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Topic: Potential Audition Repertoire  (Read 1782 times)

Offline abel2

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Potential Audition Repertoire
on: January 10, 2016, 04:37:46 AM
I'm thinking about doing the first movement of the Tempest sonata for my sonata. That's basically all I have finalized, but I know I'll have to do a P/F, and an etude would look good, maybe Liszt S. 141 No. 5 or Chopin Op. 10 No. 6. I'm wondering about Romantic works; if I played a couple Chopin Nocturnes would that be like one large Romantic work showcasing musicality? And I'm absolutely lost as to modern works (Impressionistic/, 20th and 21th Century); could anyone recommend something?
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Offline rubinsteinmad

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Re: Potential Audition Repertoire
Reply #1 on: January 10, 2016, 05:12:52 AM
I don't think a couple of nocturnes would satisfy the demand of "large romantic work", but if you do a complete opus, it might be okay; ask some of the more senior members.

For the 20-21st century work, if it is allowed to do Impressionism, then I'd suggest maybe:
Debussy: the complete Estampes, or a piece from there. Equally beautiful are Images I. For less technical demands, you could try Images Oubliees or even the Pour le Piano. You could also do a movement from one of those works if there is a time limit.
Ravel: the Jeux d'eau is a nice piece, but very technically demanding. Could you tell some of your current repertoire, so we can get a feel of what you may want?
Prokofiev: Prokofiev's Sonata #2, IV is very popular. Among the less dissonant works are the 10 Pieces from Romeo and Juliet. Usually, people choose movements from the 10 pieces. Another, more violent option is the Suggestions Diabolique Op. 4 #4.
Barber Barber's Excursion Op. 20 #3 is very beautiful. Written in 1945, it turns a simple tune of "On the Streets of Laredo" into an expressive work.
Shostakovich Shostakovich wrote some Preludes and Fugues, but it might not be very good to have 2 P/F's on your program. However, you might think differently.
Tcherepnin Alexander Tcherepnin wrote Bagatelles Op. 5, some of them which are exquisite (but may not be to your liking if you dislike dissonance.) For his less dissonant works, his Concert Etude Op. 52 #3 "Punch and Judy" is fantastic, if you can bring out the Chinese-ness of it (which not many recordings can.)
Gershwin His most famous piano solo work is the set of 3 preludes, the most familiar being the Prelude #1. Zimerman made a fantastic recording of it.
GinasteraDanzas Argentina #2 and Danza Criolla #1 are beautiful.
Wild Earl Wild's Etude over Gershwin's "Embraceable You" is kind of popular. It is a beautiful piece.
Kapustin Check out his Etudes Op. 40; they're super cool. Everyone has different favorites, but my favorites are nos. 3, 6, and 7. However, I don't think it's a good idea to choose Kapustin, it just sounds weird.

Offline abel2

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Re: Potential Audition Repertoire
Reply #2 on: January 10, 2016, 06:08:19 AM
I don't think a couple of nocturnes would satisfy the demand of "large romantic work", but if you do a complete opus, it might be okay; ask some of the more senior members.

For the 20-21st century work, if it is allowed to do Impressionism, then I'd suggest maybe:
Debussy: the complete Estampes, or a piece from there. Equally beautiful are Images I. For less technical demands, you could try Images Oubliees or even the Pour le Piano. You could also do a movement from one of those works if there is a time limit.
Ravel: the Jeux d'eau is a nice piece, but very technically demanding. Could you tell some of your current repertoire, so we can get a feel of what you may want?
Prokofiev: Prokofiev's Sonata #2, IV is very popular. Among the less dissonant works are the 10 Pieces from Romeo and Juliet. Usually, people choose movements from the 10 pieces. Another, more violent option is the Suggestions Diabolique Op. 4 #4.
Barber Barber's Excursion Op. 20 #3 is very beautiful. Written in 1945, it turns a simple tune of "On the Streets of Laredo" into an expressive work.
Shostakovich Shostakovich wrote some Preludes and Fugues, but it might not be very good to have 2 P/F's on your program. However, you might think differently.
Tcherepnin Alexander Tcherepnin wrote Bagatelles Op. 5, some of them which are exquisite (but may not be to your liking if you dislike dissonance.) For his less dissonant works, his Concert Etude Op. 52 #3 "Punch and Judy" is fantastic, if you can bring out the Chinese-ness of it (which not many recordings can.)
Gershwin His most famous piano solo work is the set of 3 preludes, the most familiar being the Prelude #1. Zimerman made a fantastic recording of it.
GinasteraDanzas Argentina #2 and Danza Criolla #1 are beautiful.
Wild Earl Wild's Etude over Gershwin's "Embraceable You" is kind of popular. It is a beautiful piece.
Kapustin Check out his Etudes Op. 40; they're super cool. Everyone has different favorites, but my favorites are nos. 3, 6, and 7. However, I don't think it's a good idea to choose Kapustin, it just sounds weird.

I'm not so hot on impressionism, but I like some of the difficult Ravel. I do enjoy Prokofiev. And I would never play more contrapuntal writing than necessary xD. Thanks for the ideas!!

Offline rubinsteinmad

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Re: Potential Audition Repertoire
Reply #3 on: January 11, 2016, 12:18:47 AM
If you like Prokofiev, I'd suggest to choose some selections from the Visions Fugitives. Also, the Sonata #4, III is very snazzy.
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