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Author Topic: Expanding our chord “colour pallet” with Modal Interchange (Borrowed chord)  (Read 374 times)
wkmt
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« on: July 14, 2017, 11:32:06 AM »

Gisela Paterno, our Senior Composition teacher, talks about the famous borrowed chord and how to implement it when composing as increasing the harmonisation resources.

Read the full article here:

http://www.piano-composer-teacher-london.co.uk/single-post/Modal-interchange-or-borrowed-chord


WKMT Ltd.
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keypeg
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« Reply #1 on: July 14, 2017, 08:56:03 PM »

It would be interesting to hear from musicians working on the area of jazz and similar.  I have a feeling that alternate chords are not seen in these terms.  The diatonic type of view, which we generally see in these essays, is a kind of traditional theory that I first learned when starting out, where the theory books themselves warn in small print that it is a simplified view belonging to a Baroque and Common Practice era, which in itself is extremely simplified.
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wkmt
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« Reply #2 on: July 16, 2017, 11:39:26 AM »

That's very true! We are trying hard to keep up with providing resources on that field. You will see some coming from us very soon.
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keypeg
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« Reply #3 on: July 16, 2017, 05:16:18 PM »

That's very true! We are trying hard to keep up with providing resources on that field. You will see some coming from us very soon.
To be honest, I would be interested in hearing from musicians who teach and play jazz, HERE.  I can understand the write-up, which is diatonic-based.   I have a strong feeling that this is not how musicians working in that genre think.  It feels complicated and contrived.  While I have studied a bit in this area, I don't have the expertise to go further than this hunch.

I've changed the title in the hope that someone from the jazz community could pop in, since the original title would probably appear unfamiliar.
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wkmt
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« Reply #4 on: July 20, 2017, 03:57:46 PM »

It would be interesting to hear from musicians working on the area of jazz and similar.  I have a feeling that alternate chords are not seen in these terms.  The diatonic type of view, which we generally see in these essays, is a kind of traditional theory that I first learned when starting out, where the theory books themselves warn in small print that it is a simplified view belonging to a Baroque and Common Practice era, which in itself is extremely simplified.

i totally agree! Actually, it is wonderful how inspirational Jazz Harmonies for any kind of composition student. They should never be missed.
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