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Author Topic: J. S. Bach, Sarabande from French Suite #5 in G major  (Read 8977 times)
jazzyprof
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« on: August 07, 2005, 02:46:49 PM »

I just finished learning this piece and would welcome suggestions on how to improve it!  I used no pedal in this performance.  Does the absence of pedal make it too dry?  Is it too slow?  Do I need more embellishments?  How about the dynamics?  Any comments would be much appreciated.

* G_MA_SARABANDE_080505_02.mp3 (1905.41 KB - downloaded 298 times.)
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"Playing the piano is my greatest joy, next to my wife; it is my most absorbing interest, next to my work." ...Charles Cooke

piano sheet music of French Suite
allchopin
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« Reply #1 on: August 08, 2005, 06:47:25 PM »

Few comments here and there - overall good performance.

m.3 - Your beat choice for the grace note sounds a little odd (some kind of dotted eighth?)
m.10 - Not sure if you meant to or if your edition has it in, but you added a note (I believe an E).  It sounds fine; just making sure you know it was there.
m.13-14 - The sixteenth notes are played out of rhythm, somewhat syncopated.  Make sure to keep note values in rhythm.
m.15 - Personal choice, I would extend the trill a little longer up to the D.
m.1 (after repeat) - Again, there is a rhythm change which may be different in your edition.  You played the G eighth as a sixteenth (this happens occaisionally throughout).
Also, you may work on evening out the first set of triplets a bit more.
What was the variation you played at the end on the second pass?  It's not in my edition - did Bach put in this ossia?
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jazzyprof
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« Reply #2 on: August 09, 2005, 04:11:35 PM »

allchopin:  Thank you so much for your very detailed comments!  I have gone back and checked everything you mentioned and made corrections where needed.

m.3 - You're right.  The grace note should be an eighth.
m.10 - The added note (E) is in a revised version of the manuscript (Alfred edition, edited by J. Schneider)
m.13-14 - Yes, I will fix the 16th note rhythms here and also in the repeat of m.1.
m.1 - And yes, the triplets could be more even.

The variation at the end (on the second pass) is included in light print in my edition.  It is supposedly from a manuscript of H. N. Gerber, around 1725-26.
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"Playing the piano is my greatest joy, next to my wife; it is my most absorbing interest, next to my work." ...Charles Cooke
allchopin
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« Reply #3 on: August 10, 2005, 05:23:12 PM »

You're welcome, I hope I wasn't being too picky.

What made you opt for Gerber's ending rather than Bach's? (not a purist I see Smiley)
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