated.

Quote
In measure 5, second beat, if 3 for F# and 2 for E, why 1 for the next E, which requires a hand shift?  Seems awkward if one plays the movement fast.  Same concept occurs in measure 6, first beat, with E-D.-D.
I agree. Since there are two-note slurs preceding the repeated note, it would be fine to just use a 2. The thumb seems ungainly here.

Quote
In measure 7, why alternate fingers on the Ds, which are slow quarter notes?
It makes sense to use different fingers for the staccato articulation IF you want, but it is not necessary. You can achieve it with the same finger. This is a matter of preference. Fingering should also serve the purpose of achieving a good tone. If you can do it with one finger, great, but if you feel the sound is better with different fingers, do that.

Quote
In measure 7, 1-3 is indicated for the interval A-C.  What are good fingerings for the remaining two intervals plus the one in measure 8?
I think a better fingering would be 1-2 for the A-C, then 1-3 and 2-4. In this case I think it is more comfortable and stable than 1-3,2-4,3-5, especially because when you return to the G-B third, you will have a solid 1-3 fingering rather than the weak 2-4.

Quote
Every edition I've seen shows a curved line over all of measure 7 plus the first beat of measure 8.  Nonetheless, in every recording I've heard, these notes are played staccato.
I don't know whose recordings you've listened to, but I've never heard this. Unless there are staccatos written in, don't play it staccato. I recommend Uchida's recording.

Quote
Is the curved line a phrase mark or a slur mark?
I may be wrong about this, but I'd say it is a slur mark because it does not carry over to the next measure. If it were a phrase, it would probably extend to the resolution in measure 8.

I do hope this helps. Good luck with your study of this piece!

Offline pianos1

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Re: Fingerings in Mozart K 283, I
Reply #2 on: June 13, 2011, 12:51:49 PM
Thank you very much for your excellent and detailed instruction.

Regarding the slur marks over the LH parallel intervals in m. 7, in the G. Schirmer, the line continues into m. 8.  In the Alfred edition, it stops at the end of m. 7.  So I suppose it's a slur mark in the Alfred, and a phrase mark in the Schirmer?

Regarding the staccato intervals in m. 7, I listened more carefully to the John Chen recording, and the LH Is not playing staccato. 






 

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