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New Piano Design for the Future

It's futuristic, to be sure, but the newest piano design from Gergely Bogányi has several components that hark back to the 19th century. Read more >>

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Author Topic: black and female composers  (Read 363 times)
rachmaninoff_forever
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« on: October 20, 2017, 03:40:18 AM »

So far I ACTUALLY only know the music of Florence Price and Margaret Bonds

I'm tryna play more music from black people and women so hook me up?
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mjames
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« Reply #1 on: October 20, 2017, 03:50:45 AM »

meh, can't think of any worthwhile black composers for classical piano
the good sh*t's in blues and jazz.
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rachmaninoff_forever
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« Reply #2 on: October 20, 2017, 04:00:17 AM »

meh, can't think of any worthwhile black composers for classical piano
the good sh*t's in blues and jazz.


Recently I did a concert with a Hailstork piece for wind ensemble and gospel piano solo it was pretty kickass

George Walker I don't like a lot.  Florence Price I think is better than Margaret bonds but they're both good.
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klavieronin
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« Reply #3 on: October 20, 2017, 04:27:47 AM »

William Grant Still

http://www.williamgrantstillmusic.com/WorksforKeyboard.htm
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mjames
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« Reply #4 on: October 20, 2017, 04:51:50 AM »

oh yeah i forget, you like tchk....our tastes our totally different. Checked a few works from the mentioned composers and they were pretty boring...



Check out how Oscar messes with it:

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dogperson
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« Reply #5 on: October 20, 2017, 05:45:02 AM »

 I would second the recommendation for William Grant still 

I female romantic composer that I admire is Mel Bonis.   Since she has composed over 300 works, I'm sure you can find something that you like
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Ds5jNk670pY
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indianajo
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« Reply #6 on: October 20, 2017, 01:05:12 PM »

Black and female,  Mary Lou Williams
PBS World runs a documentary occasionally about Mary Lou Williams. I like her earlier work better than her later religious works. 
Black male, Scott Joplin, Fats Waller, Billie Strayhorn, Duke Ellington.    I play some of these.
Female white, Amy Cheney Beach, Clara Schumann, Jennifer Thomas https://soundcloud.com/jennifer-thomas/jennifer-thomas-winter-symphony ,
Watch WFMT playlist for good solo piano pieces by the first two white females.  I think Amy Beach composed a Toccata & Fugue I found interesting on the radio last summer, or some other JS Bach knock off.  Jennifer Thomas I found on soundcloud, and liked the Towers piece too.  
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mjames
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« Reply #7 on: October 20, 2017, 06:49:29 PM »

Clara Schumann and Fanny Mendelssohn are the only convincing 19th century female piano-composers for me, it's such a shame family and societal pressures hampered their development. All the prolific ones tend to be very boring (Amy Beach and Chaminade). Maybe I'm just listening to the wrong pieces?

And DOUBLE yes to Duke Ellington!
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visitor
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« Reply #8 on: October 20, 2017, 09:13:26 PM »

this is a welcome topic, glad others suggested Still as I usually look for any chance to throw his name in the ole hat.
Clara Schumann and Fanny Mendelssohn are the only convincing 19th century female piano-composers for me, it's such a shame family and societal pressures hampered their development. All the prolific ones tend to be very boring (Amy Beach and Chaminade). Maybe I'm just listening to the wrong pieces?

And DOUBLE yes to Duke Ellington!
see my post below a couple replies, i think you'd like Marie Jaell ....
ok, let's see, de Montgeroult. how bow dah?
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visitor
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« Reply #9 on: October 20, 2017, 09:15:59 PM »


Agathe Backer-Grřndahl "Études de Concert en sol mineur", Op.11-3 @ 2:35
 Cool
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visitor
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« Reply #10 on: October 20, 2017, 09:17:18 PM »

Marie Jaell, super jiggy, a lot of great music, the piano concerto omg super cool, solo music is groovy as well.
ie
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« Reply #11 on: October 20, 2017, 09:22:58 PM »

a fav of good ol thalbergmag,

Leopoldine Blahetka: Polonaise op. 19
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visitor
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« Reply #12 on: October 20, 2017, 09:34:27 PM »


Joseph Boulogne  - "Chevalier de Saint-Georges"


fyi
 born on Christmas Day, 1745. He was an African French classical music conductor, composer, musician, and military officer.

Boulogne was born on the West Indies island of Guadeloupe, where his mother Nanon was a slave. Boulogne’s father was a Frenchman, George de Bologne Saint-Georges. He owned the plantation on which Joseph spent his early childhood. The word "Chevalier" means "Knight" in French. It was a title of nobility in the Kingdom of France. Joseph could not inherit his father's status as a member of the nobility because his mother was an African.

Even so, he was called "Chevalier de Saint-Georges" from a young age. At age 10, Saint-Georges moved to France with his parents. There he continued his studies in classical music. He was tutored in violin by Jean-Marie Leclair, and studied composition with Francois-Joseph Gossec. Saint-Georges also spent six years at the boarding school of Texier de La Boessiere, a master of arms. Athletics and fencing brought him a reputation at an early age. He swam across the River Seine in winter with one arm tied behind his back. As an adult he signed his surname "Saint-George" and that became the normal spelling in French. Saint-George's' military career began in 1761 as an officer in the King's Guard.

In his music career, the conductor of the prestigious Le Concert des Amateurs orchestra chose Saint-Georges as First Violin in 1769. Saint-Georges made his public debut as a violin soloist during the 1772-73 concert season, performing his own violin concertos. Many say that Saint-Georges demonstrated the influence of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. He has even been called "Le Mozart Noir" or "The Black Mozart." History shows that Mozart came to Paris in 1778 to study the ”Paris School" of composition while Saint-Georges was a member.

In 1775, Queen Marie-Antoniette appointed Saint-Georges as her music director, and King Louis XVI named him director of the Paris Opera. Saint-Georges was also the first person of African descent to join a Masonic Lodge in France. He was initiated in Paris to "Les 9 Soeurs," a Lodge belonging to the Grand Orient of France.

As a conductor, he later traveled to Vienna and commissioned Franz Joseph Haydn to compose the Paris Symphonies, Nos. 82-87, which premiered in 1787. No. 85, called The Queen, was a favorite of Marie-Antoniette.

Saint-Georges joined the pro-Revolution National Guard in 1789. That same year the Declaration of the Rights of Man was issued by the National Assembly. On Sept. 7, 1792, a delegation of men of color asked the National Assembly to allow them to fight in defense of the Revolution and its egalitarian ideals. On the next day the Assembly, authorized the Légion des Hussards Américains [Legion of American Soldiers], which had 1,000 volunteers of color, with Saint-Georges as their colonel. One of its squadron leaders was Alexandre Dumas Davy de La Pailleterie (1762-1806). Like his colonel, he was the son of a French aristocrat and an African slave. He later had a son, Alexander Dumas, who wrote “The Three Musketeers.”

On September 25, 1793, Saint-Georges lost his command due to false charges of misusing public funds. He spent 18 months in the house of detention at Houdainville before being acquitted. After his release Saint-Georges took part in the Haitian Revolution.

Saint-Georges produced 14 violin concertos and 9 symphonies between 1773 and 1785. He wrote 2 solo violins, 2 symphonies, 3 sonatas for violin and harpsichord, and 18 string quartets divided into 3 collections of 6 quartets in each. Saint-Georges also composed several operas for the Comedie-Italienne, beginning in 1777.

Saint-Georges lived alone in a small apartment in Paris during the final two years of his life. He died of gangrene in a leg wound on June 12, 1799.
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mjames
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« Reply #13 on: October 20, 2017, 10:16:23 PM »

Marie Jael is very nice, exciting and violent. Like that stuff.
Heard of Saint George, but mostly of his violin concertos...didn't know he wrote for the keyboard.
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klavieronin
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« Reply #14 on: October 21, 2017, 12:19:15 AM »

Dulcie Holland

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huaidongxi
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« Reply #15 on: October 21, 2017, 12:45:47 AM »

Thelonious Sphere Monk.  between him , Ellington, Strayhorn, there's enough for a lifetime of piano study (which is my eventual goal, with addition of Coltrane, Bach, Beethoven, Schubert).
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nw746
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« Reply #16 on: October 21, 2017, 05:22:40 AM »

I actually can't think of a lot of black composers I'm into (at the moment anyway), but among female composers there are a lot: Elisabeth Jacquet de la Guerre, Barbara Strozzi, Galina Ustvolskaya, Liza Lim, Rebecca Saunders, Ruth Crawford-Seeger, Rebecca Clarke, Chaya Czernowin, Helena Tulve, Grażyna Bacewicz, Pauline Oliveros, Ellen Fullman, Gloria Coates, Kate Soper, Meredith Monk, Onutė Narbutaitė, Unsuk Chin, Bunita Marcus, to put some names out there. It seems like among classical composers women mostly gain a foothold on the avant-garde/experimental/fringe end of the spectrum which I think also may have something to do with the way existing power structures seem to either keep women out of the mainstream, or be so male-dominated that women trying to enter the mainstream feel uncomfortable and lack encouragement.

Also obviously there are very few female composers from before the 20th century because it was generally expected that their compositional activities would cease when they got married. e.g. Clara Schumann's music mostly dates from before she was 21, and what came after (mostly following her husband's death) isn't really at the same level of quality either tbh. But if you looked only at the music written by Clara before age 21 and compared it to only the music written by Robert before age 21 it would be very difficult to tell which one would become a major composer and I suspect most people would get it wrong (nothing Robert wrote before 1832 comes anywhere near the level of the Notturno from the Soirées musicales lol)
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rachmaninoff_forever
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« Reply #17 on: October 22, 2017, 06:10:11 PM »


Joseph Boulogne  - "Chevalier de Saint-Georges"


fyi
 born on Christmas Day, 1745. He was an African French classical music conductor, composer, musician, and military officer.

Boulogne was born on the West Indies island of Guadeloupe, where his mother Nanon was a slave. Boulogne’s father was a Frenchman, George de Bologne Saint-Georges. He owned the plantation on which Joseph spent his early childhood. The word "Chevalier" means "Knight" in French. It was a title of nobility in the Kingdom of France. Joseph could not inherit his father's status as a member of the nobility because his mother was an African.

Even so, he was called "Chevalier de Saint-Georges" from a young age. At age 10, Saint-Georges moved to France with his parents. There he continued his studies in classical music. He was tutored in violin by Jean-Marie Leclair, and studied composition with Francois-Joseph Gossec. Saint-Georges also spent six years at the boarding school of Texier de La Boessiere, a master of arms. Athletics and fencing brought him a reputation at an early age. He swam across the River Seine in winter with one arm tied behind his back. As an adult he signed his surname "Saint-George" and that became the normal spelling in French. Saint-George's' military career began in 1761 as an officer in the King's Guard.

In his music career, the conductor of the prestigious Le Concert des Amateurs orchestra chose Saint-Georges as First Violin in 1769. Saint-Georges made his public debut as a violin soloist during the 1772-73 concert season, performing his own violin concertos. Many say that Saint-Georges demonstrated the influence of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. He has even been called "Le Mozart Noir" or "The Black Mozart." History shows that Mozart came to Paris in 1778 to study the ”Paris School" of composition while Saint-Georges was a member.

In 1775, Queen Marie-Antoniette appointed Saint-Georges as her music director, and King Louis XVI named him director of the Paris Opera. Saint-Georges was also the first person of African descent to join a Masonic Lodge in France. He was initiated in Paris to "Les 9 Soeurs," a Lodge belonging to the Grand Orient of France.

As a conductor, he later traveled to Vienna and commissioned Franz Joseph Haydn to compose the Paris Symphonies, Nos. 82-87, which premiered in 1787. No. 85, called The Queen, was a favorite of Marie-Antoniette.

Saint-Georges joined the pro-Revolution National Guard in 1789. That same year the Declaration of the Rights of Man was issued by the National Assembly. On Sept. 7, 1792, a delegation of men of color asked the National Assembly to allow them to fight in defense of the Revolution and its egalitarian ideals. On the next day the Assembly, authorized the Légion des Hussards Américains [Legion of American Soldiers], which had 1,000 volunteers of color, with Saint-Georges as their colonel. One of its squadron leaders was Alexandre Dumas Davy de La Pailleterie (1762-1806). Like his colonel, he was the son of a French aristocrat and an African slave. He later had a son, Alexander Dumas, who wrote “The Three Musketeers.”

On September 25, 1793, Saint-Georges lost his command due to false charges of misusing public funds. He spent 18 months in the house of detention at Houdainville before being acquitted. After his release Saint-Georges took part in the Haitian Revolution.

Saint-Georges produced 14 violin concertos and 9 symphonies between 1773 and 1785. He wrote 2 solo violins, 2 symphonies, 3 sonatas for violin and harpsichord, and 18 string quartets divided into 3 collections of 6 quartets in each. Saint-Georges also composed several operas for the Comedie-Italienne, beginning in 1777.

Saint-Georges lived alone in a small apartment in Paris during the final two years of his life. He died of gangrene in a leg wound on June 12, 1799.

This dudes the GOAT
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chopinlover01
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« Reply #18 on: October 23, 2017, 03:53:47 PM »

meh, can't think of any worthwhile black composers for classical piano
the good sh*t's in blues and jazz.


^
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rosejaune177
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« Reply #19 on: October 26, 2017, 06:51:28 PM »

Don't forget Nadia and Lili Boulanger!  Cheesy

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=foK8SyPqH54
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