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Mozart Can Tell the Difference

For the first time in the history of The Cliburn Competition, semifinalists were required to perform a Mozart concerto. This was not only based on the fact that the Cliburn Foundation’s CEO Jacques Marquis is a classical concerto fan, but rather from the aim of judging how competitors show musical maturity and the delicate world of the Austrian master. Read more >>

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Author Topic: Should I increase my piano lesson price?  (Read 694 times)
pianist21
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« on: July 07, 2017, 09:37:07 PM »

I know a similar topic was being recently being discussed on the board, but I was curious about my situation. I have been teaching for 5 years, and while I was working on my bachelor's degree, I was charging $15 per 30 minute lesson. I just graduated in May with my piano performance degree and have been contemplating increasing my price a bit. I am now working on my Masters in piano pedagogy and was thinking of charging $20 per 30 minute lesson. Do you think this would be an appropriate price? I live in a relatively wealthy area. Thank you so much!
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klavieronin
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« Reply #1 on: July 07, 2017, 10:07:29 PM »

I don't think you are charging nearly enough. If there is a music teacher's association or something where you live I would ask them what they recommend. For example, the Music Teachers' Association
of New South Wales (where I live) recommends $90 per hour for individual lessons and $120 for group lessons.
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timothy42b
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« Reply #2 on: July 10, 2017, 12:35:42 PM »

In my area teachers charge between $25 and $50 per half hour, depending on reputation and results. 

At your level you are still at the low end of this BUT you should not go below $25 per half hour or your students will not think you are a professional and they will not respect your advice. 
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Tim
adodd81802
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« Reply #3 on: July 10, 2017, 02:49:46 PM »

My area which is reasonably average is approx £25-35 per hour, with prices and time between 30-60 minutes and prices varying. I'd definitely say $25 per half hour is reasonable with some discount towards more time
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whistlestop
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« Reply #4 on: August 01, 2017, 01:02:58 PM »

If you have gained an additional qualification then it seems an opportune time to reconsider your prices. It doesn't look such a big hike to me, although I'm not sure what kind of $s you mean -US or otherwise.
I have a Masters in instrumental tuition and doubt it would cut much ice where I live, and am still trying to build up a client base so need to keep fees on the accessible side (£13 per 30 mins if a block of 5 is booked;£15 per 30 mins pay-as-you-go).
If I found I had a full timetable I'd certainly think about increasing it by a £ or 2 per hr every 2-3 years.
Other professions would do it...
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quantum
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« Reply #5 on: August 05, 2017, 09:14:40 AM »

Take a survey of your area, and see what people of similar qualifications are charging.  It will give you an idea of what the local market supports. 
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Made a Liszt. Need new Handel's for Soler panel & Alkan foil. Will Faure Stein on the way to pick up Mendels' sohn. Josquin get Wolfgangs Schu with Clara. Gone Chopin, I'll be Bach
timothy42b
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« Reply #6 on: August 05, 2017, 01:59:11 PM »

Take a survey of your area, and see what people of similar qualifications are charging.  It will give you an idea of what the local market supports. 

That's a good idea, but I'm not sure how you'd do it.  It is not as simple as driving around looking at the signs for gas prices. 

Interestingly, the AGO (American Guild of Organists) lost a court case this year about setting standard rates a professional organist could expect to get for performances like a church service, wedding, funeral, choir rehearsal, etc.  The court ruled this was illegal price fixing, and forced them to take the rates off their web site. 
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Tim
quantum
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« Reply #7 on: August 05, 2017, 07:27:47 PM »

That's a good idea, but I'm not sure how you'd do it.  It is not as simple as driving around looking at the signs for gas prices.  

If one is in the business of teaching music, one has to put the word out that such a service is available.   Imagine you are the student looking for a teacher, where would you look?  

For starters you could look up your local Registered Music Teacher Association, and ask for a list of teachers.  


Interestingly, the AGO (American Guild of Organists) lost a court case this year about setting standard rates a professional organist could expect to get for performances like a church service, wedding, funeral, choir rehearsal, etc.  The court ruled this was illegal price fixing, and forced them to take the rates off their web site.  

Thankfully the Royal Canadian College of Organists still has their recommended salary table.  Lets hope it stays.  Would still be useful reference to our American friends, as the RCCO and AGO recognize each others diplomas.  
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Made a Liszt. Need new Handel's for Soler panel & Alkan foil. Will Faure Stein on the way to pick up Mendels' sohn. Josquin get Wolfgangs Schu with Clara. Gone Chopin, I'll be Bach
bee1234
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« Reply #8 on: September 13, 2017, 12:53:35 AM »

my suggestion is if you increase your price, you will lost piano student, because this day parents take music lesson for fun, not a must only some parents take music lesson as high school credit, usually piano teacher that can charge a very high price should be very famous and musician , that they finish music university from a very famous school and their student are very success win lots of piano competition and some after they complete all the requirement from the piano teacher they can get refer from piano teacher for enough marks to refer to their favorite famous university for music degree with music scholarship, every thing is getting so expensive, and piano lesson is not a must, if you increase the price parents will feel its too expensive, when there are so many teacher in your area they can choose maybe their experience and education is higher than you, but same price, than they will think of why i must take lesson from you when they have so many choice, so i dont agree with increse your price unless you are very famous and expert that parents are so willing to pay think you deserve this price for your music degree education!!!!!!!
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