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Dudley Moore – Beethoven?

This clip is from the 1950’s-60s British comedy group “Beyond the Fringe. Dudley Moore plays a very funny but also musically ambitious parody of a Beethoven piano sonata based on very odd yet well-known thematic material. Read more >>

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Author Topic: Is Rachmaninoff's Ossia Cadenza the "Original" Version?  (Read 175 times)
roshankakiya123
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« on: October 07, 2017, 12:17:22 PM »

Is Rachmaninoff's ossia cadenza (chordal version) the "original" cadenza? Conversely, is Rachmaninoff's original cadenza (toccata-like version) the "ossia" cadenza?

The chordal version was written before the toccata-like version which means the chordal version must be the original first version. The toccata-like version was written after the chordal version which means the toccata-like version must be the revised second version. Why did Rachmaninoff label the original chordal cadenza as "ossia cadenza" if the toccata-like cadenza is actually the alternative cadenza?
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iansinclair
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« Reply #1 on: October 07, 2017, 08:42:48 PM »

Problem.  What do you mean by original?  Rachmaninoff was both a superb and flamboyant pianist -- and a passably good composer.  It's highly unlikely that he played any cadenza exactly the same way twice...
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Ian
mjames
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« Reply #2 on: October 07, 2017, 10:31:58 PM »

First edition had the ossia cadenza (big chords one), people complained about its difficulty so he revised it to the better known toccata-like version.

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Pianism is my religion, Bach is my God, and Chopin's my prophet.
rachmaninoff_forever
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« Reply #3 on: October 10, 2017, 08:53:03 PM »

First edition had the ossia cadenza (big chords one), people complained about its difficulty so he revised it to the better known toccata-like version.



Actually the tocatta version came around because there wasn't enough time for him to record the whole concerto so he decided to make a shorter cadenza and make a ton of cuts throughout he piece.  

And whoevers complaining about how hard the cadenza is then they need to learn another piece cause there's spots WAY harder than that.

Although I will say by the time you finish the cadenza like 60% of your energy is gone it really depletes you.

And the ossia is the better known candenza cause everyone plays that one.  And rightfully so cause it's a better cadenza lol
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