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"sec" and "sempre sec"; what do they mean? (Read 2646 times)

Offline chopinlover01

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"sec" and "sempre sec"; what do they mean?
« on: August 17, 2016, 08:40:05 PM »
Hi, all. I'm engraving Ernesto Nazareth's "Odeon", for practice, personal use, and possibly sale (as it is in the public domain, but my editorials are not).
My question: what is the translation of "sec" as applied to this score? It appears to have a similar usage as decrescendo, but "menos" (less) is also featured later in the score.
For reference,


First occurrence: Measure 2 of line 2.

Second occurrence: Measure 3 of line 4.

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Offline quantum

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Re: "sec" and "sempre sec"; what do they mean?
«Reply #1 on: August 17, 2016, 09:38:59 PM »
Likely referring to secco meaning dry.

Generally translating in piano terms as don't use pedal, though you don't need to take that literally. 
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Offline marijn1999

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Re: "sec" and "sempre sec"; what do they mean?
«Reply #2 on: August 17, 2016, 09:52:05 PM »
It's a French musical term meaning "dry", or in a more practical way, played in such a way that the played tone doesn't reverbrate.
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Offline chopinlover01

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Re: "sec" and "sempre sec"; what do they mean?
«Reply #3 on: August 17, 2016, 10:13:47 PM »
Many thanks, friends!
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