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Liszt: The Grand Sonata

In an article about one of the greatest masterpieces of the 19th century piano literature, Franz Liszt's Sonata in B minor, Patrick Jovell guides us through the history of the work as well as a few of the most common analytical approaches. Listen online to the two recommended performances by Vásáry and Arrau while you follow along in Liszt's autograph manuscript or the printed score available from Piano Street's sheet music library. Read more >>

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ca88313
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« on: October 07, 2017, 12:17:22 PM »

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iansinclair
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« Reply #1 on: October 07, 2017, 08:42:48 PM »

Problem.  What do you mean by original?  Rachmaninoff was both a superb and flamboyant pianist -- and a passably good composer.  It's highly unlikely that he played any cadenza exactly the same way twice...
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Ian
mjames
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« Reply #2 on: October 07, 2017, 10:31:58 PM »

First edition had the ossia cadenza (big chords one), people complained about its difficulty so he revised it to the better known toccata-like version.

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Composing/improvising

Chopin's 4th ballade and 3rd sonata.
Scriabin Op. 42 no. 1, 2, and 3.
Bach Partita No.4
rachmaninoff_forever
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« Reply #3 on: October 10, 2017, 08:53:03 PM »

First edition had the ossia cadenza (big chords one), people complained about its difficulty so he revised it to the better known toccata-like version.



Actually the tocatta version came around because there wasn't enough time for him to record the whole concerto so he decided to make a shorter cadenza and make a ton of cuts throughout he piece.  

And whoevers complaining about how hard the cadenza is then they need to learn another piece cause there's spots WAY harder than that.

Although I will say by the time you finish the cadenza like 60% of your energy is gone it really depletes you.

And the ossia is the better known candenza cause everyone plays that one.  And rightfully so cause it's a better cadenza lol
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