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Steinway 6' Grand (Read 5622 times)

Offline rmc7777

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Steinway 6' Grand
« on: February 12, 2002, 09:22:18 PM »
Hello,

I am starting to investigate purchasing a used Steinway grand piano for my living room, to be used mostly for practice but also for some entertaining (friends, family, colleagues).  Several people have told me to get a piano that is at least 6' in length.  Does anyone have an opinion on this?  Is the sound or action of a 6' so much better than shorter pianos that it's worth the extra money and space?  My living room can accomodate the larger pianos - not sure about the budget!

thx.

Offline dinosaurtales

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Re: Steinway 6' Grand
«Reply #1 on: February 13, 2002, 08:23:53 AM »
My understanding is that size matters because of the increased number of copper-wound bass strings as the piano gets smaller.  The smaller the piano, the more difficult it is to get a good tone out of the wound strings, which apparently give off what they call inharmocity.  It's the kind of thing that may sound awful to an experience technician who tunes a lot of concert pianos, but I might never notice the difference.  It's just what I've read.   Generally, the rule of thumb is to get the biggest piano you can afford that you can fit into your living room.  
So much music, so little time........

Offline Ckarrlozs

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Re: Steinway 6' Grand
«Reply #2 on: February 13, 2002, 11:04:04 AM »
About the sound: Larger pianos have longer strings. Longer strings need to be more tense to produce the same pitch. More tension equals to richer sound. That is valid not only for the bass strings but for the whole range. The difference is much less noticeable in the treble though.

About the action: Longer pianos have longer keys. The action is basically the same but the distance between the keys and the action itself is somewhat longer. Longer keys add something to the touch as they are heavier. It doesn't necessarily means the touch will feel heavier, but the feeling when pressing down the keys is different. It is like the difference between driving a small car and driving a large car with a powerful engine. Both reach the same speed but the feeling is completely different.

About the quality: Steinway's policy for quality is that every model and size is equal in quality. But you still should try before you buy as two Bs for examble may feel and sound completely different.
The model O is 180 cm in length and is a good compromise between size and sound if on a budget. The model B is 208 cm long and is definitely the best choice if you can afford it but don't want to have a full concert D in your living room! Stay away from the model A (manufactured only in Hamburg) as its sound quality is quite poor compared to the other models.

Hope it helps!

Offline martin_s

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Re: Steinway 6' Grand
«Reply #3 on: February 13, 2002, 12:02:58 PM »
B and D are definately the best Steinway models. D is simply an absolutely superb piano and B's are great instrument too although they sometimes tend to lack a little in tone in the upper middle register. But then again, that is all individual and has got a lot to do with how the piano has been set up, maintained and regulated... They should start to do deals like "Buy any large Steinway piano - get 1 piano technician FREE!! (+cheese & tomato topping)"

Offline Ckarrlozs

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Re: Steinway 6' Grand
«Reply #4 on: February 14, 2002, 12:19:40 AM »
What about: "Buy 2 pay for 1"?

Offline Ckarrlozs

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Re: Steinway 6' Grand
«Reply #5 on: February 14, 2002, 12:20:51 AM »
"Buy a Steinway grand and get a handsfree FOR FREE!" ;D

Offline STS

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Re: Steinway 6' Grand
«Reply #6 on: June 27, 2002, 06:27:18 PM »
The Steinway New York L is a beautiful piano, if properly voiced and regulated.  I would wholeheartedly recommend one.  The bass sounds like a larger piano.  The only complaint I'd have is that the treble is weak and needs lots of lacquer.


Offline Pianorak

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Re: Steinway 6' Grand
«Reply #7 on: July 26, 2002, 03:01:24 PM »
Sorry to revive this old one, but I was intrigued by the following which I came across investigating the Wilhelm Steinberg piano for a friend. Obviously it's of interest only to our American friends:

<<I was also very impressed with the 6'11" Fandrich & Sons grand. I have played many, many Steinway B series grands over the years. (In fact, it has also been 20+ years since I played a really good New York Steinway.) But the Fandrich & Sons grand had it. It had the same kind of singing lyricism as a really good New York Steinway prepped right. I was thrilled. And to think that this piano sells for $26,000! If I had the room in my house for a grand I would have taken the piano home with me right then.>>



Offline dinosaurtales

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Re: Steinway 6' Grand
«Reply #8 on: July 29, 2002, 07:31:17 AM »
So are there any new Fandrich $ Sons being made now?  Or not?  Are there areas of the country they would most likely be found?  I'd love to try one out if i could find one!

So much music, so little time........

Offline Brian Lawson, RPT

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Re: Steinway 6' Grand
«Reply #9 on: July 29, 2002, 08:20:21 PM »
Brian Lawson, RPT
South Africa
http://www.lawsonic.co.za
Piano Tuning and Restorations - world wide

Offline rachfan

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Re: Steinway 6' Grand
«Reply #10 on: January 06, 2003, 03:18:16 AM »
Hi rmc7777--

If you are looking for a 6' Steinway,  in the contemporary market that would be the American Steinway Model L, which is 5' 10".  The other part of your question is does the length of the grand matter?  The answer is an emphatic YES.  To put it simply, the longer the strings, the richer the sound.  To the very serious student or the artist, that is of tremendous importance.  The casual or incidental player, who might be less discerning, is more apt to be satisfied with a small, and even far less expensive, grand.  

Several years ago I had a Steinway Model M (5' 7") and wanted to trade up to a 6' piano to get the richer sound.  Because I'm a serious pianist and prefer American built pianos, I limited my search at the time to Steinway, Baldwin, and Falcone (which is now no longer available). Mason & Hamlin then was on the drawing boards, but not on the market.  The Steinway L has its adherents.  What I don't like about it (aside from the price) is the square back.  While it affords a larger sound board and, therefore, an ample sound, sometimes the sound strikes me as being a bit harsh rather than being rich.  Or as a tuner from a Steinway franchise once confided to me, "The notes of  the L have a few wolves among them."  

The close competitor is the Baldwin L at 6' 3", which has a tapered back making room for longer strings.  In regards to sound quality, I like that solution (and price) better.  You get the richness of the longer strings and a very ample sound as well.  The tapered back is a more natural solution than the compromise of the square back in my opinion.  If there is a Baldwin dealer near you, do check out their Model L.  I think you'll like it.    
Interpreting music means exploring the promise of the potential of possibilities.