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The Musical Brain, PBS documentary (Read 865 times)

Offline Bob

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The Musical Brain, PBS documentary
« on: November 07, 2015, 06:29:27 AM »
http://www.shoppbs.org/product/index.jsp?productId=13115442

Got it from the library.  Worth watching, although I'm not remembering any huge new insights.

copyright 2012

Focuses lot on Sting as the highlighted musician.

Definitely not worth $20 to buy though. ::)
Favorite new teacher quote -- "You found the only possible wrong answer."

Offline hardy_practice

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Re: The Musical Brain, PBS documentary
«Reply #1 on: November 07, 2015, 06:39:09 AM »
Does he play the lute?
B Mus, PGCE, DipABRSM

Offline Bob

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Re: The Musical Brain, PBS documentary
«Reply #2 on: November 07, 2015, 01:07:05 PM »
Haha.  They had some large multi-stringed instrument in it...

Yep, I guess it was a lute.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lute

He taught himself. ::) Because he likes to learn.  Had to make new connections in his brain for the fingering for each note.  Gave him a different perspective/insight into music.

That was about it.  Now I've spoiled the 30 second lute blurb from it. :P


Guess so... Here he is.
Favorite new teacher quote -- "You found the only possible wrong answer."

Offline hardy_practice

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Re: The Musical Brain, PBS documentary
«Reply #3 on: November 07, 2015, 01:15:01 PM »
Probably pretentious twaddle in that case.
B Mus, PGCE, DipABRSM

Offline Bob

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Re: The Musical Brain, PBS documentary
«Reply #4 on: November 11, 2015, 12:39:08 AM »
I always wonder what they mean... specifically what it means... when a pop musician is supposedly doing something new, different, daring, that type of thing. 

If they really did, they'd be music history, right? 


Modulate the piece to an unusual key center and make that standard... That's new and different.
New form, modes, etc.... That was different once.
Orchestration

After the first person does it, it's not so revolutionary anymore. 


What's so innovative about a piece of music that follows patterns well worn?  Form, 4/4 time, same length of time, build to a climax, etc. 


I was kind of laughing in the documentary when they said Sting's music fits the patterns for popular music.  Depending on how you take that... A computer (assuming it can measure aesthetics) says x-piece fits lots of criteria that makes it "good" music vs. A computer says x-piece matches the same patterns as many other pieces of music which are popular/considered "good."  And then did it just happen to end up that way or was it composed more by formula?  Even if it "flows smoothly" for the composition, it could still be following a pattern.  Or someone could be intentionally following a pattern but not consider that a negative.  We did x in a section... so now we need something different in a new section.... 
Favorite new teacher quote -- "You found the only possible wrong answer."