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Topic: wanting to learn a good piece thats not overplayed??  (Read 2252 times)

Offline musical_fingers

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wanting to learn a good piece thats not overplayed??
on: January 21, 2005, 08:04:39 AM
does anyone know any good pieces that are not overplayed? is anyone familiar with balakirevs scherzo no2? is it overplayed?  ::)
ness :-)

Offline Regulus Medtner

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Re: wanting to learn a good piece thats not overplayed??
Reply #1 on: January 21, 2005, 12:34:33 PM
I can assure you that this piece is really far from being overplayed (or even just being played:-).
I would recommend, though, to investigate some of Medtner's pieces.

Offline Awakening

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Re: wanting to learn a good piece thats not overplayed??
Reply #2 on: January 22, 2005, 07:17:06 PM
does anyone know any good pieces that are not overplayed? is anyone familiar with balakirevs scherzo no2? is it overplayed?  ::)

It really shouldn't matter whether something is overplayed.  Pieces are generally overplayed with good reason--because they're important works that help define a period, help teach a technique, are a joy to listen to, or all of the above.  That being said, if a piece seems appropriate for you, play it.  Furthermore, if you're playing a piece that everyone knows at a recital, you have the added advantage of pleasing the crowd by giving them something familiar.  It shouldn't be about pleasing the crowd, obviously, but the mainstream listeners generally have more appreciation for well-known pieces.  If you're able to play something incredibly famous, and still impress people with it, then you've accomplished a difficult task.  You're expected to play every note perfectly, and because there's a high standard and recognition by the audience, they're going to notice if you screw up.  I'm playing Rondo Alla Turca tomorrow at a recital, and I feel a little guilty about playing something so well-known, almost to the point of being hackneyed, not to mention something which isn't all that technically challenging.  Nevertheless, I'm paying special attention that I really nail this piece, and do things with it that people might not expect.  Though it isn't technically challenging, I realize that there is a lot of nuance within it, and it's important to do everything right in order to not butcher this "over-played" piece.  The same could be said about anything that is wildly popular. 

All this being said, no, that piece you mention isn't over-played at all.  Maybe you'd like to choose something more well-known  ;)

Offline Troldhaugen

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Re: wanting to learn a good piece thats not overplayed??
Reply #3 on: January 23, 2005, 06:30:14 AM
Not many people have Balakirev in their repertoire with a notable exception of Islamey. I've never played his Scherzo No.2 myself before, but Balakirev composed many amazing pieces. I've played his Reverie, and it's got this impressionistic style with a non-western flavor. He's one of my favourite composers. 

Offline Chrysalis

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Re: wanting to learn a good piece thats not overplayed??
Reply #4 on: January 23, 2005, 11:41:14 AM
Debussy - Reverie ? or is that one overplayed a lot too?
Debussy Rox! Debussy Rox! Debussy Rox!

Offline Troldhaugen

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Re: wanting to learn a good piece thats not overplayed??
Reply #5 on: January 23, 2005, 07:14:10 PM
No....Balakirev also composed Reverie. It's one of his late works, truly a masterpiece. It's rarely played these days, though.  :(He composed many great works like Sonata, Nocturne No. 3....etc.

Offline bernhard

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Re: wanting to learn a good piece thats not overplayed??
Reply #6 on: January 23, 2005, 08:17:16 PM
Debussy - Reverie ? or is that one overplayed a lot too?

Yes, I am afraid it is overplayed (and Debussy hated it) :'(

Instead try Ottorino Respighi’s Notturno. Hauntingly beautiful and sounds far more difficult than it actually is. :D

Best wishes,
Bernhard

The music business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs. There's also a negative side. (Hunter Thompson)

Offline dlu

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Re: wanting to learn a good piece thats not overplayed??
Reply #7 on: January 23, 2005, 09:39:25 PM
Anything by Hummel.

Offline Chrysalis

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Re: wanting to learn a good piece thats not overplayed??
Reply #8 on: January 23, 2005, 09:59:12 PM
I really dont get why he hated that piece... i think it is very beautiful..
but who knows, i think he has higher qualifications on music then me..

Debussy Rox! Debussy Rox! Debussy Rox!

Offline Rach3

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Re: wanting to learn a good piece thats not overplayed??
Reply #9 on: January 23, 2005, 10:00:23 PM
Hummel is underplayed, but I've heard even fewer of Clementi's sonatas in performance [than of Hummel]. Extremely underrepsented, very musical composer. I know too many people who think his only achievment was the op. 36 sonatinas.

There are also some Schumann works which are (imho) neglected, [or is it perhaps as a composer he is less popular in the concert circuit?] of which the op. 20 Humoreske is an awesome example.
"Never look at the trombones, it only encourages them."
--Richard Wagner

Offline SteinwayTony

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Re: wanting to learn a good piece thats not overplayed??
Reply #10 on: January 24, 2005, 06:25:18 PM
Hummel is underplayed, but I've heard even fewer of Clementi's sonatas in performance [than of Hummel]. Extremely underrepsented, very musical composer. I know too many people who think his only achievment was the op. 36 sonatinas.

There are also some Schumann works which are (imho) neglected, [or is it perhaps as a composer he is less popular in the concert circuit?] of which the op. 20 Humoreske is an awesome example.

Kreisleriana and Noveletten come to mind.  I know a few people on this forum who have Kreisleriana, either in its entirety or just a few movements.  But this is true, a lot of Schumann's piano music is neglected.

As for the Humoreske I would imagine that nobody wants to sacrifice the time for an ungodly long and difficult piece.  So sad...

Offline rafant

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Re: wanting to learn a good piece thats not overplayed??
Reply #11 on: January 24, 2005, 07:26:41 PM
John Field's 18 Nocturnes. They deserves more attention. Maybe that the inspiration doesn't reach the heights of the best moments of Chopin's, but still it's very pleasing and fabulous music, great for recitals. The more I hear them, the more I like them.

About the overplayed pieces topic, I wasn't feeling guilty myself for having learnt and wanting to learn some of them. But I understand now that it depends of the kind of pianist one is: Public or professional  pianists, I think, have a bigger responsability for offering a varied, not well-worn repertory. On the other hand,  private or amateur pianists have more freedom for playing the most beloved pieces, no matter how overplayed.
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