Piano Forum logo
November 23, 2017, 05:24:28 AM *
   Forum Home   Help Search  


Sit in on a Unique Class with Messiaen on Debussy and Colour

French composer Olivier Messiaen was a synaesthete who experienced colours when he heard or imagined music. He devised his own system of modes (scales) based on his synaesthesia and in some scores he actually notated the colours, to help the performer in interpretation. Here is a unique video clip from one of his famous classes at the Paris Conservatoire. Read more >>

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Analyzing Chopin Nocturne Op.9 No.2  (Read 3085 times)
ranjit
PS Silver Member
Jr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 73


« on: January 16, 2017, 05:03:32 AM »

I've recently learned Chopin Nocturne Op.9 No.2. I know basic chords, and chord progressions (diatonic). Can someone explain how the chords in the left hand work? Surely Chopin must have had something in mind while composing this piece. I can not seem to find the analysis of the chords in the piece (i.e., why he had used the chords where he had used them and how one chord is "leading" to another) anywhere.

Suggestions for books are also welcome.
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged
brogers70
PS Silver Member
Sr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 817


« Reply #1 on: January 16, 2017, 11:23:58 AM »

Here's a youtube playing the piece (mechanically) while showing the score marked up with all the chords.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pllmVIJnqwg

Here's an article analysing the piece in detail.

http://resoundforever.tumblr.com/post/2376850291/analysis-of-frederic-chopins-op-9-no-2

They showed up in a Google search of "chopin nocturne op 9 no 2 harmonic analysis," along with lots of other links that might be interesting to you.
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged
ranjit
PS Silver Member
Jr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 73


« Reply #2 on: January 16, 2017, 12:34:46 PM »

Thanks for the links! They are quite useful.

I was wondering if I could use these chord structures for composition/improvisation, but I could not make much sense out of the chord progressions. (As a side question, is the term 'chord progression' used for classical music?) Are such chord progressions studied in music theory? If so, can you suggest some good resources (books, webpages) which teach these?
Thanks.
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged
brogers70
PS Silver Member
Sr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 817


« Reply #3 on: January 16, 2017, 09:58:43 PM »

You might enjoy this free course on Coursera. It's called "Write like Mozart," but it's really a course on standard harmonies in common period classical music (Baroque, Classical, Early Romantic) more than a course about composing in Mozart's style. The course just started today, so you won't have any catching up to do.

https://www.coursera.org/learn/classical-composition

Also, you can browse around the course list of references to find other material on music theory and chord progressions.

Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged
ranjit
PS Silver Member
Jr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 73


« Reply #4 on: January 17, 2017, 05:05:11 AM »

Wow! That's exactly what I needed! Grin
The course looks absolutely fantastic!

P.S. What do you think about Schoenberg Theory of Harmony?
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged
brogers70
PS Silver Member
Sr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 817


« Reply #5 on: January 17, 2017, 12:57:48 PM »

I haven't read Scoenberg's Theory of Harmony. My impression is that it is, for example, quite a bit more difficult than that course I recommended. You can get a used reprint on Amazon for not much more than $10, so it would not be a great loss if you had to put off using it until you worked through something more introductory.
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged
athrun200
PS Silver Member
Newbie
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 7


« Reply #6 on: January 18, 2017, 10:04:22 AM »

You might enjoy this free course on Coursera. It's called "Write like Mozart," but it's really a course on standard harmonies in common period classical music (Baroque, Classical, Early Romantic) more than a course about composing in Mozart's style. The course just started today, so you won't have any catching up to do.

https://www.coursera.org/learn/classical-composition

Wow. This course is what I need too.
Thanks for the recommandation Smiley
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged
ranjit
PS Silver Member
Jr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 73


« Reply #7 on: August 27, 2017, 07:41:50 AM »

Sorry for reviving this thread, but this post seems most appropriate here, since it is a follow-up to the previous posts.

I have completed the Coursera course. However, it does not go into enough detail for me to analyze this Chopin Nocturne. I still do not get how Chopin makes the harmonies work, in music theoretic terms. He uses half-diminished chords and whatnot, and I can not make sense of them in context. How do I approach learning this?
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged
adodd81802
PS Silver Member
Sr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 1038


« Reply #8 on: August 29, 2017, 09:14:21 AM »


Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged

"England is a country of pianos, they are everywhere."
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  


Need more info or help?


Search pianostreet.com - the web's largest resource of information about piano playing:



 
Jump to:  


Most popular classical piano composers:
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2006-2007, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!

o