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The Creative Dance of Imagination – Tango for Two

Hear Khatia and Gavantsa Buniatishvili play Piazzolla’s Libertango from a forest recital with a concert grand piano in plain nature. As Groucho Marx said: “It takes two to Tango”. Read more >>

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Author Topic: Rach Prelude in C# minor  (Read 2394 times)
virtuoso_735
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« on: August 26, 2005, 10:19:45 PM »

Here is another recording of mine of Rachmaninoff's famous Prelude in C# minor. I hope you like it. All comments welcome. Thanks!

Here's the link: http://www.savefile.com/files.php?fid=1784287
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piano sheet music of Prelude
palika dunno
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« Reply #1 on: August 26, 2005, 11:38:59 PM »

is ok. but somehow boring. almost slept in while listening to the first part. the begining must be much louder. then in the pp chords the highest tone must always be the loudest. and the a, g-sharp, c-sharp between the pp chords must be clearer to hear...louder...and its just not expressive. it sounds as if you dont have anything to say. the agitato part is ok. but the 8 notes must be much more quiet and the quarters still cleaner and louder. one almost mustnt hear them (josef hofman does that perfect Shocked), it sounds as if you dont have the control of your fingers. the rest is also ok but again somehow boring.
its a cool piece..keep on working on it  Smiley

have fun and succes  Cheesy

palika
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hazypurple21
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« Reply #2 on: August 27, 2005, 03:00:48 AM »

Hm... the lento in the beginning is a little to rubato for me.
The agitato is good, although the melody could be a little more clear, especially in the descending chord section.
Also, the FFF lento section is noticably fast than the one in the beginning.
Other than that, it's quite emotional. Good.
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"There is one god-Bach-and Mendelssohn is his prophet."
graeme78
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« Reply #3 on: September 14, 2005, 01:13:15 AM »

The first part was ok, but needs a bit more of your own interpretation and expression.  It sounded a bit monotone and boring, but part of that could be the quality of the recording is not letting me hear much of your dynamics.

I found the middle section to be rushed, it's like the horse just burst out of the gate.  My suggestion would be to start it slowly and quietly and work your way up to the climax.  Try to be clean.  Watch your phrasing of the melody -  make sure the quarter notes join together and sing while hearing less of the eighth notes underneath it.

Overall it needs a bit more character and expression in my opinion, but you're off to a great start with it.
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palika dunno
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« Reply #4 on: September 16, 2005, 08:46:17 AM »

did you hear this one already?
http://s38.yousendit.com/d.aspx?id=2G50OKEKOQ1590R4ALQX007XAT

 Shocked Shocked Shocked Shocked Shocked Shocked

palika
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mcgillcomposer
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« Reply #5 on: September 19, 2005, 05:58:52 AM »

Hey,

Thanks for letting us hear your recording!  Just a few thoughts if I may.  The 3 note theme presented in the bass line need more phrasing (more unity).  The melody of the agitato section needs to come out more, and also need to have a more interesting shape and dynamic to it.  Also, it is fine to play something perfectly in tempo, but you must be careful not to make the chords sound "clunky".  Yours weren't that bad...the term clunky is an exaggeration...however the chord progressions need more shape to them.  Overall, I think the piece needs to be phrased...that is most important.  When it lacks phrasing...it simply doesn't make much sense as a coherent whole.

Nonetheless, I enjoyed listening!  You are well on your way...keep it up!

- Andrew
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pwhite
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« Reply #6 on: September 27, 2005, 04:13:58 AM »

Very good recording! Some things that I would suggest changing would be to express more dynamic contrast throughout the piece, particularly in the beginning. I would not AT ALL suggest speeding up the beginning of the piece, it is clearly marked Lento for good reason. The beginning of your second part is somewhat too fast and you should use more rubato, make the piece interesting. Too many players feel they have to keep to a strict force, which is very true in some composers. But not in piano solo prelude by rachmaninoff. Work on that final descending run to make sure every note is clearly articulated and make sure you are pedalling correctly, other than that it was a very good recording!

PS.-think of getting your piano tuned!
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a romantic
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« Reply #7 on: October 04, 2005, 12:29:08 AM »

I have a question:  what fingering do you suggest for the agitato sectior?  Specifically, in the first measure of that section, should I play all the quarter notes with finger 5, continually shifting my whole hand, or should I play the first with 5, the second two with 4, and fourth with 3 or 4?
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allthumbs
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« Reply #8 on: October 04, 2005, 06:56:33 AM »



Greetings

The piece has promise, however your piano is in dire need of tuning. Some parts of the piece should have been faster and some slower.

Here is the same piece by British pianist Peter Donohoe and it is my favorite interpretation of it.

http://savefile.com/projects/350362

Cheers

allthumbs

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gaer
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« Reply #9 on: October 04, 2005, 07:52:17 AM »

Here is the same piece by British pianist Peter Donohoe and it is my favorite interpretation of it.
Oh ***&&^^DFR cuss, cuss, cuss…

It's just not fair. All the talent, and he gets to play on a piano that has a bass that decays SO slowly. It's such a joy to hear a piece that has such a "trite rap" played with such honesty, passion and power.

I was going to post my own recording, but not now. <slinking away in discouragement>

Gary



Quote
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thierry13
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« Reply #10 on: October 05, 2005, 08:26:48 PM »

Here is the same piece by British pianist Peter Donohoe and it is my favorite interpretation of it.

Don't you think his agitato is way too slow ?
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allthumbs
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« Reply #11 on: October 06, 2005, 12:40:27 AM »


Don't you think his agitato is way too slow ?

Not really, because I think he was trying to have a bit of contrast from the beginning of the section in terms of speed and dynamics. He starts out the section slower playing mf and after few up and down dynamics changes in loudness, builds up to ff just before the triplet section at fff at which time he really lets it rip to the end of that section.

That's my story and I'm sticking to it! Wink

Cheers

allthumbs

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gaer
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« Reply #12 on: October 06, 2005, 03:28:10 AM »

That's my story and I'm sticking to it! Wink
And with "all thumbs" (both up), right? Smiley

Actually, I think it is incredibly effective to start the "agitato" section slowly and quietly to build up. I prefer it that way, although it is not often played that way. I know it's a "liberty", but I think it a very effective one!

Gaer
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jlh
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« Reply #13 on: October 09, 2005, 08:42:53 PM »

I have a question:  what fingering do you suggest for the agitato sectior?  Specifically, in the first measure of that section, should I play all the quarter notes with finger 5, continually shifting my whole hand, or should I play the first with 5, the second two with 4, and fourth with 3 or 4?

Your second suggestion is much better.
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sonatainfsharp
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« Reply #14 on: October 09, 2005, 10:03:24 PM »

First of all, you have a great start on this piece and it certainly suits you. I hope you spend a lot of time studying and performing this piece in the time to come!

The teacher in me, however, has a few things to point out:

I would take some time in voicing your opening chords. For example, you need to decide which notes carry the melody (hint: the top notes). What is happening now is your top note will stick out on one chord, then a middle note during another chord, etc. You need to think orchestrally and find the flute and let the flute have a solo.

As far as rubato, I loved your rubato in the beginning generally, but you have it in the wrong places (i.e. interrupting a phrase instead of ending one). Also, when you speed up, don't suddenly slow down.

Lastly, as far as the Lento section, you have several wrong notes--you hit them with such conviction that I think you are always playing them wrong and they weren't accidents, so be careful when reading.

I thought your agitato was great except one thing: The pedal. I understand what people are saying about the melody being unclear, but it isn't in your finger articulation--it all has to do with your pedalling. Also, you must connect the lento to the agitato--you can't think of them as one section ending and another beginning. After all, there is an eluded cadence there.

As far as going into measure 36, please don't suddenly speed up just because it is more fun--this is a very common error made by almost every student who plays this piece. Just be more aware, and again, watch the pedalling the most here.

The return of Tempo I was fantastic, but again, watch the rubato. At measure 51, don't take any agogic liberties getting from the low c#'s to the higher chords--get there as quickly as possible; there is no exception to this.

Lastly, regarding the final 7 measures, do something with the chords--shape them in a way that means something to you.

Otherwise, I find your performance of this piece to be quite wonderful and you have a fantastic start.

May I ask how long you have been working on this piece?
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