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Topic: Repetoire - grade 5ish  (Read 4658 times)

Offline potentialpianist

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Repetoire - grade 5ish
on: December 30, 2015, 10:17:41 PM
Hi,

I've been playing piano for the last 9 years  but only started reading sheet music last year - which was a little stupid of me as I'm now 17 and my grasp of sheet music isn't quite what I'd like it to be. I began to get lessons last year and quit about 4 months ago as I wasn't getting along too well with my teacher. I'm at around a grade 5 standard and I've been tackling Moonlight sonata (1st mvt) recently and I was wondering  if anyone could recommend some other pieces to get under my belt? I know there are probably a million threads just like this floating around but I'm having some difficulty finding them! I'm trying to develop my technique myself for a while until I've gathered together the money for a new teacher. I've recently learnt Raindrop prelude (Chopin) and Primavera by Einaudi.

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated

thanks!
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Offline abbyes

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Re: Repetoire - grade 5ish
Reply #1 on: December 30, 2015, 10:36:50 PM
If you didnt learn to read sheets until last year, it will be a bit difficult even if you have the technique to play harder pieces, but I think that if you've been playing piano for 9 years, you'll make it work out with some effort. You have to take care of the technique, the phrasing and expresion while playing. The first step to learn every piece, is to learn to play it mechanically, and after that, the expression, the sound, the colours will flourish ! Repeating and repeating is the key, but dont over effort your hands, you can injure yourself. You'll find reading sheets easier and easier in time, as long as you practice it continuely.

There are many pieces you can start, from many composers, maybe if you give us some more information, like if you want any specific composer, style...

I'll try to give you some according to your reading leveel :

 - Enrique Granados ( Spanish composer ) - Oriental dance ( Spanish dance nº2 )


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It is an easy piece to read and learn. The only difficult of this piece may be those 3-4 trills on the right hand, and the expression. It's very beautiful.



- Gabriel Fauré - Sicilianne



A very enchanting and bewitching piece, it's not hard to read, but it is a 2 voiced piece, it may be hard at the begining learning how to fit those notes in a 6/8, but eventualy it will become naturaly if you give a chance to this piece. It's very beautiful, I enjoyed a lot playing this a long time ago.


- Chopin : Waltz in A minor , op posth.

[/youtube]

If you wanna give Chopin a chance once more, you can try out this beautiful Waltz. Simple, easy to learn, and basic technique. It's short, but it may be too easy for you :p


If you wanna develope your technique, you should play some studies also and scales ( I do not recommend Hanon excercices...at least not exclusively)

You can start by some Czerny op 299, school of velocity, any number is good, for example nº7:

[/youtube]

It may sound hard, but it's a very basic study, very easy to read and you do not have to play it at this speed....I played it much slower when I had to and still sounded good.



If you didnt like it or want any other pieces from other composers, then tell me and I'll give you some others, or maybe another person here :P


Offline boxjuice

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Re: Repetoire - grade 5ish
Reply #2 on: January 03, 2016, 10:35:36 PM
If youre trying to improve your technique, the best grade 5 piece i can think of is Mozart's sonata in c k545. It sounds easy, but it' simplicity exposes any deficiencies in your technique.

Another cool piece I can think of is Debussy's Girl With the Flaxen Hair.

Offline potentialpianist

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Re: Repetoire - grade 5ish
Reply #3 on: January 04, 2016, 01:19:34 AM
Thank you Abbyes for your suggestions, I love all of the pieces you've suggested, especially Fauré's Sicilienne!

BoxJuice - Thank you for your suggestion, I may try it next to see which areas of technique I need to improve on most!:)

Offline abbyes

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Re: Repetoire - grade 5ish
Reply #4 on: January 04, 2016, 01:32:35 PM
Thank you Abbyes for your suggestions, I love all of the pieces you've suggested, especially Fauré's Sicilienne!

BoxJuice - Thank you for your suggestion, I may try it next to see which areas of technique I need to improve on most!:)



You're welcome, I'm glad you liked it. If you need any help with the piece or anything, contact me.

Best wishes !  ;)

Offline aweshana21

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Re: Repetoire - grade 5ish
Reply #5 on: January 22, 2016, 02:48:38 AM
The Fantasia in Dminor by Mozart, Beethoven moonlight sonata mvt 2, and panthiteque mvt 2

Offline outin

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Re: Repetoire - grade 5ish
Reply #6 on: January 22, 2016, 04:33:29 AM
Look into the Scarlatti sonatas, there's plenty of variation, most are doable for you and learning them properly is excellent for  developing your technique and the precision of your playing.

Offline shostglass

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Re: Repetoire - grade 5ish
Reply #7 on: January 22, 2016, 05:52:04 AM
The beethoven baby sonatas(op.49) can't hurt
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