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A Debussy 100 Tribute

The great French composer Achille-Claude Debussy died 100 years ago, on March 25 in Paris. Debussy is considered one of the fathers of modern music and the most influential of all French composers. From Debussy’s Suite bergamasque, Clair de lune has emerged as the most beloved and appreciated piece of the suite appreciated by pianists on all levels. From the beautiful interiors of Palazzo Chigi in Ariccia, Rome we hear Italian pianist Alessandra Ammara play the piece. Read more >>

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Author Topic: Playing Two Against Three  (Read 2776 times)
dough_mouse
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« on: December 28, 2005, 07:50:13 AM »

Do any of you have any tips for playing two against three, or any differring rhythms against each other?
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Mayla
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« Reply #1 on: December 28, 2005, 09:06:23 AM »

.
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quantum
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« Reply #2 on: December 28, 2005, 12:14:52 PM »

The trick is recognizing the rhythmic pattern of the combined beats. 

Use this phrase "Nice cup of tea".   Say it out loud. 
This is equivalent to:
3/4 time: Quarter note, eighth, eighth, quarter. 

Now RH 3, LH 2.  Beat on your thighs:
Together, R, L, R.  (keep looping the pattern, to the rhythm of the phrase above)

For RH 2, LH 3:
Togeether, L, R, L

....

Now once you get that there is an excercise to further develop your skill on it. 

For the following count OUT LOUD only one pattern: either in 3 or in 2. 

R 3, L 2, count in 3
R 2, L 3, count in 3
R 2, L 3, count in 2
R 3, L 2, count in 2

Play the pattern continuously, without stopping rhythm as you change the variation.  The pattern loops so when you finish the 4th variation, you go back to the 1st one. 

....

For future reference the pattern for 3 against 4:

The rhyme: "Pass the golden butter"
3/4 time: dotted eighth, sixteenth, eighth, eighth, sixteenth, dottend eighth

R 4, L 3:
Together, R, L, R, L, R

R 3, L 4:
Together, L, R, L, R, L


Exercise:

R 4, L 3, count in 3
R 4, L 3, count in 4
R 3, L 4, count in 4
R 3, L 4, count in 3

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fuel925
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« Reply #3 on: December 28, 2005, 03:41:12 PM »

You might find some of the replies in a thread I made useful:

http://www.pianostreet.com/smf/index.php/topic,14810.0.html
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thalbergmad
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« Reply #4 on: December 28, 2005, 05:00:21 PM »

 

Use this phrase "Nice cup of tea".   Say it out loud. 

That is exactly how i was taught.

Felt rather silly doing it at the time, but it works.
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zheer
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« Reply #5 on: December 28, 2005, 05:44:38 PM »

That is exactly how i was taught.

Felt rather silly doing it at the time, but it works.

   Haw can saying nice cups of tea , be of any help. Please dont explain.
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dough_mouse
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« Reply #6 on: December 28, 2005, 06:53:21 PM »

Ok, thanks a bunch. That "nice cup of tea" thing works pretty well actually.
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quantum
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« Reply #7 on: December 28, 2005, 07:21:44 PM »


   Haw can saying nice cups of tea , be of any help. Please dont explain.

Ok, I'll just elaborate then  Roll Eyes


When we talk we speak in rhythm, although we don't usually notice it.  Try saying any moderately long sentence where all syllables of all words are evenly spaced.  You sure will notice something sounds wrong when doing that. 

Shakeaspere considedered rhythm an important part when writing many of his works.  That's why somtimes they sound like they work like phrases in music. 

Anyways, we have all learned aurally the rhythms of natural speach and we use it every day.  It is this familiarity with speach rhythms that is used to aid learning of polyrhythms.  We would have to make a strong concious effort to speak out of rhythm. 

Similarly, we would have to make a strong concious decision to walk unevenly (presuming we have no physical imparements).  Walking is our own built in metronome, and when a student cannot keep an even rhythm pattern just ask them to clap while walking around the room.  This may fix the problem quite quickly. 
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Made a Liszt. Need new Handel's for Soler panel & Alkan foil. Will Faure Stein on the way to pick up Mendels' sohn. Josquin get Wolfgangs Schu with Clara. Gone Chopin, I'll be Bach
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« Reply #8 on: December 28, 2005, 07:44:17 PM »

Thanks quantum, i see what you mean, and the first thing that came to my mind was rap music.
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