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Topic: Trying to get back in playing the piano  (Read 1557 times)

Offline Ed4252

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Trying to get back in playing the piano
on: October 08, 2004, 04:37:55 PM
I've been playing the piano for around 7 years before...and I've stopped playing for around 5 years now...and I'm trying to play again and I'm trying to find some pieces to look and play


I used to play pieces like the Inventions by Bach, Fantasia in D Minor by Mozart, and the Haydn Concerto in D Major(1st movement) and Czerny and some other person that starts with a B for technique exercises---and played them very well...what grade would you put these pieces at?


What songs would you recommend me try and play? and should I start off with something easier and work my way back into it...has anyone stopped playing for a long time and had lots of trouble at first?


which one is the easiest Mozart Concerto and do you think I'll be able to play it?..and how hard is the Beethoven Concerto No.1

Offline Ed4252

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Re: Trying to get back in playing the piano
Reply #1 on: October 09, 2004, 06:19:58 PM
bump

Offline xvimbi

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Re: Trying to get back in playing the piano
Reply #2 on: October 09, 2004, 06:41:12 PM
Quote
bump

Not too sound too rude, but the "Search" function works really well on this site. ;)

IMO, you should start slowly and work your way back into the game by playing familiar pieces first.

Offline Ed4252

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Re: Trying to get back in playing the piano
Reply #3 on: October 09, 2004, 07:30:24 PM
I could find out what level the Bach Inventions were..but I couldn't find what level the Fantasia in D Minor by Mozart and the Haydn D Major Concerto 1st movement....I learned the Inventions a long time ago before I quit..and it isn't a really a good judgement on what I'm able to play.

Offline teresa_b

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Re: Trying to get back in playing the piano
Reply #4 on: October 09, 2004, 07:56:51 PM
Ed,

I took some time off from the piano for about 3 or 4 years (This was maybe 25 years ago now).  It was EASIER to get back into it than I thought, so by all means, go for it!  

I don't know grade levels, but you should probably start a little below that difficulty level, or you may get frustrated.   You can work your way up pretty quickly.

Maybe try the Bach Little Preludes and Fugues before going back to the Inventions.  What about Debussy's Arabesques, or perhaps some of Chopin's Preludes or Nocturnes?   (Some are treacherous, but others are not so difficult.)  Mozart's little Sonata in G  (K283) is lovely, and not too difficult.  Or K330 in C Major.

I am not familiar with an easy Mozart Piano Concerto!  You might look at No. 12 (K414) or 13 (K415).  For now, I would skip Nos. 14 and up.  

I played Beethoven No 1 back in college--Love that piece!  It is pretty challenging, though quite straightforward interpretively.  Technically, the rondo is the hardest to master, as it has tricky phrasing in the main theme, crossed-hands leaps at rapid pace, and the coda has that rather exhausting series of parallel scales!  

Have you played Beethoven's Op 79 Sonatina?  Fun, and a nice preparation for his more difficult stuff.

Hope this helps.
Teresa
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