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The Art Of Piano: Great Pianists Of The 20th Century

This video documentary provides a survey of 18 extraordinary keyboard artists that dominated the concert world in the mid 20th century, from Ignaz Paderewski to Claudio Arrau. The program effectively blends archival film with video clips, concert footage and rare artist interviews. Featured performers are Vladimir Horowitz, Artur Rubinstein, Sviatoslav Richter, Sergei Rachmaninov, Glenn Gould, Edwin Fischer, Claudio Arrau, Georges Cziffra, Wilhelm Backhaus, Alfred Cortot, Ignacy Jan Paderewski and Francis Plante performing live and on film. Read more >>

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Question: What's next, fillng in gaps
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pianodc
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« on: October 23, 2017, 08:51:38 PM »

Hello All,

It's time to hunker down on solid technique improving etudes. Please help with constructive ideas.

I've played most of the English Suites, a bit of the Partitas, quite a few Beethoven, last was Appassionata. I've played almost all of Pictures at an Exhibition. I learned Revolutionary Etude and Heroic Polonaise. I did a few Rach preludes in college. Several Mozart sonata including the fantasia sonata.

This summer I revisited Hanon, Then revisited Czerny. I did the Czerny Octave Studies. Now I'm onto Moszkowski Opus 91. I'm thinking of more Moskowski to fill in gaps, first Op. 97 then Op. 71.

What are next virtuoso type studies to progress me in the direction of Lizst trancriptions and Rachmaninoff? I need some building blocks toward Chopin etudes, or do I?
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chopinawesome
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« Reply #1 on: October 24, 2017, 01:18:32 AM »

Honestly, if you can play Pictures at an Exhibition and Heroic Polonaise, Liszt's Concert waltz on 2 themes, Rachmaninoff's Liebesleid/Liebesfreud, and some Chopin etudes wouldn't be too hard.
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Schumann Kreisleriana Op.16
Scriabin Sonata No.4 Op.30
Rach Op.42
Prok Toccata
Future:
-Resume Ravel Concerto G
-Bach BWV 831
-Chopin Concerti 1 and 2
-Maybe Beethoven waldstein
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« Reply #2 on: October 24, 2017, 06:56:03 PM »

Brahms 51 exercises. is is piano 'daily bread'.

parts ii-v can be linked to from yt launch page.
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google translated overview
Review article | Noriko Saitoh
Review article August 2007 Author: Noriko Saitoh
 It was made between 1865 and 1890, and was published in 1893 in the later years of Brahms. Some such as 1a, etc. are assigned lower numbers by alphabet. Each practice song, except for some practice songs, is written in a way that generally starts with some key tones and rises and falls while repeating its initial form. Also, they are instructed to practice in tones other than the notation being written.
 
 The first exercise is from a to f, and it has a distributed chord in which the left and right hands run counter to. Start with the main chord in D major, and after rising, practice iterating at the beginning by folding back down. It can be said that Brahms seems that the sound values ​​of the left and right hands are not necessarily the same.
 The second exercise consists of a and b. Both are mainly composed of 3 degrees, a rises while alternately playing the upper notes by the sixteenth notes alternately, and descending while alternately playing the descending scales alternately on the left and right after folding back. Start with the main chord of A major. In b, the tone value is triplets with eighth notes. The 3rd exercise is followed mainly by the 2nd exercise, with 3 times as the main body. Here, we play simultaneously on the left and right simultaneously. The sound shape that draws a V character in one measure begins with E major and then rises and then turns down and descends while playing the same shape.
 The fourth exercise is a practice of a descent 6 degree variance of descent by left and right parallel progress. Both hands are instructed to hold the first sound.
 The fifth exercise is written in C major. It is practice of distributed octave by left and right parallel progression. There is also 5a. Brahms seems to be a method of moving the octave itself in octave. Sixth exercise has developed the fifth exercise and is also written in C minor. In practice of playing distributed chords in distributed octave, there is 6 a like the fifth exercise.
 The seventh practice is a practice of playing the inside of a narrow pitch by the left and right unisons richly in the chromatic scale. Such a sound form can be seen only in one of the left and right hands, while the other hand has a long note value 7a.
 The eighth exercise consists of a and b, and b is a development of a. Play a note like Unison that draws analogue symbols of mathematics in one measure with left and right Unison.
 The ninth exercise also consists of a and b. It is a practice of playing dispersed chords with intermittent preserving sounds between each sound by countering the left and right hands. In the tenth practice, while holding the conservation sound actually, play the inside of the octave with a distributed chord. It depends on left and right anti-row form. The eleventh exercise consists of a and b, which further developed ninth and tenth exercises. Here, an additional sound is added.
 Occasionally from the twelfth practice, speed notation can be seen. Here, it is instructed as "moderato" and is accompanied by the word Ben Legato. While practicing chords, it is a practice to play decorations attached to any of the sounds. The thirteenth practice has developed the twelfth practice. The twelfth practice started with the major chord of C major, but the thirteenth practice starts with the main chord of C major.
 The 14th exercise is directed as "Vivace". It is a practice to play the range that exceeds one octave with the other fingers while holding the two notes on the right and left with half notes.
 The 15th exercise is directed as "REGGERO". It is the sixth notes' sixteenth notes with sixteenth notes, and it produces a sound form that draws similar symbols of mathematics, while the left and right are counterclockwise. The sixteenth exercise has been the development of the fifteenth practice, and it is from a to c. Here, the sound to be held by all notes or half notes is added.
 The 17th exercise is a practice of assigning one triplet of sixteenth notes to one eighth note for one eighth note played by three hands, and one sixteenth note to the other. Both hands are repetition of two adjacent notes, which is a notated trill. In the first half and the second half, the sound value carried is changed.
 Eighteenth exercise consists of a and b. "Ben Legato" has been ordered. Each of the left and right hands is a voice part with sixteenth notes mainly composed of two pitches to be played out dispersedly and two voices of a voice part by a triplet of eighth notes mainly composed mainly of three degrees to be played dispersed Play the part.
 The 19th exercise is indicated as "moderato". Divide the chord into multiple notes and play. At that time, the intervals of the left and right hands are alternating, so that the constituent sound always resonates.
 The twentieth practice is a practice of reciprocating over two bars while meandering the distributed chord over the wide range. Then repeat this form up by a semitone increment.
 The twenty-first practice consists of a and b. Due to left and right counteraction, it is a practice to play the chord of the range exceeding 1 octave dispersedly while sandwiching the beat at the beat.
 The 22nd exercise is a practice where one hand plays a scale with a long note value and a shorter note value including an embroidery sound and the other hand plays the scale with the embroidery sound by three degrees.
 The 23rd exercise is from a to c. Playing the scale with violent sounds played at 3 degrees by anti-row left and right. At that time, sound to hold with a long note value is attached. The twenty-fourth exercise consists of a and b, which has evolved the twenty-third practice. There is an instruction of "Ben Legato". It is an exercise that plays embroidery sounds on 3rd downward or upward voice like turning.
 The 25th exercise is from a to c. It is indicated as "non-Troopo ˇ allegro". This exercise is written in a complicated writing method as seen in actual works rather than simply repeating a sound form. Also, "f legato" has been ordered. A constant rhythm pattern is alternately played on the left and right with a time difference. Such a technique is common in Brahms' piano work.
 The 26th exercise also has a to c. It is written "Leguero" and it plays a unique sound form as seen in Brahms' piano work while the left and right hand go against it. The twenty-seventh practice has developed 26th exercise. In the sound form, sounds of same sound are included, and the sound to be retained is added. In the twenty-eighth exercise, we will further develop the two preceding exercises. However, here it is "legato" rather than "reggaro". While holding one note at a time in one measure, the left and right hands play against the semitone-rich sound form.
 In the 29th exercise, we play an octave in which the left and right hands go counter to each other in "presto". At the beginning there is also an instruction of "Réggero", and near the end of this practice, it becomes "Piu Presto" further.
 The thirtieth exercise is similar to the twenty-fourth exercise. While playing the sound form in which both the left and right hands counteract in the inner voice, play the trill which is notated as an outer voice. Slur is attached to every voice part, "Legato" is sought.
 The 31st exercise consists of a and b. It is mainly composed of a triplet tone that plays a chord sequentially from single tone to double tone to heavy tone. The left and right hands play in parallel. b starts with an attractor whose right hand precedes an eighth note of a triplet.
 The 32nd exercise also consists of a and b. a plays a unison by the left and right hands of Legato in an external voice and plays a dispersed chord in which the left and right hands reverse to the inner voice. In b, this outer voice and inner voice are swapped.
 The 33rd exercise also consists of a and b. Left and right hands are legatoes, playing a sound form consisting of a single note and a double note. Where a and b are exchanged between parallel progression and inverse phonation, the same as the previous 32 th practice.
 The 34th exercise is from a to c, and it is indicated as "Ben Legato". Both have unison with left and right hands in the outer voice or inner voice, and in the other voice part play the finer sound form of Unison by the left and right hands as well.
 In the 35th exercise, both external and internal voices produce opposite sound form by the left and right hands. Here, at the time of performance, it is characteristic that the notes of the notified external voice dive under the internal sound every other beat. Although not subordinate numbers are attached, they are instructed to practice with "legato" and "reggaro".
In the 36th exercise, the other holding sound which is suppressed in the second half of each measure is added to the practice of playing the left and right opposite sound form with "Legato" while holding the sound one by one in one measure.
 The 37th exercise consists of a and b. Repeat only in one direction expanding the dispersed chords over the wide range where the left and right hands go counter to each beat. Strictly speaking, a is a quarter-beat followed by a sixteenth note ahead, b is an eighth quarter beat and is divided into five eighth notes and four groups, so the beat breaks and the variance chord The delimiters do not match. In addition, "ben legato pew forte" becomes "b" for "Dolce Legato" of a.
 The 38th exercise is "Allegro Ben Marcato f", embroidery sound is added to the upper or lower voice of chords by the left and right unison, and the voice part of the embroidery sound is replaced every beat. The 39th exercise is a chord by Unison which is left and right, where embroidery sound is added to the lower voice. Moreover, it is indicated as "Ben Legato".
 The 40th exercise consists of a and b. Play a single note of a sixteenth note to which the left and right hands run counter to "f legato", then play "p reggio". In b, by holding a part of the sound of a single tone, it becomes partially polyphonic. The 41st practice and the 42nd exercise are the development of the 40th exercise and consist of a and b.
 The 43rd exercise consists of a and b. Unison that is characterized by chromatic progression by the left and right hands plays a harmonic sound that jumps while the left and right hands go counter to the sound held by one note per measure in the center. Practice at "Andante" and "Allegro" is required.
 The 44th exercise also consists of a and b. a is a distributed chord by parallel progression in the left and right, and b is practice of a dispersed chord by anti-row.
 The 45th exercise is a practice of playing the first sound of 3 degrees of dispersion in front of it by holding the sound in the upper voice by the left and right Unison in "Ben Marquardt". Two kinds of key signatures are prepared.
 The 46th exercise consists of a and b. "a" is "Dolce", with the left and right hands playing in parallel with each other, with the sounds held by the left and right hands by five bars playing, they play a supernatural sound. On the other hand, b plays the sound form over the high range, centering on the sound held by the left and right hands in five bars in "Dolce Rogero" as well.
 The 47th exercise is "Allegro", one hand plays the waveform of "Ben Legato", and the other hand plays a sound form forming a unison with a rest resting place in "Reggello" .
 In the 48th exercise, while the left and right hands progress in parallel, the upper voice and the inner voice are shifted one beat at a time, and a sound form is formed which makes counter-lines. The 49th exercise consists of a and b, and it is a development of the 48th exercise.
 In the fifteenth exercise, the waveform sound form due to the left and right counteractions played in "Legero" in the first measure is played with "Ben Legato" with the outer voice by counteraction also from the second measure.
 In the 51st exercise that concludes this practice song collection, "Vivace Leggiero" plays the sound form of the opposite left and right monophones.

 In 1893 when this practice song collection was published, all the Brahms piano works are complete, so these practice songs can be said to be practice songs by Brahms for Brahms piano work. In fact, in these practice songs, you can see renditions (especially in octaves) that use the poly rhythms characteristic of Brahms' piano work and the wrinkles of the wrists. Also, the sound form played by the left and right hands going counter to is characteristic. Incidentally, there is an interesting writing by a female pianist, Accent felt, about this practice song collection.
■ References: Johannes Brahms "51 Ubungen fur Klavier WoO 6" Breitkopf & Hartel
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klavieronin
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« Reply #3 on: October 24, 2017, 09:08:32 PM »

If I were you I'd be looking at the Debussy etudes or York Bowen's 24 Preludes. Kapustin wrote a great set of 8 concert studies, Op.40, but I don't know if that's what you are looking for. If you wanted something to really push you maybe Szymanowsky's 12 etudes, Op.33. Or, since you've started on them already with the Revolutionary etude, and since that seems to be your goal, why just make a start on the rest of the Chopin etudes?

If we're talking technical exercises in the pure sense then Rafael Joseffy's School of Advanced Piano Playing would be my recommendation but it is a bit of a monster if you plan to do the whole thing. Czerny's 40 Daily exercises Op.337 are also quite good.
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