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Topic: Good Technique Songs  (Read 1201 times)

Offline c128ash

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Good Technique Songs
on: May 25, 2022, 05:40:43 PM
Hello,
This is my first post so I apologize if something isn't formatted correctly. I played the piano when I was younger, and just got back into it 4 or so months ago. Over that time span I played Bach's minuet in G major, Satie's Gymnopedie no. 1, and finally Chopin Op. 28, No. 4.
With uni out for the summer I don't have a teacher, but was looking for some songs/etudes I could work on by myself to build up my technique, as my end goal (for now) is to get to a level to play the songs in Chopin Op. 9 at some point. I know I'm far off from there, but was hoping to find some good songs to work on to help build up to it over the next few months.
Thank you so much and I appreciate any help/advice.
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Offline lelle

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Re: Good Technique Songs
Reply #1 on: May 25, 2022, 09:18:33 PM
First of all, congratulations on finding your way back to the piano! It can be very rewarding to play and there is always something to learn no matter how good you get.

For some short Etudes to play, you could check out Burgmuller Op 100. They're quite charming pieces and some of them may be approachable, others perhaps a bit challenging. You can also check out Czerny Op. 599 for some simple finger etudes if you want to focus purely on working on your mechanics.

Offline mjames

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Re: Good Technique Songs
Reply #2 on: May 26, 2022, 02:01:25 PM
Hello,
This is my first post so I apologize if something isn't formatted correctly. I played the piano when I was younger, and just got back into it 4 or so months ago. Over that time span I played Bach's minuet in G major, Satie's Gymnopedie no. 1, and finally Chopin Op. 28, No. 4.
With uni out for the summer I don't have a teacher, but was looking for some songs/etudes I could work on by myself to build up my technique, as my end goal (for now) is to get to a level to play the songs in Chopin Op. 9 at some point. I know I'm far off from there, but was hoping to find some good songs to work on to help build up to it over the next few months.
Thank you so much and I appreciate any help/advice.

You don't need dexterity for op. 9 no. 1 and no. 2. Just learn them if that's what you want to play, there's no point in wasting your time trying to playing other pieces to "build up" to these pieces that can be brilliantly played below tempo.

Knowing how to pedal, phrasing musical lines, and understanding how to texturize the color of your playing through articulation to the level required of these nocturnes is another story and only something that can only be obtained through practice and experience. It's technique, but has little to do with dexterity in the way you're thinking of. Don't think you can speedrun it by playing Czerny and Burgmuller or whatever for a few months.

However, if it's just a hobby it doesn't really matter. Just learn the pieces. It's not like you're auditioning for a conservatory.

But if you're serious about playing them well, best way to practice Chopin is by playing him. Play the easier preludes, the mazurkas, and the little waltzes too alongside the nocturnes.

Play a bunch of Bach (inventions/sinfonias) and Mozart to work on your articulation and phrasing.

Don't waste your time on boring composers when you're self-teaching, it'll kill your interest in the instrument. You can hop on the boring exercises when you get a teacher and he assigns all that boring crap to you, then you'll have someone to guide you and actually teach you how to approach those studies the way you're supposed to and in a way that accommodates your physique.

Playing Czerny when you're self taught and have no idea what you're doing is a waste of time. Just play the music you enjoy.

Offline lelle

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Re: Good Technique Songs
Reply #3 on: May 26, 2022, 10:44:37 PM
Playing Czerny when you're self taught and have no idea what you're doing is a waste of time. Just play the music you enjoy.

I think that depends. I certainly know people who enjoy doing the occasional Czerny mini-study. I just wanted to suggest it so OP knows it exists, and if they find it boring, they can skip it. I just think with the listed level of repertoire, Bach inventions and Mozart (sonatas?) might be too big of a leap. That's where easier studies might come in handy. I'd vote for Burgmuller because they're great. But the easiest Czerny pieces can be useful if you enjoy just focusing a bit extra on training your fingers.
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