Piano Forum



A Sudden Chat with Paul Lewis about Beethoven & Schubert
Substituting for the suddenly indisposed Janine Jensen, pianist Paul Lewis shares his ideas on his global Schubert project, classical repertoire focus and views on titans Beethoven vs. Schubert. Read more >>

Topic: Mozart's Twinkle Variations  (Read 2254 times)

Offline Karin

  • PS Silver Member
  • Newbie
  • ***
  • Posts: 13
Mozart's Twinkle Variations
on: April 01, 2002, 08:03:58 PM
Hello

I'm looking for informationn on this piece.  Was is written as an exercise?  

What does the French title mean?

Should I follow the new fingers from the music I obtained from the web?  I'd played it before and the notes in the 1st variation were tied over the bar, here they repeat.

Thank you,
Karin
Sign up for a Piano Street membership to download this piano score.
Sign up for FREE! >>

Offline ludwig

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 293
Re: Mozart's Twinkle Variations
Reply #1 on: April 28, 2002, 04:51:08 AM

Ah! Vous dirai-je, Maman is the French title which basically means say Ah! You I say, Mom...(ehe) doesn't make much sense, it is actually about the child wanting bonbons (candy).


It was a variation wrote to neatly present mozart's ideas of different techniques. Not sure if it was written to be a study of some sort. I say get a trustworthy score of the variation for fingering, it isn't an easy piece to play well, should be pretty exciting if played well. :) goodluck.
"Classical music snobs are some of the snobbiest snobs of all. Often their snobbery masquerades as helpfulnes... unaware that they are making you feel small in order to make themselves feel big..."ÜÜÜ

Offline hoffmanntales

  • PS Silver Member
  • Newbie
  • ***
  • Posts: 13
Re: Mozart's Twinkle Variations
Reply #2 on: May 10, 2002, 01:12:16 PM
I'm also studying this piece. Could anybody suggest the  most suitable order to study the variations from the easiest to the hardest to play?

Thanks,
hoffmanntales

Offline nilsjohan

  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1613
Re: Mozart's Twinkle Variations
Reply #3 on: May 11, 2002, 04:27:32 PM
Why not start with the more difficult variations? You will obviously need more time to master them technically.

Offline princessdecadence

  • PS Silver Member
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 190
Re: Mozart's Twinkle Variations
Reply #4 on: November 07, 2005, 10:28:07 AM

What does the French title mean?

Should I follow the new fingers from the music I obtained from the web?  I'd played it before and the notes in the 1st variation were tied over the bar, here they repeat.

Thank you,
Karin

"Ah! vous dirais-je, maman" means "Oh mum I'll tell you" or "Oh I would tell you mum"

Here's the cute lyrics en francais:

    Ah! vous dirais-je, Maman,
    Ce qui cause mon tourment
    Papa veut que je raisonne,
    Comme une grande personne.
    Moi je dis que les bonbons
    Valent mieux que la raison

Means..."Mum I would tell you, what causes my tormet, Daddy wants me to reason like an adult. I say candy is better/best/worth more than reason" Something like that anyway.  Absolutely cute!

And no you don't have to follow the fingering suggested but usually it's better to.  Fingering that are printed on the sheet should act only as a guide rather than a rule to follow since everyone's hands are different.  Whichever suits you best.

I love variation 3,7 and 11! So very much!

xx
~ ~

Offline apion

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 757
Re: Mozart's Twinkle Variations
Reply #5 on: November 07, 2005, 11:58:20 AM
Why not start with the more difficult variations? You will obviously need more time to master them technically.

Most logical, nilsjohan.

Offline thaicheow

  • PS Silver Member
  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 114
Re: Mozart's Twinkle Variations
Reply #6 on: March 30, 2006, 04:30:41 PM
Good try.

I have spent year in perfecting this piece, and still finding a lot of fun doing it.

Practise slowly, and try to enjoy every notes. It is said that Mozart actually composed for his student as a practice piece.

Great, lovely piece which my students always understated its difficulty.
For more information about this topic, click search below!
 

Logo light pianostreet.com - the website for classical pianists, piano teachers, students and piano music enthusiasts.

Subscribe for unlimited access

Sign up

Follow us

Piano Street Digicert