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November 24, 2017, 09:06:10 AM *
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Dudley Moore – Beethoven?

This clip is from the 1950’s-60s British comedy group “Beyond the Fringe. Dudley Moore plays a very funny but also musically ambitious parody of a Beethoven piano sonata based on very odd yet well-known thematic material. Read more >>

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Author Topic: How do you stay awake?  (Read 229 times)
Bob
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« on: November 21, 2017, 12:08:27 AM »

Not necessarily performance, but this seems like the best board for it.  It would apply to listening or practicing. 

When the music lulls your brain off, how do you stay focused?

I'd say, "Get more sleep, maybe exercise a little so you're more alert," but it's not that.

When the music is hypnotic, then what do you do to remain alert?


Or do you not stay alert, but stay functional somehow?  Do you stay in a hypno-state where you can still continue to play or listen?
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rachmaninoff_forever
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« Reply #1 on: November 21, 2017, 04:44:02 AM »

Lolz I just fall asleep
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mjames
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« Reply #2 on: November 21, 2017, 04:59:00 AM »

Lolz I just fall asleep

stop listening to rachmaninoff and getting sleepy won't be a problem
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rachmaninoff_forever
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« Reply #3 on: November 21, 2017, 05:53:50 AM »

stop listening to rachmaninoff and getting sleepy won't be a problem

I actually don't listen to classical music a lot
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beethovenfan01
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« Reply #4 on: November 21, 2017, 05:57:17 AM »

If you fall asleep while listening to classical ... Fine, whatever.

If you fall asleep while practicing ... then perhaps you aren't practicing right. When practicing, you should be focused on working out and solving problems in music, not necessarily just playing stuff through.

Although ... it is perfectly acceptable also just play through pieces and enjoy them. Falling asleep is totally fine. Just don't fall off the piano bench!
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Auditioning to U of O school of music:
Bach WTC Bk 1 No. 10
Beethoven Op. 81a (I.)
Rachmaninoff Op. 32 No. 10
Future:
Liszt Wilde Jagd, Dante, HR 6
Chopin Ballade 3
Beethoven Op. 57
Prokofiev
mjames
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« Reply #5 on: November 21, 2017, 06:39:19 AM »

I actually don't listen to classical music a lot

same tbh, it gets a bit repetitive to listen to classical piano. I only do so to find new cool music to add to my "to play in the future" archives, so when I'm not i usually listen to pop and jazz.

(it's just banter btw, I love rachmaninoff..)

OP: I love sleeping, so when i get sleepy I don't fight it.
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rachmaninoff_forever
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« Reply #6 on: November 21, 2017, 06:09:26 PM »

same tbh, it gets a bit repetitive to listen to classical piano. I only do so to find new cool music to add to my "to play in the future" archives, so when I'm not i usually listen to pop and jazz.

(it's just banter btw, I love rachmaninoff..)

OP: I love sleeping, so when i get sleepy I don't fight it.

Yeah I know.  And even if it wasn't banter it still wouldn't bother me

But eww pop?  I listen to weird jazz fusion and jazz fusion of pop covers and trap

And gospel/neo soul
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keypeg
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« Reply #7 on: November 21, 2017, 07:48:46 PM »

I can't picture falling asleep while practising.  That is, sometimes I may have had too many hours of work, where it's pure fatigue.  The simple solution to that is to get some sleep, or in the least, have a short nap and then practice some essential things for shorter time periods, with enough focus and direction that the short periods also yield something.  That in itself is a waker-upper for me, I find.
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louispodesta
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« Reply #8 on: November 22, 2017, 12:04:25 AM »

I can't picture falling asleep while practising.  That is, sometimes I may have had too many hours of work, where it's pure fatigue.  The simple solution to that is to get some sleep, or in the least, have a short nap and then practice some essential things for shorter time periods, with enough focus and direction that the short periods also yield something.  That in itself is a waker-upper for me, I find.
I am currently working on memorizing the Slow Movement of the Rach 2nd, and the second and third movements of the Prokfiev 1st.   In that I am an ASPY with ADHD to boot, this is somewhat of a problem.

My advice to those who experience similar levels of fatigue is:  1)  Stop whenever you are "very" tired.  Then, take some kind of break, a walk, reviewing emails, et al.

2)   Do not practice for more than two hours at a stretch. This was both Hummel's and also Chopin's recommendation.  It works!
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Bob
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« Reply #9 on: November 22, 2017, 12:36:03 AM »

I'm thinking more hypnotized than actually falling asleep, although that's happened.  And then there's being tired enough where things drag and it's really not that productive.
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louispodesta
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« Reply #10 on: November 22, 2017, 11:49:43 PM »

With all of the Post's good intentions, the bottom line is: 1) A fully realized/aware practice session and 2) An on point, specific to detail, productive practice session.

None of this is even possible, if one is even remotely fatigued.  Hey, as a former "Conservatory Method" student, I have been there.  Long hours, coupled with fatigue, accomplishes nothing except eventually getting a particular matriculate to quit, drop out, and never play the piano again.

The point being, this is a very serious topic, per the OP.
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keypeg
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« Reply #11 on: November 23, 2017, 01:54:22 AM »

Bob, how about listening with intent; practising with intent.  It's only hypnotic if you go by the old adage of repeating something 100 times to get into muscle memory, and similar. On track, or off?
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