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Two-Hands C Position: How Long? (Read 3882 times)

Offline florentin

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Re: Two-Hands C Position: How Long?
«Reply #50 on: November 04, 2013, 05:59:33 PM »
Florentin, what do you think of the idea that a student can find D via the two black keys, and thus does not need to rely on hand position to do so?

I offered this a week ago.  I have asked several times.  Will there be a response?

Too many posts to read, and to reply to, on both boards :)
Your idea did not go ignored.

I am working on a post right now, and your reference to the D being between the two black keys is part of it. I will return in a day or two with that post, but I'll do it in the other place. There seems to be more dialogue there.

Sorry I didn't respond to your reference. I saw it.
Thanks for the reminder.
"Piano Devotions For Little Fingers" Book/CD
Original Hymn Arrangements
Score Story Lesson  Devotion
http://www.florentintise.com/

Offline faulty_damper

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Re: Two-Hands C Position: How Long?
«Reply #51 on: November 04, 2013, 09:26:04 PM »
Stating that you have discovered what you think is a more effective way to teach is ok. You are not alone in that. We all improve ourselves continually.
I'm playing an entirely different game.  I've shown many teachers exactly what it is that I do that gets the results that they can't.  It's because they are still playing the old pedagogical game that they are blinded because they are trying to fit what I do to what they do.

Quote
Stating that all educators in the public school system "suck", as you put it, is simply insensitive, untrue, and plain rude. One does not need any research literature to arrive at this conclusion.
I dont' state that.  The literature implies that.  I also never said "all" teachers suck as you say, but most do.  There's a reason why the US lags so far behind most industrialized countries, behind Finland and S. Korea.  http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/11/27/best-education-in-the-wor_n_2199795.html

And yes, you'd have to look at the literature to arrive to the conclusion that most teachers aren't very effective.  The assumption that all teachers are good is a myth perpetuated by poor performing teachers.

Offline faulty_damper

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Re: Two-Hands C Position: How Long?
«Reply #52 on: November 04, 2013, 09:28:44 PM »
Faulty, I have also done tons of research, both in reading and in the field by talking to and observing people.  You seem to dismiss everything that I have done, as though you already know what it is, which you cannot do.  What if I stated that whatever you are saying is myth and excuses, without having a clue what you do?  It is the same thing.

Sounds like you and I have done exactly the same thing.  And no, I didn't dismiss anything you've done as I don't know what you've done.  Also, I have evidence to back up everything I've stated in this thread.  Notice that neither you, nor anyone else, provided any kind of evidence to the contrary.  There's a reason for that: it doesn't exist.  Instead, the counter argument is to appeal to some sense of moral ground like feeling good has anything to do with it.

Offline florentin

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Re: Two-Hands C Position: How Long?
«Reply #53 on: November 05, 2013, 12:52:09 AM »
I dont' state that.  The literature implies that.  I also never said "all" teachers suck as you say, but most do.

You are twisting your own writing. Of course, it's going to feel natural for you to twist the writings of others... go back and see what you wrote. Does your writing "imply" that you are referring to most or all?

Even to say that most teachers do "suck", and that you found a way to do it differently, even though you no longer teach... would take a lot of arrogance.

You see the Huffington as literature?
"Piano Devotions For Little Fingers" Book/CD
Original Hymn Arrangements
Score Story Lesson  Devotion
http://www.florentintise.com/

Offline faulty_damper

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Re: Two-Hands C Position: How Long?
«Reply #54 on: November 05, 2013, 03:37:45 AM »
Do you even realize that I am trying to help teachers?  Of course not!  Because I'm telling you things you don't want to hear.

What you want to hear is that all teachers are great and can do no wrong.  I am not the deluded one.

Offline j_menz

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Re: Two-Hands C Position: How Long?
«Reply #55 on: November 05, 2013, 03:42:51 AM »
Am I the only one here who doesn't know what "C position" is?
"What the world needs is more geniuses with humility. There are so few of us left" -- Oscar Levant

Offline florentin

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Re: Two-Hands C Position: How Long?
«Reply #56 on: November 05, 2013, 03:50:36 AM »
Do you even realize that I am trying to help teachers? 

Glad you cleared that up, because you had me all confused :)
"Piano Devotions For Little Fingers" Book/CD
Original Hymn Arrangements
Score Story Lesson  Devotion
http://www.florentintise.com/

Offline florentin

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Re: Two-Hands C Position: How Long?
«Reply #57 on: November 05, 2013, 03:55:43 AM »
Am I the only one here who doesn't know what "C position" is?

C Position means that the LH pinky starts on the low C and the RH thumb starts on Middle C. Many traditional piano books will start there. Some books will start on Middle C Position, where both thumbs start on middle C.
"Piano Devotions For Little Fingers" Book/CD
Original Hymn Arrangements
Score Story Lesson  Devotion
http://www.florentintise.com/

Offline keypeg

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Re: Two-Hands C Position: How Long?
«Reply #58 on: November 05, 2013, 01:15:44 PM »
C Position means that the LH pinky starts on the low C and the RH thumb starts on Middle C. Many traditional piano books will start there. Some books will start on Middle C Position, where both thumbs start on middle C.
I read a lot of discussions on this when I first joined the piano forums.  Apparently a lot of the older books would start with music that was in C major, and comprised the 5 notes from C to G which could be played with fingers 1 - 5 each perched over an adjacent key.  This becomes a "position".  Later the student learns to perch the hand over G to D, and this becomes the "G position".  Eventually this gets expanded.

In the discussions I read, teachers found that students ended up associating piano keys with fingers and positions, rather than as addresses where you go to fetch the note you want to play.  Since these older books kept to these positions for a long time, the kids became fearful about moving out of these positions that had been "home".  It was a big deal.  Most teachers were avoiding these old position-based books by the time I joined the fora.

Offline Mayla

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Re: Two-Hands C Position: How Long?
«Reply #59 on: November 05, 2013, 03:41:55 PM »
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"The greatest thing in this world is not so much where we are, but in what direction we are moving"  ~Oliver Wendell Holmes

Offline faulty_damper

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Re: Two-Hands C Position: How Long?
«Reply #60 on: November 05, 2013, 05:13:23 PM »
In the discussions I read, teachers found that students ended up associating piano keys with fingers and positions, rather than as addresses where you go to fetch the note you want to play. 

Students were also reading finger numbers, not note heads, and were not even consciously aware that there were 5 lines per staff.  In regards to keyboard geography, they didn't have any concept of playing sharps and learned to avoid them at all costs.  If they had to reach far away for 1 note, they would immediately place their hand back into C position even if the very next note was next to that 1 note.  These are some of the reasons I don't teach hand positions because it can quickly become a prison.

Instead, by focusing on the music, the position of the hand becomes intuitive because they are aiming for a musical goal.  In other words, they know that a key will produce a certain pitch in a melody.  This takes longer but it's an important skill.  This also allows them to improvise since they've associated keys with pitches, instead of keys with notes.  One is musical, the other a typewriter.

Offline keypeg

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Re: Two-Hands C Position: How Long?
«Reply #61 on: November 05, 2013, 05:47:28 PM »
Students were also reading finger numbers, not note heads, and were not even consciously aware that there were 5 lines per staff.  In regards to keyboard geography, they didn't have any concept of playing sharps and learned to avoid them at all costs.  If they had to reach far away for 1 note, they would immediately place their hand back into C position even if the very next note was next to that 1 note.  These are some of the reasons I don't teach hand positions because it can quickly become a prison.

Instead, by focusing on the music, the position of the hand becomes intuitive because they are aiming for a musical goal.  In other words, they know that a key will produce a certain pitch in a melody.  This takes longer but it's an important skill.  This also allows them to improvise since they've associated keys with pitches, instead of keys with notes.  One is musical, the other a typewriter.
That is a good synopsis of the types of things I was reading about.  I was never exposed to them myself.

Offline Mayla

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Re: Two-Hands C Position: How Long?
«Reply #62 on: November 06, 2013, 04:03:35 PM »
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"The greatest thing in this world is not so much where we are, but in what direction we are moving"  ~Oliver Wendell Holmes

Offline faulty_damper

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Re: Two-Hands C Position: How Long?
«Reply #63 on: November 06, 2013, 06:05:43 PM »
I'm generally against writing fingerings because then they start to read fingers and not noteheads.  A quick test to see if they are reading fingerings or noteheads is to change the finger numbers within a group. If they play the correct melody, then they are reading noteheads.  If they play according to the fingerings, it'll sound bad.