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Topic: Debussy, La Cathedrale Engloutie (Preludes, Book I)  (Read 12156 times)

Offline rachfan

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I actually studied this prelude twice, once as a teenager, then later in life--and did some things differently the second time around (this recording).

Update: I deleted the CD cut (49 downloads) and replaced it with the source tape recording which has better fidelity. 

Comments welcome.
Interpreting music means exploring the promise of the potential of possibilities.

Offline troglodyte

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Re: Debussy, La Cathedrale Engloutie (Preludes, Book I)
Reply #1 on: July 05, 2006, 03:57:17 PM
Well done! Great dynamic contrast and the piece is well kept together. My only complaint would be that a little more rhythmic stability might be called for. For example the slight ritardando before the first fortissimo section breaks the spell of this being churchbells sounding - no way churchbells can make any kind of rubato - but overall very good!

Offline rachfan

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Re: Debussy, La Cathedrale Engloutie (Preludes, Book I)
Reply #2 on: July 06, 2006, 01:13:10 AM
Hi Troglodyte,

Thanks very much for your nice comments on my recording of this prelude.  On your point on the ritardando, actually what I was doing there was allargando limited only to the last two left hand octaves of section A just prior to the entrance of the A2 motif.  But your point is well taken, and I've put a notation in the score.

Actually, on rhythmic stability, what I thought you were going to bag me on are the quiet transition measures immediately following section A2.  I did take a bit more time there than technically allowed by the tempo.  The reason is that I elected to use the "silent retaking of chords", a form of finger pedaling, that Gieseking also employed in that same place...  but I was not quite as adept as he was, ha-ha!  It's probably not too noticeable though. 

Again, thanks for commenting.

David

Interpreting music means exploring the promise of the potential of possibilities.
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