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April 24, 2018, 04:36:43 PM *
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How to Prepare for a Piano Competition – an Interview with Mariam Batsashvili

Soon after the 10th International Franz Liszt Competition Utrecht, Piano Street’s guest writer Alexander Buskermolen spoke to its most recent winner: the Georgian 21 year old pianist Mariam Batsashvili. The main theme for this interview with the first female winner of this particular competition in The Netherlands: how to prepare for a competition and what happens if you win? Mariam Batsashvili should know. Read more >>

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ca88313
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« on: October 07, 2017, 12:17:22 PM »

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iansinclair
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« Reply #1 on: October 07, 2017, 08:42:48 PM »

Problem.  What do you mean by original?  Rachmaninoff was both a superb and flamboyant pianist -- and a passably good composer.  It's highly unlikely that he played any cadenza exactly the same way twice...
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Ian
mjames
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« Reply #2 on: October 07, 2017, 10:31:58 PM »

First edition had the ossia cadenza (big chords one), people complained about its difficulty so he revised it to the better known toccata-like version.

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GODDAMMIT, CHANGE YOUR SIGNATURE


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Amber Heard is bae.
rachmaninoff_forever
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« Reply #3 on: October 10, 2017, 08:53:03 PM »

First edition had the ossia cadenza (big chords one), people complained about its difficulty so he revised it to the better known toccata-like version.



Actually the tocatta version came around because there wasn't enough time for him to record the whole concerto so he decided to make a shorter cadenza and make a ton of cuts throughout he piece.  

And whoevers complaining about how hard the cadenza is then they need to learn another piece cause there's spots WAY harder than that.

Although I will say by the time you finish the cadenza like 60% of your energy is gone it really depletes you.

And the ossia is the better known candenza cause everyone plays that one.  And rightfully so cause it's a better cadenza lol
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Live large, die large.  Leave a giant coffin.
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