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Author Topic: Artificial Inteligence making music!  (Read 187 times)
wkmt
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« on: August 01, 2017, 04:20:47 PM »

Alex Lopez, Conductor, concert pianist and our Senior teacher, explores the idea of composing music by Artificial Intelligence. Do not miss it out!

Read our full article here and get in touch with the latest practice of composing music:
http://www.piano-composer-teacher-london.co.uk/single-post/Artificial-Inteligence-making-music
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stevensk
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« Reply #1 on: August 01, 2017, 06:29:00 PM »


-I ordered my artificial intelligence robot to read it. For the moment I´m preoccupied of learning and making quite common human music. And that's just enough  Grin
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wkmt
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« Reply #2 on: August 05, 2017, 10:16:42 AM »

That's quite a good attitude, the more we do that the less risk of getting surpassed by robots  Grin
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ted
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« Reply #3 on: August 05, 2017, 11:02:37 AM »

David Cope has extended similar artificial intelligence code to imitate many styles of composers of the past; some of his results are on YouTube.

I suggest you don't really need artificial intelligence to write code to compose music which is in some sense meaningful to human ears. These were generated by a simple Basic program of a few dozen lines:

https://www.pianostreet.com/smf/index.php?topic=18165.0

I don't know about you people but, for me, imitating composers of the past is a pointless exercise by either a human or a computer program. Heuristic algorithms, once they get big enough, start generating surprise and personality of their own, because the meaning of music is imposed by the listening mind no matter what or who created it. Although it was fun, I stopped fiddling with this sort of thing because I want my psyche, soul, consciousness, whatever you like to call it, to be mapped onto abstract piano sound in the spontaneous present. I want to be part of it, both mentally and haptically, and an algorithm cannot do that for me.

It is an interesting subject though, Douglas Hofstadter made some interesting observations about it in his "Godel, Escher, Bach".  





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"It's a caution, grandson !"  -  My grandmother's reaction to almost any issue of the day.
Bob
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« Reply #4 on: August 07, 2017, 08:20:54 AM »

I keep thinking of Band in a Box when I see this thread.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QWNxT8k4fzo


That's been out for 10+ years now.
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Favorite new teacher quote -- "You found the only possible wrong answer."
klavieronin
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« Reply #5 on: August 07, 2017, 10:00:54 AM »

DeepMind's WaveNet has produced some interesting music by generating raw sound waves;

https://deepmind.com/blog/wavenet-generative-model-raw-audio/#block-18
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